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Thread: Source for mounting plates?

  1. #36
    Pickup Maker David Schwab's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedHouse View Post
    Damn that's funny!
    It would be possible to describe everything scientifically, but it would make no sense; it would be without meaning, as if you described a Beethoven symphony as a variation of wave pressure. — Albert Einstein

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  2. #37
    Member SKATTERBRANE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jason lollar View Post
    if you are willing to buy 50 or 100 pieces just go to david enginnering with a 2D cad drawing and have them cut it- they can deburr and tap the plates and plate them too for cheaper than you could buy them pre made if you could find the source
    David Engineering - Metal Stamping, LASER Cutting, Sheet Metal Fabrication
    Thank you Mr Lollar. I will look into that.
    The Pickup Artist

  3. #38
    Senior Member NightWinder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jason lollar View Post
    Now that's pretty funny! Plainly stated : )

  4. #39
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    Sketterbrane.... again proves himself the most self-entitled pickup builder in the market today. You ask a questions that will make YOUR job easier and get mad at people when they genuinely give you advice that you don't deem adequate.

    How about you go out and really try to find these parts - work the phone if you can - instead of just asking people to do your bidding for you... pathetic

  5. #40
    Old Timer RedHouse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Edward R View Post
    Sketterbrane.... again proves himself the most self-entitled pickup builder in the market today. You ask a questions that will make YOUR job easier and get mad at people when they genuinely give you advice that you don't deem adequate.

    How about you go out and really try to find these parts - work the phone if you can - instead of just asking people to do your bidding for you... pathetic
    Chill Mr 38-posts-Ed, your retort is marginally helpfull (and definately not timely a week later).

  6. #41
    Old Timer Possum's Avatar
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    Skatterbrane is actually one of the more truthful and honest builders I've run into. You won't find misinformation on his website or wild magical theories that have no basis in facts. He also makes good pickups and has a very good reputation among a wide market. Thumbs up from here ;-) Good man, RedHouse...
    http://www.SDpickups.com
    Stephens Design Pickups

  7. #42
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    I have the same situation in trying to retrofit mini-HB's in a P90 Les Paul. I'm sure you didn't mean to sound rude and ungrateful when you flipped off these people volunteering their time to help you, 5 years ago, but its how it came across to me, too. I hope you found a solution to the mounting bracket.

  8. #43
    ken
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    I know this is a real necropost, but there are some good points in here.

    I meant sometimes you have to actually make parts. It's equivalent to people buying parts from Warmoth and calling themselves a guitar maker. Or buying a table from Ikea and calling yourself a carpenter because you have to assemble it.
    It used to be that to make pickups you had to do a lot of the work yourself, like build your own bobbins and tooling, and even your own winder. For example, Duncan, Dimarzio, Fralin and Lollar all started out making all their own parts. Before I bought a copy of Jason's book, I didn't make whole pickups myself, and my rewinder was made from parts from an Erector set and a motor from an old tape recorder. No lie. I only started making my own pickup parts once I graduated from machinist school and got a job in a small machine shop... mostly for access to a lot of machines I couldn't afford.

    Nowadays, it's completely different. Everybody knows Stewmac among others sells winders and complete kits for the simpler pickups, like Teles, Strats and PAF's. Instead of spending days figuring out how to cut and bend a nickel silver humbucker baseplate with the tools you have on hand without messing it all up, you can order your choice of bases from lots of different vendors. For a minimum investment, just about anybody can make a pickup and sell it.

    It's refreshing to read that there are still obsessive people out there like me, who actually want to make every part of their pickups themselves instead of just ordering a bunch of parts off da web like 'everybody else'. Yes it's true that there are some parts that are almost impossible to make yourself, like Tele rhythm pickup or humbucker pickup covers. But there is a certain amount of pride involved in telling a player that the only part of that P90 pickup he loved the sound of so much that you didn't make was the screws and the magnets.

    Old fart rant over...

    ken

  9. #44
    ToneOholic! big_teee's Avatar
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    Good points Ken.
    This forum is big enough for all kinds of pickup builders and assemblers.
    I make a few one off pickups, but if you are making many, I prefer having the parts made.
    Forbon parts can be cut by several pickup parts sellers.
    You don't have to have your own laser, to make custom forbon pickups.
    Tone-Kraft will cut about anything you need, and at a reasonable price.
    Wind Your Own Pickups, Guitar Pickup Kits, Alnico Rod Magnets, Pickup Flatwork, Tone Kraft
    To me it is about tone, and as long as the parts are good quality, that's good enough!
    Same goes for baseplates!
    T

    **I made my blues playing grandson a parts caster in August.
    I used mainly WD parts, licensed Fender WD neck, and a beautiful Flame sunburst Alder body.
    I bought tuners, fender bridge tremelo, hand fitted a bone blank nut.
    Used a loaded pickguard I made from mainly Mojo parts, hand wired by me.
    Pickups were wound by me from mojo parts.
    It all took me several days. It turned out great and my GS loves it.
    So did I make anything, or not?
    Last edited by big_teee; 11-28-2017 at 07:58 PM.
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    Technicians Run the World, but Bankers, Lawyers, and Accountants, Take All The Credit!
    Keep Rockin! B_T
    Terry

  10. #45
    ken
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    Sorry about the double post. For some reason my computer should have saved as a draft what is now post #43, instead of posting it. Oops. Moderator, please remove the post #43 if possible.

    **I made my blues playing grandson a parts caster in August.
    I used mainly WD parts, licensed Fender WD neck, and a beautiful Flame sunburst Alder body. I bought tuners, fender bridge tremelo, hand fitted a bone blank nut. Used a loaded pickguard I made from mainly Mojo parts, hand wired by me. Pickups were wound by me from mojo parts. It all took me several days. It turned out great and my GS loves it. So did I make anything, or not?
    Yes, you made that guitar. The difference is you probably don't have the technology necessary to make all those parts by yourself, especially the neck... so you bought them. Then you gave it to your grandson. That's really cool. You didn't try to spin it as Jimi Hendrix's Second Coming and sell it on Ebay.

    Maybe I'm being a crotchety ole fart, but what I was trying to say was that it is now all too easy nowadays to buy a bunch of parts, hire a marketing major from the local community college to write ads, and BOOM! you're a pickup maker. I wish eloquent David was here, he could probably explain better than I can.

    I made my own guitars too, bodies and pickups anyways. Here are two of my older guitars. Now I can make everything but the neck, and I'm working on that now. Yes, I made the P90's on the one on the right, but couldn't make good baseplates with the tools I had at the time to justify mass production. I just bought the neccesary machines a month ago to make good P90 and humbucker baseplates myself. If I could find a good way to make my own Tele lead pickup baseplates or Strat pickup covers without all the issues, I'd be all over that too. 3D printing is still today too grainy for pickup covers or humbucker bobbins IMO. Too bad.

    BTW... anybody know where I can find say a 50 ton hydraulic punch press that runs on 240V single phase AC power and still fits under a 9 foot shop ceiling?

    2guitars.jpg


    Ken
    Last edited by ken; 11-29-2017 at 06:26 PM.

  11. #46
    ToneOholic! big_teee's Avatar
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    Sounds like You want it to be hard, and only the elite few can say they make pickups.
    The guitar player probably could care less, if you made the bobbin, or if the bobbin was made in a batch from china! lol
    Same thing with Linux computer guys of old.
    They want it to be hard to run linux, with command line skills required.
    Don't want Joe Blow to say he can run linux out of the box without skills!
    I'm all for making it easy.
    There is room for all of it, without shame!
    That's my two cents.
    Have fun everyone making pickups, however you do it!
    T
    Technicians Run the World, but Bankers, Lawyers, and Accountants, Take All The Credit!
    Keep Rockin! B_T
    Terry

  12. #47
    Member Alberto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ken View Post
    Sorry about the double post. For some reason my computer should have saved as a draft what is now post #43, instead of posting it. Oops. Moderator, please remove the post #43 if possible.



    Yes, you made that guitar. The difference is you probably don't have the technology necessary to make all those parts by yourself, especially the neck... so you bought them. Then you gave it to your grandson. That's really cool. You didn't try to spin it as Jimi Hendrix's Second Coming and sell it on Ebay.

    Maybe I'm being a crotchety ole fart, but what I was trying to say was that it is now all too easy nowadays to buy a bunch of parts, hire a marketing major from the local community college to write ads, and BOOM! you're a pickup maker. I wish eloquent David was here, he could probably explain better than I can.

    I made my own guitars too, bodies and pickups anyways. Here are two of my older guitars. Now I can make everything but the neck, and I'm working on that now. Yes, I made the P90's on the one on the right, but couldn't make good baseplates with the tools I had at the time to justify mass production. I just bought the neccesary machines a month ago to make good P90 and humbucker baseplates myself. If I could find a good way to make my own Tele lead pickup baseplates or Strat pickup covers without all the issues, I'd be all over that too. 3D printing is still today too grainy for pickup covers or humbucker bobbins IMO. Too bad.

    BTW... anybody know where I can find say a 50 ton hydraulic punch press that runs on 240V single phase AC power and still fits under a 9 foot shop ceiling?

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    Ken
    Next step could be building the 50 ton hydraulic punch press yourself
    Last edited by Alberto; 11-30-2017 at 02:29 PM.
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  13. #48
    Old Timer J M Fahey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alberto View Post
    Next step could be building the 50 ton hydraulic punch press yourself
    No need for *that*, yet you are not less of a "maker" by renting such an expensive and seldom used machine, if you make your own custom parts on it.

    I make speakers (among many other things) and I *do* rent the 50 ton hydraulic presses, once a month or every other month to stamp a batch of, say, 100 speaker frames or 200 magnet plate disks (out of 5/8" steel, mind you), in various sizes, from 4" sealed midrange units to 15" ones.

    Also smaller 10/12 ton mechanical presses to stamp my own metal corner protectors , strip handle endcaps and strips, rubber feet metal caps, etc.

    Also have own parts made on "revolver" or CNC lathes, again renting them (or to be more precise, renting shop time).

    The point being you make custom stuff for your oun use, either because it´s commercially unavailable, too expensive, or you just want your own vwrsion.

    Whether you own, rent or lease expensive machinery is not the main point.

    FWIW I sold my large WW2 vintage lathe, which allowed me to finish aluminum sandcast 18" speaker frames because I needed to free that room, and really was selling very very few 18" ones, but now I´m thinking about buying one of those bench hobby type lathe+mill+drill thingies (think UNIMAT) to custom make in a jiffy lots of small useful thingies.
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  14. #49
    rjb
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    Quote Originally Posted by big_teee View Post
    Sounds like You want it to be hard, and only the elite few can say they make pickups.
    The guitar player probably could care less, if you made the bobbin, or if the bobbin was made in a batch from china! lol
    I don't know whether this should make you feel better or worse... but FWIW, DiMarzio used to (maybe still does- I don't know or care) buy off-the-shelf bobbins. Wolfe has posted receipts here and in other forums.

    -rb
    In the land of the blind, the one-eyed man is deemed mad.

  15. #50
    Old Timer J M Fahey's Avatar
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    FWIW original/earliest Di Marzio bobbins (and baseplates ane everything else except wire and magnets) were made here in Argentina by a diemaker friend of mine, Juan Sousa.
    Alex from New York (who was actually Italo Argentine from Buenos Aires) ordered and paid for them to make the earliest "legal" non Gibson made Humbuckers, just when patent protection ended, called Alex T Specials.
    They can be visually identified because they have a small "T" engraved on the bobbin.
    They were wound by his shop Tech, Larry Di Marzio.

    Then Larry found an investor and started sailing on his own, I guess the first ones were still made on Argentine made hardware (doubt any other was available) and later he got his own custom dies.

    Alex eventually left the pickup making business.
    Juan Manuel Fahey

  16. #51
    Senior Member LtKojak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J M Fahey View Post
    FWIW original/earliest Di Marzio bobbins (and baseplates ane everything else except wire and magnets) were made here in Argentina by a diemaker friend of mine, Juan Sousa.
    Alex from New York (who was actually Italo Argentine from Buenos Aires) ordered and paid for them to make the earliest "legal" non Gibson made Humbuckers, just when patent protection ended, called Alex T Specials.
    They can be visually identified because they have a small "T" engraved on the bobbin.
    They were wound by his shop Tech, Larry Di Marzio.

    Then Larry found an investor and started sailing on his own, I guess the first ones were still made on Argentine made hardware (doubt any other was available) and later he got his own custom dies.

    Alex eventually left the pickup making business.
    Juan Manuel, who's making p'ups in Argentina?

    How's the market?

    Inquiring minds would like to know.
    Pepe aka Lt. Kojak
    Milano, Italy

  17. #52
    ken
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    Sounds like You want it to be hard, and only the elite few can say they make pickups. The guitar player probably could care less, if you made the bobbin, or if the bobbin was made in a batch from china! lol Same thing with Linux computer guys of old. They want it to be hard to run linux, with command line skills required.
    That's not what I meant, but I can see how it could be misconstrued that way.

    I also dabble in making effects pedals and an occasional amp from time to time. The effects pedal industry is a lot like the pickup one, as nowadays you can order a circuit board for a 'compressor' or a 'chorus' or whatever from a supplier, a box from another, and pots from a third. The problem is that almost everybody seems to be making their creations from the exact same premade PC boards, cases, etc. as everybody else, and the only thing that really differentiates one pedal of a type from another seems to be the artwork. Don't believe me? Prowl around some of their forums for awhile.

    We have the same problem... if everybody who makes humbuckers for example buys their bobbins, baseplates, covers etc. from the same vendor, how do you differentiate your own works from everybody else? Those of us who make their own parts (or try to) can at least take comfort in knowing that we are trying to offer a pickup not exactly the same as everybody else's.

    For me, the people who buy a bunch of random parts and a winder off Ebay, sell some pickups, call themselves boutique winders, and drop out of biz in six months are really giving the rest of us a bad name. It's not easy to sell pickups to people who bought pickups from people on the Web in June, had them break in July, only to find out their new pickups are junk because the maker quit making them a week or two ago and won't answer his phone. (True story from one of my customers).

    And don't get me started on Linux... My last Linux laptop ran Mint, and every time I tried to do something cool with it I kept having to go into 'command line'. Drove me bats.

    ken

  18. #53
    Old Timer J M Fahey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LtKojak View Post
    Juan Manuel, who's making p'ups in Argentina?

    How's the market?

    Inquiring minds would like to know.
    Ciao Peppe
    These guys are doing quite well :
    D S P I C K U P S

    If anything, browse what they have and comment on what you see, I am not into pickups by any means (I only write something here now and then if related to magnets, magnetism, etc. but nothing further, not my area) and would love to know what real Pros think about what my friends are doing here.

    AFAIK most components are imported, probably Korean, but wouldn´t be surprised at all if they had own custom made dies; IF a model is successful they "should" at least sell 500 to 2000 units in the first couple years, and that always justifies the investment, so .....
    Last edited by J M Fahey; 12-01-2017 at 06:40 AM.
    Juan Manuel Fahey

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