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Thread: Bugera V55HD questions and concerns

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    Bugera V55HD questions and concerns

    Greetings! I recently purchased a Bugera V55HD head and had some questions regarding reliability issues, any mods, etc. First off, I have blown 3 fuses already, one the interior fuse and the back panel fuse twice. The interior fuse blew after switching the standby switch on after a break before the fourth set my bar band played one night. The external fuse blew when my 20 month old son turned the amp off while I was playing at home, so that's an obvious. Last night we played a 2 hour opening set, and towards the end of the set, the external fuse blew. I spoke to the local music store where I bought the amp after the first fuse blew, and I was informed that the local bars are notorious for having crappy wiring, and other guys have had problems. My concern and question is is this amp robust enough to be gigged at least twice weekly? I'm playing classic rock, country, some newer stuff as well, and I'm not running this amp anywhere near full bore. Would a power conditioner be a sound investment? Would it alleviate the fuse blowing under bar playing conditions? Any recommendations would be appreciated. I'm running into a Marshall JCM 800 4x12 by the way, and it really is a great sounding amp.

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    Supporting Member Jazz P Bass's Avatar
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    Take it back & get another one.

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    Jazz P Bass, I'm leaning towards your thinking. Had a gig tonight, we warmed up/sound checked on a spirited blues jam, after about ten minutes, poof, external fuse gone. Replaced it, turned it on, poof, gone again. I had my trusty Crate Vintage Club 20 ready to go, played through it running into the Marshall cab all night. I've had the Crate for 10 years now, it's been a little work horse, sounds great through the cab, miced out of course. I'm taking the Bugera back Monday, going to tell them to get me a new one, see how that works out. My apologies to the forum, it seems to be a little more technically orientated than I am, I'm just a player who loves that good ol' tube tone. Been playing over 30 years, off and on in the clubs, just recently joined a working band gigging several nights a month. I thought the Bugera would be my new work horse, remains to be seen.

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    Old Timer Gtr_tech's Avatar
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    Not that it has anything to do with the fuse popping problem, but you shouldn't use the standy on set breaks. Turn it on, warm it up and once you put it into play mode....leave it there 'till the end of the night. Its hard on the output tubes to be cycled on/off stby several times for each playing session. Thermal expansion when hot (play) and the contraction (stby) causes output tubes to fail from mechanical stress.
    The farmer takes a wife, the barber takes a pole....

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    Thanks Gtr_tech. I've been told to put it on standby during set breaks, but what you're saying makes sense. As far as the Bugera goes, i just replaced the fuse here at home and turned it on. Powered up OK, let it sit on standby for a few minutes, as I played through it, I got a low hum, and then the fuse blew after a few seconds. It's going back tomorrow.

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    Supporting Member Jazz P Bass's Avatar
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    You know, the amp was shipped from China.
    Trucked around to who knows where.
    Picked up.
    Set down.
    Bumped.
    Then you received it.
    It "may" just be a bad tube.
    Seeing that it is a new purchase & you are having fuse issues, yeah, take it back.

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    Jazz, what gets me is that it worked fine for a few shows. I spoke to my local tube amp tech, not affiliated with the music store where I bought the amp, but a guy I trust and respect for his knowledge. He feels it could be a burn in issue, but of course, he won't be tearing into because it's still under warranty. I'll have the tech at the music store check it out, and if it won't be reliable, it goes back for a replacement. Or maybe I'll swap it out for the little Egnater they have sitting around...

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    JM2C...

    First, I disagree about using the standby switch. That's what it's there for. I can't say I've been privy to the same information about tube expansion and contraction but in a properly designed power supply the standby switch shouldn't cause any extra wear on tubes AFAIK.

    Another vote for returning the amp. You say "If it can't be made reliable", well, that's a broad issue that I'll bring up in the next paragraph. But as far as any repairs go, what constitutes "reliable" to the tech your bringing it to? If he/she repairs it they send it out as repaired and in good working order. Unless the tech is able to find some acute issue that has been responsible for the reliability issues thus far and able to report that it is now repaired and these issues won't happen again, I would say that the "made reliable" criteria hasn't been met. Now...

    If you want a reliable and dependable road tool for shows you need to spend more than $350. By todays market it puts that amp on par with the likes of Kay and Harmony or even Sears store brand amps from back in the day. If your going to be professional you need to be able to finish a show without problems. Sometimes that requires an investment. That's why you wouldn't hire a professional DJ trying to do shows with a Mr. Microphone or a doctor using two styrofoam cups and a piece of string for a stethoscope. Compared to real road gear that amp is basically a toy.

    Just my humble opinion. I know it's offensive but if your going to be disappointed in a budget product it should be kept in perspective.
    "I should have been born sooner. Of course, if I had been, I might be dead now." trem

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    Old Timer Gtr_tech's Avatar
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    The standby switch is there for 1 reason only.....to let the cathodes heat to operating temp before hitting the plates with HT.

    Do this: warm up an amp for a min on stby...then put it into play mode. Vol down, no input. Listen closely as the output tubes heat up from idle current. Hear the "tink" noises the tubes make? Kinda like a car engine after being shut off. Thats teh internal structure of the tube expanding. Let it sit until the noises stop.....then put it back into stby. You'll hear the same noises from the output tubes as they cool down from no current thru them.

    The thermal cycling from using the stby sw correctly (leaving it in play mode all night) causes enough stress on the output tubes just from repeated use. You cycle it several times during each use and you'll damn sure shorten the life of the output tubes. Ever notice how a new tube will not rattle when you tap on it? And used tubes, even those used in vibration free environments, will have a mechanical rattle after a while......due to thermal expansion loosening up the internals.
    The farmer takes a wife, the barber takes a pole....

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    I'll also add that IMHE certain power tubes, especially el84's, when they get old enough to actually wear out, usually do so in the form of internal mechanical vibration causing microphony more than loss of power or fidelity.
    "I should have been born sooner. Of course, if I had been, I might be dead now." trem

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    Old Timer Gtr_tech's Avatar
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    Right. Tubes are inherently mechanical devices that serve an electrical purpose in a vacuum. 98% of the time when/if they fail its due to mechanical failure long before the cathodes lose thier ability to emit electrons.

    I'm not a fan of EL84s....'specially in combo amps. They get rattled to death in no time. I'll take 6V6s thanks....
    The farmer takes a wife, the barber takes a pole....

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    Noodle of Reality Steve Conner's Avatar
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    Behringer/Bugera might be a bit cheesy, but I think the comparison with styrofoam cups and string is a tad unfair. The amp has an obvious fault (I'd guess bad power tube) and you can get it made good under warranty. Egnater are probably more roadworthy, though.

    Re the standby switch: I know the tinkling noises you mean. The standby switch is not for casually flipping dozens of times a night. The KT88 datasheet even states that the life spec is based on so many on/off cycles per day. (2 iirc?) But I don't think it does harm to use it during a long break. After all, heat buildup from the power tubes shortens the life of all the other parts. And, the temperature of the tube innards bounces up and down as you play. If it bothers you, well I heard of these new things called transistors that fixed all these problems. Tubes are basically born to die.


    Are 6v6s really less microphonic than EL84s?
    Last edited by Steve Conner; 01-03-2011 at 12:56 PM.
    "Enzo, I see that you replied parasitic oscillations. Is that a hypothesis? Or is that your amazing metal band I should check out?"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Conner View Post
    Are 6v6s really less microphonic than EL84s?
    IME, yes. I build mostly with el84's for a couple of reasons. They're very affordable, they have two distinct characters depending on how you run them, people seem to like them (trendy right now) and I like the way they sound. But I do think 6V6's are more durable overall and much less prone to microphonics. And I do like the way they sound but not as much as el84's.

    OK, two styrofoam cups and a piece of string was unfair. I tend to overstate my analogies for dramatic effect. I still stand by the point though.

    I also don't know that I subscribe to tubes being basically mechanical devices. They pass electrons as their primary function. No levers, cogs, wheels or any device where energy is used to accelerate matter. The cathode is heated so that's a more or less a mechanical function but I might say there are mechanical side effects to a tubes means of electronic function.
    "I should have been born sooner. Of course, if I had been, I might be dead now." trem

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    Old Timer Gtr_tech's Avatar
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    OK, if you suspend something from your ceiling with a piece of wire, thats a mechanical connection right? What do you think is going on inside a tube? Grids are just a piece of wire wrapped around 2 posts for support. Plates are just formed pieces of sheet metal. Its just a mechanical structure until you take it out of the environment via a vacuum and add operating voltages. The closest thing a tube has to an "active" element is the cathode.

    Mechanical doesn't *have* to mean gears, levers, and pulleys.
    The farmer takes a wife, the barber takes a pole....

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    With all respect, all I get from this is how a tube is constructed mechanically. So is a transistor. So is a radar dish, an Xray imager and even a piece of lead wire. I would argue that with the exception of any srtuctural support offered by a piece of lead wire that it's not performing a mechanical function.

    Definition of MECHANICAL
    1a (1) : of or relating to machinery or tools <mechanical applications of science> <a mechanical genius> <mechanical aptitude> (2) : produced or operated by a machine or tool <mechanical power> <a mechanical refrigerator> <a mechanical saw> b : of or relating to manual operations
    2: of or relating to artisans or machinists <the mechanical trades>
    "I should have been born sooner. Of course, if I had been, I might be dead now." trem

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    Old Timer Gtr_tech's Avatar
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    Semiconductors are electrically connected internally. Tubes are not. Just a few metal parts hanging in the air....or lack of.
    The farmer takes a wife, the barber takes a pole....

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    Senior Member Enzo's Avatar
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    My first question is this: Are you supposed to be using slow blow fuses? And are you using them?

    And assuming the fuses are correct, the MAIN reason fuses blow in tube amps is... bad power tubes.
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

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    Thanks for all the replies. The tech at the music store that the external fuse should be fast, that's what I've been using. He got into the amp today, he said it ran for several minutes then blew the fuse again. One of the power tubes was glowing as he put it "cherry red". He's waiting for schematics from Bugera (of which I will be requesting a copy for future out of warranty issues for my tube amp tech). May just be bad tubes, as suggested. We agreed that the amp has traveled half way around the world, been through UPS or FedEx terminals, on trucks, etc. so it has probably been bounced around a bit.

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    Senior Member Enzo's Avatar
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    Well, if that tech is an authorized Bugera service shop, he cannot give you a copy of the schematic, he had to sign a non-disclosure agreement.

    If he is an authorized repair station for behringer, the V55 schematics are already on the support site for him to download, no waiting. if he is not an authorized repair center for them, they won;t send him any schematics, they will want to send the amp to a repair station or exchange it for you.

    Cherry red tubes are either defective or missing their bias voltage, either thing is easily determined without a schematic. 6L6 and all the other common power tubes we run into have well known pinouts to any tech. My suspicion is the tube is defective, try a different set of 6L6s.

    The internal fuses are fast except for the +/-15v supplies which use T1A fuses.

    The mains fuse is shown as a T2A for 120VAC operation. T1A for 240vAC.

    T, as in time delay, slow blow. With red plating tubes, I don;t think the fuse speed is the real issue though. Using a fast where a slow belongs usually only pops at power up.
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

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    jackruby64, I just want to back Enzo. This is a thoughtful post. Enzo is "arming" you with the info you need to avoid any shinanagins and get on the right track toward your goal and he's spot on. You can use this info to determine if everything is on the up and if the guys handling your amp actually know how to help you.
    "I should have been born sooner. Of course, if I had been, I might be dead now." trem

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    Senior Member Enzo's Avatar
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    And I wasn;t suggesting the guy was dishonest or anything, but he may not realize they won;'t send him schematics and he is patiently waiting for them.
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

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    Bugera V55HD problems

    Quote Originally Posted by jackruby64 View Post
    Greetings! I recently purchased a Bugera V55HD head and had some questions regarding reliability issues, any mods, etc. First off, I have blown 3 fuses already, one the interior fuse and the back panel fuse twice. The interior fuse blew after switching the standby switch on after a break before the fourth set my bar band played one night. The external fuse blew when my 20 month old son turned the amp off while I was playing at home, so that's an obvious. Last night we played a 2 hour opening set, and towards the end of the set, the external fuse blew. I spoke to the local music store where I bought the amp after the first fuse blew, and I was informed that the local bars are notorious for having crappy wiring, and other guys have had problems. My concern and question is is this amp robust enough to be gigged at least twice weekly? I'm playing classic rock, country, some newer stuff as well, and I'm not running this amp anywhere near full bore. Would a power conditioner be a sound investment? Would it alleviate the fuse blowing under bar playing conditions? Any recommendations would be appreciated. I'm running into a Marshall JCM 800 4x12 by the way, and it really is a great sounding amp.
    12 months ago I bought my first 55 head and within a couple months I had to take it back to GC. It would rattle and buzz when I played through it. They swapped me out for another new head. This head has been fine over the past 10 months. Let me say that it has only been turned on about 20 times over the past 10 months. It sits in my home studio and never leaves the house. Last week it started crackling and cutting in and out. I would thump the top of the head with my finger and it would be ok for a second then do it again. It's got to be either a bad tube or just a loose connection. What I don't get is that it sits in the same spot, in the same room, never moves and is used very little. Up until now no problems. I love the clean sound of this amp but the od channel is really bad, in my opinion. Today I got an RA # and have to send the head to the authorized repair shop in Kentucky. With all this said, it's not just Bugera that's having lots of problems. Over the past year I have gone through 5 Egnator Rebel 20 and 30 heads, and 1 Orange Dual Terror. The Orange went back because I really like the Egnator sound and versitility. I am waiting on a new Rebel 30 head that is being sent straight from the California location, bypassing the GC distribution center. I hope it works. All of the Egnators were either bad right out of the box or developed a problem within days. It could very well be the tubes. Oh, Bugera told me that if I took the tubes out the warranty would be void because they are inclosed in a metal housing and only an authorized tech can take them out. I would love to sell the 55 head but don't think anyone would buy it for anywhere close to what I would feel comfortable getting for it.

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    Hey dwood and all,
    I got the amp back from the Bugera repair facility in Elizabethtown, KY back in February or March, and have gigged with it quite a bit since then, 2 to 3 night a week almost every week until last month. It has performed flawlessly. I really like this amp, it has the sound i was looking for. One mod that will be performed once the warranty runs out is changing one of the two footswitch functions from turning the reverb on and off to activating the boost function. This is my only beef with the amp right now, I like the boost feature, but it really needs to be footswitchable in my opinion.

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    Bugera V55HD

    Thanks for the reply. The repair shop in KY has the head now. The guy there seems to be really nice and confident. I'm waiting to hear what he found. I'll keep you informed. Thanks again!

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    Although I do not own a V55HD, I have played them at GC - very sweet sounding amp. I do own a Bugera 1990 and possibly my experience with it can help. Bugera is a budget amp brand (Behringer is the parent company). It is cheaply made, but it can be as reliable as any other amp. The most important thing any tube amp player can do is to find a reputable amp tech as near to where you live as possible. Fortunately for me here in Phoenix, I found Lowell Hunt of Hunt Amplification and he is outstanding. Anyway, tube amps are inherently very fragile and finicky devices that can get out of whack pretty easily. You could have a short in your circuit board, a bad transistor, a bad pre-amp tube, or most likely a bad power output tube. Always have back-up tubes with you when you gig, but it is a good idea to bring your amp in periodically to your amp tech for tune-ups every three-six months depending on how often you use it. When I played my 1990 and it got warmed up, it would start to make this weird whiney-hissy noise, then shut down. It did it repeatedly, so I brought it into Lowell and he fixed the problem in about 20 minutes. Since then, the amp has been rock-solid reliable. All tube amps need to be biased correctly as well, so you may want to have your V55hd bias set to specifications. An out of bias tube amp could prematurely burn out it's power tubes and possible blow fuses. I also own a Mesa Boogie MkIIb which has needed it's share of TLC through the years to keep sounding it's best. If all else fails, buy a Roland Micro Cube and don't worry about tubes. It is a great sounding little amp with a nice variety of tones. Rock on.

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    Hi guys...I realize that this is quite an old thread but I was wondering how the O.P. got on with his V55HD repairs?
    Has it been reliable since being repaired?....or did you simply sell it and replace it?
    I ask because I recently bought a V55 combo which promptly died after one day's use......just made a sound like caps popping and that was it...no more output.
    Luckily the owner of the music store I purchased it from is a buddy and I swapped the DOA for floor stock.
    As I figured Bugera do NOT burn their amps in at all because the floor stock amp has been running sweetly for a couple of weeks.
    I also own a Bugera 1990 which has been back to the shop 5 times in it's short lifetime.
    The most frustrating thing is that despite obviously poor QC at the factory these amps sound brilliant for very little cash.
    Saddly this isn't just isolated to Bugera as I had a brand new Marshall MGCF101 which died after a month of home usage....swapped it for the Bugera which died after one day lol.
    Loving the tone of the V55 though and am glad I stuck with Bugera

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    Senior Member Randall's Avatar
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    I'll chime in to this resurrected thread. I had one of these on my bench last year, and I thought it was a straight up piece of soulless crap. Aside from it's looks, I didn't like one single thing about it.

    And worrying about flipping the standby switch a few times a night seems to me like worrying about the wear and tear that switching your ignition on and off does to the engine. It might be a factor, but in both examples so is idle time, how hard you drive them, mechanical vibration, and how long you warm them up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Randall View Post
    I'll chime in to this resurrected thread. I had one of these on my bench last year, and I thought it was a straight up piece of soulless crap. Aside from it's looks, I didn't like one single thing about it.

    And worrying about flipping the standby switch a few times a night seems to me like worrying about the wear and tear that switching your ignition on and off does to the engine. It might be a factor, but in both examples so is idle time, how hard you drive them, mechanical vibration, and how long you warm them up.
    They sound good though....everything plugs into a PCB so I get that a point to point snob would get upset about things like that.
    Many players just want to be able to turn the amp on...use it...then turn it off without the fear of it never turning on again so there is a definite reliability issue....but as I stated...bang for buck they're a good sounding amp...when they work

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    Stray Cap DrGonz78's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dougiestyletone View Post
    Always have back-up tubes with you when you gig, but it is a good idea to bring your amp in periodically to your amp tech for tune-ups every three-six months depending on how often you use it. When I played my 1990 and it got warmed up, it would start to make this weird whiney-hissy noise, then shut down. It did it repeatedly, so I brought it into Lowell and he fixed the problem in about 20 minutes.
    After working on a Bugera 6260 I am not so certain how this relates to this amp... Although in the 6260 manual it reads to adjust the Bias about every 6 months. That is because of vibrations that cause the Bias Pot to move just a bit as it is just a small knob(pot). So get yourself set up to read the bias and set it to maintain these brands of amps. Other than that at least this 6260 was not full of surface mounted crap, I will give it that much. Now how this relates to V55HD is beyond me... lol. Either way I could not help myself.
    When the going gets weird... The weird turn pro!

  30. #30
    Senior Member Randall's Avatar
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    What you think sounds good, and what I think sounds good may be two different things, based on each of our experiences. But calling someone a point to point snob in your second post upon joining an electronics forum is bad form, and not appreciated.

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    Just to reiterate from post #8

    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck H View Post
    If you want a reliable and dependable road tool for shows you need to spend more than $350. By todays market it puts that amp on par with the likes of Kay and Harmony or even Sears store brand amps from back in the day. If your going to be professional you need to be able to finish a show without problems. Sometimes that requires an investment...

    Just my humble opinion. I know it's offensive but if your going to be disappointed in a budget product it should be kept in perspective.
    "I should have been born sooner. Of course, if I had been, I might be dead now." trem

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    Quote Originally Posted by Randall View Post
    What you think sounds good, and what I think sounds good may be two different things, based on each of our experiences. But calling someone a point to point snob in your second post upon joining an electronics forum is bad form, and not appreciated.
    You know as soon as I re-read that I thought it may have looked as though I was having a go at YOU and I certainly wasn't.
    I apologize if it came off that way because that was not my intent.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck H View Post
    Just to reiterate from post #8
    That's a fair enough statement.
    Particularly because Bugera are aiming at "the professional" end of the market and the QC is very hit and miss.
    But not everyone are pro musicians...in attitude perhaps but not always gigging wise.
    If an amp dies during "bedroom" use there's little inconvenience but I have had my 1990 die during rehearsals and gigs and yes it's painful when it happens.
    The main benefit I see from Bugera's price point is that with the global economic climate the amps we'd LIKE to own are almost always a financial stretch...so yes...spend a little more to get that brand name IF you have the cash but if not...there always has to be alternatives.

  34. #34
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    For the price you might even get two identical amps if you gig heavy. When I did it, if you gigged the amps were Marshall, Fender, Mesa and some odd ducks. Sorry if I skipped any ones favorite. I had two Marshalls of the same model. I bought the second after an on stage failure. That never happened again once I bought the backup though. And I'm glad because my backup didn't sound very good! "Same" amp, never sounded quite right. A problem you won't have with the Bugera. They all sound about the same for equivalent models. So there's something to that at least.
    "I should have been born sooner. Of course, if I had been, I might be dead now." trem

  35. #35
    Senior Member Randall's Avatar
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    Bugera is not aimed at the professional end of the market. It is aimed at beginners.

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