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Thread: 65 Gibson SG jr needs a new bridge. Help!

  1. #1
    Junior Member xMichaelx's Avatar
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    65 Gibson SG jr needs a new bridge. Help!

    The bridge on my 1965 Gibson SG jr is worn out. I looked on the internet but cant really find what I'm looking for. Theres talk about the original bridges were intonated for heavier gauge G string,I use 010 gauge strings. Where can I find a bridge for this guitar? One that will work with todays lighter gauge strings. Thanks.
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  2. #2
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    Allparts has several bridges that will work. Many Epiphone guitars come with a version of that bridge made for a plain G.
    Nickel Compensated Stop Tailpiece | Allparts.com
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  3. #3
    Pickup Maker David Schwab's Avatar
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    Here's a SG Jr bridge:

    STEWMAC.COM : SG Junior Bridge



    They state:

    ...in the original design for a wound G string and non-staggered mounting stud placement.
    Someone posted that this won't intonate with todays thinner strings. So this is like the original.

    So your other options are an adjustable bridge like these:

    STEWMAC.COM : Wilkinson/Gotoh Adjustable Bridge/Tailpiece

    STEWMAC.COM : Adjustable Wraparound Bridge

    STEWMAC.COM : Schroeder Stoptail Bridge

    There's more too:

    STEWMAC.COM : Electric guitar, non-trem tailpieces
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    Junior Member xMichaelx's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sweetfinger View Post
    Allparts has several bridges that will work. Many Epiphone guitars come with a version of that bridge made for a plain G.
    Nickel Compensated Stop Tailpiece | Allparts.com
    Yeah thats what I was looking for. A bridge thats made for an un wound G string. Theres two versions of this, one is made like the original thats for a wound G string, and the other is made for todays lighter gauge strings with a plane G string.

  5. #5
    Old Timer Gtr_tech's Avatar
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    I would use the adjustable version if it were me....just to have the best possible intonation.
    The farmer takes a wife, the barber takes a pole....

  6. #6
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    Also, that guitar will sound and stay in tune better if you just string it as a hardtail.
    John R. Frondelli
    dBm Pro Audio Services, New York, NY

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    Senior Member kleuck's Avatar
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    Pickup Maker David Schwab's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gtr_tech View Post
    I would use the adjustable version if it were me....just to have the best possible intonation.
    I agree! I can't take listening to those non adjustable bridges. Same with the three saddle Tele bridges. Those guitars always sound out of tune to me.
    It would be possible to describe everything scientifically, but it would make no sense; it would be without meaning, as if you described a Beethoven symphony as a variation of wave pressure. — Albert Einstein

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    Senior Member kleuck's Avatar
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    Adjustable wraps don't sound like wraps to my ears.

  10. #10
    Pickup Maker David Schwab's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kleuck View Post
    Adjustable wraps don't sound like wraps to my ears.
    How so?
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    Senior Member kleuck's Avatar
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    Sorry, as i'm french, i'm not sure to understand your question, but i suppose you are asking for more precisions
    In a few words : one piece/non adjustable wraparounds gives an obvious "acoustic" vibe where adjustable ones just do not.

  12. #12
    Pickup Maker David Schwab's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kleuck View Post
    Sorry, as i'm french, i'm not sure to understand your question, but i suppose you are asking for more precisions
    In a few words : one piece/non adjustable wraparounds gives an obvious "acoustic" vibe where adjustable ones just do not.
    That all depends on what the bridge is made of, and how heavy it is. If you get a lightweight adjustable bridge it will sound the same.

    Aluminum bridges sound very nice to me.
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    Senior Member kleuck's Avatar
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    Faber are aluminium indeed, i did not test adjustable wraps made of aluminium though.
    But i thik that all pieces of hardware are not aluminium right ?
    So i doubt the sound can be the same, i have an ash strat, where i replaced the standard saddles, and only them by plain steel ones, and all others things being equal, the sound is waaaaaaaaay different.
    I can't imagine it can be very different with an aluminium wrap with adjustable steel or brass saddles.
    But you're Right, my message wasn’t clear enough, i was talking about aluminum wraps, with brass ones, adjustable saddles or not doesn't give any difference, or very very light one.
    Last edited by kleuck; 08-26-2011 at 10:06 PM.

  14. #14
    Pickup Maker David Schwab's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kleuck View Post
    Faber are aluminium indeed, i did not test adjustable wraps made of aluminium though.
    But i thik that all pieces of hardware are not aluminium right ?
    So i doubt the sound can be the same, i have an ash strat, where i replaced the standard saddles, and only them by plain steel ones, and all others things being equal, the sound is waaaaaaaaay different.
    I can't imagine it can be very different with an aluminium wrap with adjustable steel or brass saddles.
    But you're Right, my message wasn’t clear enough, i was talking about aluminum wraps, with brass ones, adjustable saddles or not doesn't give any difference, or very very light one.
    Unless otherwise noted, most of the wrap around bridges and other Gibson bridge parts are made of zinc.

    If you had an aluminum bridge, you would probably want aluminum saddles. People often use steel saddles for more bite, or brass saddles for a warmer tone.

    But given the choice I'd rather have my guitar play in tune than to have a slight change in tone. Or I would make aluminum saddles.
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  15. #15
    Senior Member kleuck's Avatar
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    For me, compensated wraps are enough to have a well tuned guitar.
    tpwc.jpg

  16. #16
    Pickup Maker David Schwab's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kleuck View Post
    For me, compensated wraps are enough to have a well tuned guitar.
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    Unless you have perfect pitch. I can hear it.

    A fixed compensation bridge only works properly with one set gauge of strings and at a set action.

    Those bridges are junk. It was Gibson's way to not have to spend money on a proper bridge. Notice they put them on the cheap guitars. It's a tailpiece, it isn't even a bridge.
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  17. #17
    Senior Member kleuck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Schwab View Post
    Unless you have perfect pitch. I can hear it.

    A fixed compensation bridge only works properly with one set gauge of strings and at a set action.

    Those bridges are junk. It was Gibson's way to not have to spend money on a proper bridge. Notice they put them on the cheap guitars. It's a tailpiece, it isn't even a bridge.
    I always use the same set and action ; anyway i can't stand anymore the sound of brass or zinc TOM's (or wraps for thaht matter) -unless there’s a Bigsby or an aluminium stop-bar on the guitar- i find them too boomy, dull and compressed, where an aluminium wrap gives this awesome acoustic feeling (and is much more elegant and comfortable i think)
    Matter of taste of course.
    I would be glad though to test an adjustable & aluminium wrap, if you can provide me a link for a good one, i would be happy

    Edit : ho, i understand what you mean, and you're right, the Faber seems to be intended for 10-46 and medium to low action, where with my 9-42 / low action it is not that perfect, but what the hell, if you can't stand this little imperfection in tuning, you can't play any acoustic guitar neither ?

    Edit² : found one (and only) did you try this one ? http://www.stewmac.com/?PCR=1%3A100%...s&currencyid=7

    Edit3 : actually, some comments do not help : "-there is slop in the saddle contact and makes it prone to unwanted vibration and buzzes"
    Last edited by kleuck; 08-29-2011 at 04:38 PM.

  18. #18
    Supporting Member Steve A.'s Avatar
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    I've been playing several PRS SE guitars the past few years as my main squeeze and they all have "modern" compensated wraparound bridges. As someone else mentioned if you string the guitar with a 10-46 set they are pretty much in tune- at least good enough for rock and roll.

    It is a very light bridge, very possibly aluminum (I am not a metallurgist nor do I play one on TV). I'm of the opinion that an adjustable wraparound bridge could reduce the sustain if the individual pieces vibrate at all.

    I just ran across an interesting article that points out that the total string length (from ball end to tuner*) will determine the "feel" when you are bending notes:

    STRING TENSION AND TUNING by Ian Noycel

    A string with a total distance that is shorter will feel stiffer when you bend the notes. Which is not necessarily a bad thing- I think that a longer string that is easier to bend might be kind of "squishy". Like comparing a tube rectifier to a solid state rectifier in a guitar amp. I think a wraparound bridge can make your bends more responsive to your "finger english" since you are not spreading the tension from your fingers across a longer length.

    Yes, I know all of that sounds crazy- the article explains it much better than I can.

    Strange but true: even a guitar that is intonated perfectly will sound a little bit out of tune as you play different chords in different keys up and down the fretboard. That is because the famous "well-tempered scale" is not perfect- it is a compromise to allow all 12 diatonic scales to coexist. Good guitarists compensate for this, sometimes by minor adjustments of the tuning keys for a particular song but also by the pressure they use fretting each string. (If one note is slightly flat due to differences between the well-tempered scale and what is called "just intonation" they will bend it slightly to put it in tune.)

    "Just intonation" is based on the mathematical ratios between the 7 notes. For more information here is a link to the entry in Wikipedia:


    Just Intonation


    Steve Ahola

    P.S. I attached a picture of the new Vox guitars being handmade in Novato, CA. The bridge mounts to a single set of posts like a wraparound bridge but is adjustable like a tune-a-matic. A friend played one and they are very impressive (more sustain than any guitar he has ever played). But I think that they would sustain even better if it was a true non-adjustable wraparound bridge.

    * I am not sure how strings going through the body fit this equation. If there is a sharp bend before they enter the body, I doubt if much tension will be transferred to the length of string going through the body, since that bend is going to offer some resistance. BTW Jimi Hendrix stringing up his Strat backwards would have a big influence on the "feel" of bending strings. The top strings would feel stiffer when bending them (as per the article) but would also be less squishy and more responsive (my own take on things).
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  19. #19
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    Just a tip for using those bridges with that trem: wrap the low E string around the bridge and don't run it to the trem. The thing will never stay in tune with all six strings on the trem and now the bridge won't move every time you touch the bar.

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