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Thread: Are Warmoth "Screamin' Deals" Necks Factory Seconds?

  1. #36
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    More to follow if anyone is interested in vicariously experiencing my slow-motion build-up.
    I'm interested. I put one together a while back out of low cost parts and some parts I already had. I think it came out pretty good.

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  2. #37
    Bent Member Chuck H's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bob p View Post
    Finish sanding is ultra smooth. I had originally thought about burnishing it with 400 and then 1000 grit, but out of the box it feels just fine.
    I like 'em smooth enough to clean (after oiling) and rough enough that there's some surface tension mitigation. Feels velvety smooth and fast. To that end I finish sand with 220. Fine enough that you don't see sanding strokes and coarse enough that the neck doesn't feel polished.

    At this point my strat neck IS polished though. Years of handling have buffed it to a shiny gloss. But it still never feels sticky. I can't say enough about tung oil for this application.

    And I'll be following along. What are your pickup plans? Stock arrangement or humbucker in the bridge? I saw one that was definitely coloring outside the lines with a pair of p90's. Seemed like a good idea to me.

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    "I'm just going to perform a bit more scientific investigation, turn it up to 11 and rip of the knob." überfuzz

    "...less ear-friendly but handy for jazz." Leo_Gnardo

    "A pedal, any kind, will not make a Guitar player more dangerous than he already is." J M Fahey

    "If you build it, it will hum..." Justin Thomas

  3. #38
    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    And I'll be following along.
    This is the boring hijack part:

    I think I remember you saying that you liked the W* "59" profile, which is a 59 LP type of neck.

    I don't know if this has been a problem for you, Chuck, but I thought I'd ask about your experience -- as I've gotten older I've had more problems with left hand (fingerboard) cramping and the solution for me has been baseball bat necks. For the longest time I thought it was just me, but the more I've talked about it the more I've found that it's a common problem as guys get older. I just can't play for very long on a skinny neck before the cramping starts.

    The modern thin C necks really bother me. I've been really happy with the Indo G&L necks, which are more comfortable for me than modern Fenders. I was totally happy with those, but all hell broke loose when I bought a jumbo archtop back in November. It was one of those big 1930s guitars that are so big that you don't really hold them, you ride them, if you know what I mean. The neck is fine, it's a fairly meaty C, but I had to change my entire playing style to accommodate that big 17 x 3-1/2 body, and the long scale neck which puts the headstock out pretty far away. Without realizing it I put a huge strain on my neck, shoulder and left wrist while trying to do lower position jazzy chords. By accommodating with poor wrist positioning (continuous hard flexing with a far away nut) I kept straining my neck, left shoulder, and extensor tendons without realizing it until all of a sudden it was really bad.

    I developed a really bad case of tennis elbow that has kept a guitar out of my hands for months. It was so bad that the pain would wake me up at night. I couldn't even pick up a cup of coffee or pour a gallon of milk with my left hand for a couple of months, I had to get treated with steroids, etc., so I've been sidelined as a one-armed bandit since November. I was supposed to be totally sidelined for 6 months. After a 3+ months of total off-time started feeling better and I've tried "cheating" by playing for short periods, and I've found that the best solution for me has been going back to a solidbody instead of a thick hollowbody (solid bodies are just so much easier to wrap my body around and the neck/shoulder/arm/hand geometry is so much better). Opening my grip by playing my baseball bat Gibsons has made things a lot better too. This has taken a lot of the strain off of my left arm/elbow. I hate to think about it, but I may never be able to go back to playing a giant jazzbox, so it's back to solidbodies for now.


    What are your pickup plans? Stock arrangement or humbucker in the bridge? I saw one that was definitely coloring outside the lines with a pair of p90's. Seemed like a good idea to me.
    Back to the build:

    I've already got the fat-neck covered with an LP/PAF and an LP/P90, so now I'm building myself a baseball bat necked Strat. The good news is that I'm using an American Strat body that is already routed for HSS, so if I decide to change between SSS and HSS all that will be required is a loaded pickguard swap. The body came with SSS so I'll be starting off there.

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    "Stand back, I'm holding a calculator." - chinrest

    "I happen to have an original 1955 Stratocaster! The neck and body have been replaced with top quality Warmoth parts, I upgraded the hardware and put in custom, hand wound pickups. It's fabulous. There's nothing like that vintage tone or owning an original." - Chuck H

  4. #39
    Bent Member Chuck H's Avatar
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    Well I can only speak for my own experience and preferences, but you DID ask...

    I would be perfectly comfortable on a boat neck or any other fat profile. But I much prefer that there's still a taper to the neck and none of the fatter profiles offer that except for the 59. My own neck is just a tad fatter than the current "59" but I bought it over twenty years ago. I have no idea what their dimensions were at that time or if my neck was a second because of this. It's basically a 59 that's just noticeably fatter. Maybe 1/32" at the nut and the 12 fret. So the taper is still there. I fell in love with it the moment I touched it and I've been a fan of fatter necks since. I'm basically a rock player that dabbles in other genres like blues, metal and always lean toward the pop side so there's always the possibility of mixing it up with something else. I "like" jazz, but never invested in it. And I tend to be a thumb hanger, so I'd have to unlearn a bunch of bad habits to go that direction. I think I use the taper on stage to feel my position and that's why I like it. There's really not a lot of reasons to want more thickness on one position than another other than that. So that choice is yours. I picked the 59 because it's thicker than the thin ones and has a taper. As to thin necks...

    When I was gigging I needed a guitar that had a locking trem and a HSS pickup lineup because there's not much a guitar like that won't do. Limited in some ways, but versatile in a real way. So I bought an Ibanez RG540. That guitar has the "wizard" neck. It's wide enough that there was still some neck in my hand, and I got use to it but never preferred it and I abandoned it once I got my Carvin DC400. Which had a neck profile sort of between the standard Strat neck and the Warmoth 59. I'm just "ok" with the standard Strat" neck profile. I've played so many of them that it's at least familiar, but I'll take a fatter neck any time. I've played enough boat necks to know I like them better even without the taper. So I guess that would be my priorities.

    I'm wicked sorry for your playing fatigue/discomfort. I don't have that, yet. It's happened, sure. It's not common but I don't play much anymore either.

    I had a recent issue with nerve impingement that reduced information exchange between my brain and my left arm. That's getting better now, but the neck issue isn't the sort that's going away. So it'll happen again and again. I'll lose a little motor control and feeling each time. But I haven't mentioned it because The Dude has a much harder story about overcoming paralytic circumstances and he gigs regularly and happily. Basically, none of us have room to complain about anything, ever again Then there's the ideal that you play for love and it works when you do. Regardless of physical limitations. So I won't be Steve Vai. So what.?. I'll be Chuck then instead. Django and Tony showed us all that physical impairment and musicianship don't have to be at odds.

    Going with the standard three SC pickups still has out of the box options. I have my strat rigged with series pickup options and a phase invert for the middle pickup and I love it. I don't do any "chicken picken" so I did away with the bridge/middle option to achieve this. I use a master volume and master tone with the parallel/series switch mounted in the rear pot hole and a pull pot on the tone for the middle pickup phase. I DO have a humbucker in the bridge, but I've done this wiring for others with three singles and it's just great. I think I could even live without a bridge humbucker with this wiring.

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    "I'm just going to perform a bit more scientific investigation, turn it up to 11 and rip of the knob." überfuzz

    "...less ear-friendly but handy for jazz." Leo_Gnardo

    "A pedal, any kind, will not make a Guitar player more dangerous than he already is." J M Fahey

    "If you build it, it will hum..." Justin Thomas

  5. #40
    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    Thanks for the finishing tips. I think I'll go with the oil rather than the burnishing. It's a lot less effort and it sounds like it'll get me to the endpoint that I want.

    About that elbow thing, I consider myself lucky. I've been playing for over 40 years and I've never had any sort of guitar related injury. When my time finally came it was caused by poor decision making on my part, and now I know better. The only reason that I've mentioned the problem is because I'm trying to work toward a solution to avoid the problem again, and luckily that might just amount to finding a guitar that's a better fit. I have to consider how lucky I am to live in a time where I can buy a custom profile bolt-on neck that should effectively solve my problem. In the old days finding the right guitar involved a lot fewer choices and a lot more hunting, but today the solution can be as simple as a neck swap.

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    "Stand back, I'm holding a calculator." - chinrest

    "I happen to have an original 1955 Stratocaster! The neck and body have been replaced with top quality Warmoth parts, I upgraded the hardware and put in custom, hand wound pickups. It's fabulous. There's nothing like that vintage tone or owning an original." - Chuck H

  6. #41
    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck H View Post
    Going with the standard three SC pickups still has out of the box options. I have my strat rigged with series pickup options and a phase invert for the middle pickup and I love it. I don't do any "chicken picken" so I did away with the bridge/middle option to achieve this. I use a master volume and master tone with the parallel/series switch mounted in the rear pot hole and a pull pot on the tone for the middle pickup phase. I DO have a humbucker in the bridge, but I've done this wiring for others with three singles and it's just great. I think I could even live without a bridge humbucker with this wiring.
    One of the problems that I've found with strats is that the bridge is just too shrill unless it's connected to a tone pot. So I'm not a big fan of the bridge pup, though I do use it in combination with the middle. but most of the time I find myself at the other end of the switch on a strat. I've actually given some thought to not even having a bridge SC, which means I might as well try HSS. Another thing that's bothered me on my Strats is the treble loss with volume pot reduction. So I'll be putting in a bright cap, as well as trying a few other things. your wiring scheme sounds interesting. Almost like a Red Special.

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    "Stand back, I'm holding a calculator." - chinrest

    "I happen to have an original 1955 Stratocaster! The neck and body have been replaced with top quality Warmoth parts, I upgraded the hardware and put in custom, hand wound pickups. It's fabulous. There's nothing like that vintage tone or owning an original." - Chuck H

  7. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by bob p View Post
    One of the problems that I've found with strats is that the bridge is just too shrill unless it's connected to a tone pot.
    I feel the same about the bridge pickup. I use a Super Switch (Ultra Switch) and wire it so the bottom tone pot only works in position 1 (bridge) and the middle tone pot only works in positions 2 to 5 with no interaction between switch positions. The bottom tone pot is always on 5 to take the edge of the bridge.

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    Last edited by Dave H; 04-07-2018 at 12:15 AM. Reason: clarity

  8. #43
    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    The W* Profile

    I've taken some measurements on my W* compound radius neck, and I'm going to post some details that I wish that I could have gotten before placing my order:

    ---

    Nut slot is cut flat, not arched.

    Fret and Radius Measurements:

    1st -- 10"
    3rd -- 12"
    14th -- 14"
    21/22 -- 16"

    Some of my preliminary observations:

    At the nut / 1st fret the 10" radius is close enough to the Strat 9.5" radius that you can get away with using a flat-bottom Strat nut.

    The 10" radius is only there for the cowboy chords. The transition from 10" to 12" is fast -- from 1st to 3rd. As soon as you get to the 3rd fret you're looking at a 12" LP type of radius.

    The radius transitions more gradually between 12" and 14" over an 11-fret span between the 3rd and 14th.

    It only gets really flat above the 14th, where it transitions from 14" to 16" when you're pretty high -- 14th on up to 21/22.

    ---

    I couldn't find this information anywhere else so I thought I'd post it.

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    "Stand back, I'm holding a calculator." - chinrest

    "I happen to have an original 1955 Stratocaster! The neck and body have been replaced with top quality Warmoth parts, I upgraded the hardware and put in custom, hand wound pickups. It's fabulous. There's nothing like that vintage tone or owning an original." - Chuck H

  9. #44
    Bent Member Chuck H's Avatar
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    Those numbers don't mean anything to me without researching the actual distances, not numbers of frets. Because the compound radius concept only works, physically, if the graduation from 10" to 16" radius is a straight cone. Anything other than a straight cone would make it impossible to set up the guitar with a low action. Pretty sure W* knows this too Don't worry about it

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    "I'm just going to perform a bit more scientific investigation, turn it up to 11 and rip of the knob." überfuzz

    "...less ear-friendly but handy for jazz." Leo_Gnardo

    "A pedal, any kind, will not make a Guitar player more dangerous than he already is." J M Fahey

    "If you build it, it will hum..." Justin Thomas

  10. #45
    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    sure, fret-to-fret distance is what matters if you want to draw the cone. knowing the fret locations makes it easy enough to convert those numbers into distance by grabbing a strat and a ruler, or looking at a fret distance table. i didn't intend it as a means of telling someone how to set the bridge, which should be flatter than any of those numbers because of the cone.

    i posted the numbers because i think the fret numbers by themselves are enough to help someone figure out what the neck is going to feel like in the different "zones".

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    "Stand back, I'm holding a calculator." - chinrest

    "I happen to have an original 1955 Stratocaster! The neck and body have been replaced with top quality Warmoth parts, I upgraded the hardware and put in custom, hand wound pickups. It's fabulous. There's nothing like that vintage tone or owning an original." - Chuck H

  11. #46
    Bent Member Chuck H's Avatar
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    I think (that is, IMHO) that if you've played on both smaller and larger radius fingerboards much that the compound radius doesn't require any thought or playing adjustment at all. I honestly never thought anything about it and nothing ever seemed or felt weird. Set up is just the same as ever. Get your string height close and check your neck relief under proper string tension and adjust. Then set your string height proper by measuring at the 12th fret. Then adjust for your specific guitars anomalies (some guitars seem to like small differences in string height due to their tone or resonance). I'm pretty picky about nut slot height as well and I do that next. Then intonation. The compound radius may change the actual radius of the bridge, but since it's all done by individual string height it really doesn't matter.

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    "I'm just going to perform a bit more scientific investigation, turn it up to 11 and rip of the knob." überfuzz

    "...less ear-friendly but handy for jazz." Leo_Gnardo

    "A pedal, any kind, will not make a Guitar player more dangerous than he already is." J M Fahey

    "If you build it, it will hum..." Justin Thomas

  12. #47
    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck H View Post
    I think (that is, IMHO) that if you've played on both smaller and larger radius fingerboards much that the compound radius doesn't require any thought or playing adjustment at all.
    I've got lots of experience with constant radius fingerboards. I'm happy as a clam on 7.5", 9.5" and 12", though I've never really liked a constant radius 16" fingerboard. They're great for soloing but just awful for chording. I can't stand a Jackson neck, but that's for a number of reasons that go beyond he fingerboard radius. the flat, wide and thin thing has never appealed to me.

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    "Stand back, I'm holding a calculator." - chinrest

    "I happen to have an original 1955 Stratocaster! The neck and body have been replaced with top quality Warmoth parts, I upgraded the hardware and put in custom, hand wound pickups. It's fabulous. There's nothing like that vintage tone or owning an original." - Chuck H

  13. #48
    Bent Member Chuck H's Avatar
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    Totally agree. I think my wizard neck had a constant 14" and even that felt too flat and unusual in the first position. But, to me, the flatter radius always feels fine higher up. That's why I was willing to try the compound radius. I fully expected it to feel weird, but it didn't. And it's not just long time familiarity. I can pick up a guitar with a constant radius fingerboard without even noticing the difference. The exception being that the old Fender 7.25" radius feels ridiculous above the 12th fret to me. The 9.5" radius feels just ok. Still too round. the Gibson 12" constant radius feels fine though. I have a Yamaha with a 350mm (13.77") constant radius and it feels just fine. Where the Wizard neck just felt too much like a pancake both front and back the Yamaha just hints at starting to get "high performance" and the rounder back profile helps. Anyway... I think anyone that's played a lot of different guitars would be at home with the compound radius.

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    "I'm just going to perform a bit more scientific investigation, turn it up to 11 and rip of the knob." überfuzz

    "...less ear-friendly but handy for jazz." Leo_Gnardo

    "A pedal, any kind, will not make a Guitar player more dangerous than he already is." J M Fahey

    "If you build it, it will hum..." Justin Thomas

  14. #49
    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    This W* will be my first CR neck. I won't be getting around to mounting it for a while, still need to get other things done first. But in the interim I've been fondling it while I watch TV. The transitions do feel smooth and go by without notice. I think it's going to serve the desired purpose -- for me, that is being able to bend up high on a strat without having to raise the action really high to avoid fretting out.

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    "Stand back, I'm holding a calculator." - chinrest

    "I happen to have an original 1955 Stratocaster! The neck and body have been replaced with top quality Warmoth parts, I upgraded the hardware and put in custom, hand wound pickups. It's fabulous. There's nothing like that vintage tone or owning an original." - Chuck H

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    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    Progress Update: Tuner Installation

    Sorry for the delay, but this project is moving along at a glacial pace.

    I finally got around to doing the tuner installation today. I opted for Fender locking tuners, just to try something different. The Fender lockers use the Schaller-size pilot hole, which is 25/64" non-tapered. I had W drill the tuner holes as part of my order specification. They did a nice job on the 25/64" holes, as my drill bit fit nice and tight. But they didn't drill any pilot holes for the tuners' indexing pins. As you can see in the photo below there are only the 6 holes for the shafts of the tuners, and the holes for the indexing pins will be my responsibility:



    I decided to use the Fender locking tuners in the Chrome finish, Fender PN 0990818100. I managed to find them on-sale at MF for $32 shipped. They have two 3/16" x 1/8" indexing pins on each tuner. Here's a photo that I've borrowed from the web:



    The hardest part of the install was going to be drilling the 12 indexing pins in the right locations. StewMac sells a jig to do this that costs way too much money, so I ended up taking a lot of measurements with a pair of calipers and designing a jig out of a piece of scrap plastic L-bracket that my neighbor had left over from a window remodeling project. It took two tries to get it right, but the second attempt produced a jig that was perfect. I positioned a 25/64" drill bit in the tuner hole, placed the jig on top of it, and then drilled a shallow pair of test holes for the indexing pins using a 3/16" drill bit and a stop-gauge that I fabricated out of a piece of dowel. I installed all of the tuners and verified that their bodies were in alignment using a straightedge, and verified that all of the shafts were perpindicular to the top of the headstock. After verifying that everything was OK I went back and drilled full depth holes.

    Here's how it turned out:




    Just in case anyone decides to use these types of tuners on a project, be forewarned that having two indexing pins rather than a single indexing pin means that you'll have to be very precise about hole locations in order to get a smooth fit. With a little patience it's not hard to do.

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    "Stand back, I'm holding a calculator." - chinrest

    "I happen to have an original 1955 Stratocaster! The neck and body have been replaced with top quality Warmoth parts, I upgraded the hardware and put in custom, hand wound pickups. It's fabulous. There's nothing like that vintage tone or owning an original." - Chuck H

  16. #51
    Bent Member Chuck H's Avatar
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    Finish?

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    "I'm just going to perform a bit more scientific investigation, turn it up to 11 and rip of the knob." überfuzz

    "...less ear-friendly but handy for jazz." Leo_Gnardo

    "A pedal, any kind, will not make a Guitar player more dangerous than he already is." J M Fahey

    "If you build it, it will hum..." Justin Thomas

  17. #52
    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    The neck is still naked, just as it came from the factory. I didn't want to do any finish work until I had drilled all of the holes, just in case I buggered something up along the way. Fortunately that wasn't a problem. Eventually it's going to get oiled.

    I couldn't resist the temptation to bolt everything together to get some play time on it, so I went ahead and installed the nut, bolted it together and strung it up. Nice fit. The W neck went onto the new Fender body without any need for shims or any other alignment issues. I've done the preliminary tremolo balancing act with a set of 10s and I've played it a bit.

    I'm liking the fatness of the "fatback" profile (no front to back taper, 1" all the way). The nut is high right now, so the action is a little high at the nut end, and I know that I'm going to have to make adjustments to the nut height, but I'm holding off on doing that until everything has a chance to settle in a bit under tension. My goal is to set this one up with 12s. One step at a time...

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    Last edited by bob p; 04-22-2018 at 04:39 AM. Reason: speling errurs
    "Stand back, I'm holding a calculator." - chinrest

    "I happen to have an original 1955 Stratocaster! The neck and body have been replaced with top quality Warmoth parts, I upgraded the hardware and put in custom, hand wound pickups. It's fabulous. There's nothing like that vintage tone or owning an original." - Chuck H

  18. #53
    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    So Chuck, did you say that you are playing with a HB at the bridge position? I'm wondering what you did for a bridge, as my understanding is that the vintage strat bridge assembly has the 2-7/32 string spacing, which is wider than traditional HB string spacing. Most people that go to HSS on a strat seem to use the narrower 2-1/16 string spacing so they don't have to go with wider than normal HB pickups. Most HSS type strats use a narrower trem/bridge spacing than the vintage SSS so they can use stock HB pups.

    Example:

    Code:
    Strat Type         6-screw pivot spacing    String Spacing
    ----------------   ---------------------    ----------------------
    Vintage SSS        2-7/32                   2-7/32
    Hybrid SSS/HSS     2-7/32                   2-1/16
    Mexican Strat      2-1/16                   2-1/16
    Right now I'm sitting on the fence about SSS vs. HSS. I have the hybrid bridge option in the middle. I'm used to the Vintage SSS 2-7/32 spacing so this narrow spacing is taking some getting used to.

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    "Stand back, I'm holding a calculator." - chinrest

    "I happen to have an original 1955 Stratocaster! The neck and body have been replaced with top quality Warmoth parts, I upgraded the hardware and put in custom, hand wound pickups. It's fabulous. There's nothing like that vintage tone or owning an original." - Chuck H

  19. #54
    Old Timer tedmich's Avatar
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    Someone famous liked tongue oil on the neck... who was that?

    Oh yeah it was Prince!
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    Hmm that neck probably tests positive now...for any number of things...

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  20. #55
    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    Tongue oil! LMAO!

    I'll probably end up using TUNG oil instead.

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    "Stand back, I'm holding a calculator." - chinrest

    "I happen to have an original 1955 Stratocaster! The neck and body have been replaced with top quality Warmoth parts, I upgraded the hardware and put in custom, hand wound pickups. It's fabulous. There's nothing like that vintage tone or owning an original." - Chuck H

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    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck H View Post
    Tung oil, FWIW ambers like crazy. My guitar is a tad browner and half as amber and it's over twenty years old. They must have surveys and panels that they bounce these decisions off because there's no way the entire replica market decided on f#@&ing orange arbitrarily. So I guess most shoppers like it.?.
    Chuck, I'd like to see your 20 yo amber'd tung oil finish. Photos of new fake-amber synthetic finishes are a dime a dozen, but genuine aged seed oil? Can't say that I've seen any. Got pics?

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    "Stand back, I'm holding a calculator." - chinrest

    "I happen to have an original 1955 Stratocaster! The neck and body have been replaced with top quality Warmoth parts, I upgraded the hardware and put in custom, hand wound pickups. It's fabulous. There's nothing like that vintage tone or owning an original." - Chuck H

  22. #57
    Bent Member Chuck H's Avatar
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    I'll try to come up with some pics. Our digital camera took a "S" right after the warranty period, even though we didn't use it much. I don't use a smart phone so I'll need to have my wife take the pic and send it to my email and then retrieve it (small PITA but nbd).

    As to string spacing... I have a Seymour Duncan JB mini in the bridge. That's the single coil sized one with the two narrow coils. I like it pretty well. Might be a little TOO fat if anything. Anyway, since it's made for a strat it spaces out for a strat, BUT...

    The outer poles are actually a tad outside my string spacing. Still under the strings, but erring a little wide. The reason is that I'm using a non Fender bridge that (I believe) has the Mexican spacing. I've never taken any finite measurements, but I chose the narrower bridge because I HATE strings being too close to the finger board edges. I like a little room there so that when I'm wanking there's less chance of pulling or pushing a string over the fret edge. Strats run too close anyway for me and I've played strats that have strings SO close to the edges that I can feel the edge of the board under my fingers. Pleh. Give me some wiggle room instead, thank you. But I have long, narrow fingers. I don't think the tiny, overall difference in spacing would be otherwise noticeable, but if had sausage fingers maybe I'd notice the narrower spacing.?. YMMV but there's a piece of practical partscaster build experience to consider.

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    Old Timer tedmich's Avatar
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    I've used Libron Finishing oil, which is probably mostly tung, to great effect on both body and neck of my 8 string

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  24. #59
    Bent Member Chuck H's Avatar
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    There are a lot of products out there. Most are a combination of some sort of wiping varnish and hard oils with a little solvent thrown in. Real tung oil takes 2 days to a week to dry between coats!!! My patience was sorely tested. The stuff i used was an OOoold can from the store room in a paint shop I worked for. It was old when I found it twenty five years ago and the product no longer existed in any company inventory. It was a quart can and just said "Dunne Paints" and "Tung Oil". But the results were good. Watco is probably the most popular, mostly tung oil and some other seed oils and is used happily by some builders here. Trying to stack coats takes almost as long as tung oil. True oil gets some press here too, but I don't care for boiled linseed oils, they feel stickier to me. My current favorite product is Seafin Teak Oil. I have no idea what's in it, but it goes on like tung oil and the finished product feels a lot like tung oil. But since you can stack coats on successive days I have to assume it's a wiping varnish with some hard oils in it. I have some pool cues, a big wooden bowl, a small table and chairs and some decorative wood around that I've used it on. Not to mention a number finishing jobs I've done for customers as a painter. I will almost certainly use it for my next guitar project. One reason is that I'm in the PNW now and waiting for real tung oil to dry could mean a month between coats! The humidity is rarely below 60% and usually in the 80's.

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    "I'm just going to perform a bit more scientific investigation, turn it up to 11 and rip of the knob." überfuzz

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    I've had good luck in the past with this polymerized tung oil:

    Polymerized Tung Oil - Lee Valley Tools

    I found it produced a nicer finish than the Watco 'Danish' oil. It's been a long time since I've used it, but recently I saw a mahogany neck I finished with it about 15 years ago and it was still looking good and smooth. That probably had a dozen or more coats, but you can do a coat a day with no problems. Using it on mahogany was an experiment; I wasn't sure how well it would work on a softer wood but it seems to have held up really well. I haven't used that oil in quite a while but I think I'll get some more for a maple tele neck I'm finishing up. It has straight tung oil on it right now, which is smooth, but in line with what Chuck said above, it's never quite felt entirely dry. Not wet per se, but the sort or surface dust sticks to. It's not quite the northwest here, but generally fairly damp too.

    Andy

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