Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 106 to 140 of 142
Like Tree90Likes

Thread: Useful tools

  1. #106
    Supporting Member eschertron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Great Black Swamp
    Posts
    1,460
    Quote Originally Posted by Richard View Post
    When you use a good prybar you will wonder why you ever used a screwdriver.
    You mean when beating the snot out of the amp chassis you've been struggling with?
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Conner View Post
    If it still won't get loud enough, it's probably broken.

  2. #107
    Senior Member Enzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Lansing, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    28,020
    I have a good prybar, one of those flat deals that also can pull nails. It is useful because of its width, less likely to dent the wood. But a lot of times it is too big for a job. Like getting under the corner of a grille in a combo, or whatever. So a screwdriver gets drafted. I got free screwdriver sets from HF, so if I bend one, oh well.
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

  3. #108
    Supporting Member Steve A.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    3,820
    Quote Originally Posted by Richard View Post
    It's not useful for amp work, but a good prybar set is useful. If I mess up a screwdriver I feel like I've abused the tool and the Craftsman guy is gonna give me the look when I return it. If I bend a prybar I expect him to be intimidated. When you use a good prybar you will wonder why you ever used a screwdriver.
    I have prybars but they are too heavy to drag up to a rooftop in my 30 lb shoulder bag. The Xcelite 99 screwdriver set is great for many things but definitely for not prying open panels, etc. For that I'd carry up a Craftsman #41587 5/16" x 8" screwdriver which has never let me down. Heck, I use them inside tube amps to make sure that big filter caps stay discharged...





    Sears.com


    Another must-have tool in my 30 lb shoulder bag was 12" Knipex channel locks. Much lighter than regular channel locks and you could use it as a pipe wrench. Even worked as a lightweight hammer but I made sure not to damage my tools... those suckers are expensive!





    Steve Ahola

  4. #109
    rjb
    rjb is offline
    Old Timer
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Somewhere near Bawlmer, Merlin
    Posts
    2,077
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve A. View Post
    Even worked as a lightweight hammer but I made sure not to damage my tools... those suckers are expensive!
    Did someone say lightweight hammer?
    I always carry one of these in my gigbag.


  5. #110
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    503
    I never had to carry tools everywhere so I never gave weight much consideration, the Knipex stuff is super nice, though. I have their piano wire cutters, will cut up to 1/8".

  6. #111
    Senior Member Enzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Lansing, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    28,020
    A lot of tools will cut piano wire, but not many will cut it a second time.
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

  7. #112
    Supporting Member Chuck H's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    pacific north west
    Posts
    11,773
    Quote Originally Posted by rjb View Post
    Did someone say lightweight hammer?
    I always carry one of these in my gigbag.

    Ah, the SM58. "I've" never managed to break one!!! Accidental drops, crushings and poor environmental conditions resulting in dents (large and small) scratches and oxidation and I've never had one NOT work, correctly!!! I can believe that someone, somewhere has actually used one as a hammer. Right before a gig. And then matter of factly plugged it in with NO apprehension.
    Richard and rjb like this.
    "I've heard magic defined as "a technology you don't understand". By that aphorism, the folks in this forum are practicing wizards, able to summon AND control the lightning demon, and make charms to allow others to use the demon in certain ways." R.G.

    "...less ear-friendly but handy for jazz." Leo_Gnardo

  8. #113
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    503
    Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
    A lot of tools will cut piano wire, but not many will cut it a second time.
    I've got some tiny dikes that I use for guitar strings so I can cut close and not get into the headstock, but if someone used them on bass strings it would be like using mom's sewing shears on paper.

  9. #114
    Senior Member Enzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Lansing, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    28,020
    Oooohhh, did I ever get scolded for that one. Not nearly as bad as when I used her pinking shears on paper.

    pinking-shears-scissors-6050438.jpg
    Chuck H, sgelectric and g1 like this.
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

  10. #115
    Supporting Member The Dude's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Sioux Falls, SD
    Posts
    4,234
    Same sort of deal here. My dad was a barber. You didn't dare use a barber scissors on paper!
    Richard and sgelectric like this.
    “Yeah, well, you know, that’s just, like, your opinion, man.”

  11. #116
    Supporting Member Steve A.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    3,820

    Rockler Sandpaper Cutter $12.99

    For $12.99 the Rockler sandpaper cutter is very handy and a fairly good deal unless you have to pay a lot for shipping. Gone are the days when your wife asks accusingly "You haven't been using my good scissors for cutting sandpaper again, have you?" Or possibly even worse: tearing them in half by hand after folding them to make a crease...

    http://www.rockler.com/rockler-sandpaper-cutter


    .

    .
    .


    Steve Ahola

    P.S. There are plenty of DIY projects to build your own cutter if you search for "sandpaper cutter"...

    P.P.S. If you order it from Amazon the shipping charge is $3.99 (same as a CD from a 3rd party seller there which IMO is outrageous!) Same price as ordering it from Rockler website... and they take PayPal (which Amazon doesn't.) I am fortunate to have a Rockler store in town which is on the way to my son's apartment. BTW I didn't see their sandpaper cutter the last time I was in their store so it is probably a fairly new item.

    https://www.amazon.com/Rockler-Sandp.../dp/B00JPCEWPI
    Last edited by Steve A.; 08-31-2016 at 01:13 AM.
    Richard likes this.

  12. #117
    Supporting Member Steve A.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    3,820
    Quote Originally Posted by Richard View Post
    I've got some tiny dikes that I use for guitar strings so I can cut close and not get into the headstock, but if someone used them on bass strings it would be like using mom's sewing shears on paper.
    Me, too, but I forget to mark them as such so I have a whole sh^tload of questionable Hakko cutters...

    Steve

  13. #118
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    503
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve A. View Post
    Me, too, but I forget to mark them as such so I have a whole sh^tload of questionable Hakko cutters...

    Steve
    That's the worst, Still useful but not what it should be. Just not quite trash.

  14. #119
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    503
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve A. View Post
    Me, too, but I forget to mark them as such so I have a whole sh^tload of questionable Hakko cutters...

    Steve
    That's the worst, Still useful but not what it should be. Just not quite trash.

  15. #120
    Old Timer Leo_Gnardo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Dogpatch-on-Hudson
    Posts
    4,270
    Quote Originally Posted by Richard
    I've got some tiny dikes that I use for guitar strings so I can cut close and not get into the headstock,
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve A. View Post
    Me, too, but I forget to mark them as such so I have a whole sh^tload of questionable Hakko cutters...
    Those little Hakko nippers are great, as long as you use 'em only on copper wire and small component leads only. Guitar strings, no way. Bass? You gotta be kidding! For strings I've been using full size dikes (diagonal cutters), a pair that cost me under $10 has lasted 25+ years so far so good, showing no nicks in the blades after cutting thousands of strings.

    And I got a mini-dikes from Parts Express on special a couple years ago, dead cheap only $5. I avoid using those minis on steel string wire. They're quite nicely made especially for the price, and I even use 'em to cut my nails.

  16. #121
    Supporting Member Steve A.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    3,820
    Quote Originally Posted by Leo_Gnardo View Post
    Those little Hakko nippers are great, as long as you use 'em only on copper wire and small component leads only. Guitar strings, no way...
    They work great but it kinda ruins them for electronic work. I get them from Frys when their special promo code brings the price down to $2.49 or $2.99. I'll put a rubber band on a pair to keep them closed and keep 'em in my "go to" bag.

    For strings I've been using full size dikes (diagonal cutters), a pair that cost me under $10 has lasted 25+ years so far so good, showing no nicks in the blades after cutting thousands of strings.
    Diff'rent strokes for diff'rent folks, I guess. I try to keep the big cutters away from my guitars... anything that will take out a big chunk if I drop 'em on it by mistake. Not that I would do that intentionally...

    Steve

    P.S. I like to put that "special twist"* in unwound strings to keep them from slipping so I will also use a small pair of needle nose pliers, preferably the bent kind and optionally with the cutter portion for .009s to .018s.

    * For the top 3 strings on a LP I will thread the string through the hole and then wrap it half a turn CCW and then under the incoming part of the string and finally pull it back sharply CW. Once I pre-stretch the strings they usually stay in tune.

  17. #122
    Supporting Member Chuck H's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    pacific north west
    Posts
    11,773
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve A. View Post
    P.S. I like to put that "special twist"* in unwound strings to keep them from slipping so I will also use a small pair of needle nose pliers, preferably the bent kind and optionally with the cutter portion for .009s to .018s.

    * For the top 3 strings on a LP I will thread the string through the hole and then wrap it half a turn CCW and then under the incoming part of the string and finally pull it back sharply CW. Once I pre-stretch the strings they usually stay in tune.
    I just hate the lumpy look of an underwrap. Dan Torres use to solder the ball end wrap on plain strings and said it keeps them in tune better for non locking trem systems. Maybe. I do know that the steel properties are affected at soldering temperatures and I'd be worried about breakage due to softening or reduction of elasticity. One thing I've wanted to try is lightly sanding the tuning key end of the plain strings to add grip. Maybe next string change
    "I've heard magic defined as "a technology you don't understand". By that aphorism, the folks in this forum are practicing wizards, able to summon AND control the lightning demon, and make charms to allow others to use the demon in certain ways." R.G.

    "...less ear-friendly but handy for jazz." Leo_Gnardo

  18. #123
    Supporting Member Steve A.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    3,820

    Soft Touch Pliers - from IPS in Japan

    Soft Touch Pliers... the greatest tool since sliced bread! Rather than wrapping the jaws of your slip joint pliers with duct tape or your wife's lingerie these pliers have replaceable plastic inserts to securely hold items without scratching them.



    I just learned about this brand new tool in an email from StewMac (hooray for spam!) As of this moment it seems to be cheapest at Amazon ($13.90), at least if you qualify for free shipping.

    https://www.amazon.com/PH-165-Non-ma.../dp/B001V7DYSQ

    I got mine from eBay with free 2 day shipping but their price just went up to $16.39.

    FREE 2 DAY SHIPPING: IPS PH-165 Non-marring Plastic Jaw Soft Touch Slip Joint | eBay

    However only StewMac has the replaceable jaw inserts listed for $5.95 (their item #1720 — or #1719 for the pliers.)



    Soft Touch Pliers | stewmac.com

    So far, so good but I've only taken them for a short test drive. BTW there are several different pliers listed on the packaging including needle nose and water pump pliers. And they are made in Japan so you don't have to worry about our trade deficit with China!

    Steve A.


    s-l400-1-.jpg

    screenshot_2017-08-07-08-36-57.jpg
    Last edited by Steve A.; 08-07-2017 at 08:15 PM.

  19. #124
    Supporting Member Chuck H's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    pacific north west
    Posts
    11,773
    Need two like buttons! Of course, I'll probably continue wrapping my plain old pliers with tape for a while But it's a great idea whose time has come.
    Justin Thomas likes this.
    "I've heard magic defined as "a technology you don't understand". By that aphorism, the folks in this forum are practicing wizards, able to summon AND control the lightning demon, and make charms to allow others to use the demon in certain ways." R.G.

    "...less ear-friendly but handy for jazz." Leo_Gnardo

  20. #125
    g1
    g1 is offline
    don't forget the joker g1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Canada, somewhere north of Fargo
    Posts
    8,696
    Are those plastic inserts more like hard slippery plastic, or softer grippy rubber?
    Certified Dotard

  21. #126
    rjb
    rjb is offline
    Old Timer
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Somewhere near Bawlmer, Merlin
    Posts
    2,077
    Not to rain on the parade, but soft jaw pliers are nothing new.
    Different configurations have been used by plumbers, jewelers and mechanics for <I dunno; fill in a time period>.

    https://www.google.com/search?q=nylo...w=1242&bih=609

    https://www.google.com/search?q=plas...w=1242&bih=609

    https://www.google.com/search?q=soft...w=1242&bih=609

    That being said, I do wish I owned a pair or two.

    -rb

  22. #127
    Old Timer
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Chill-Ville, VA
    Posts
    2,076
    Quote Originally Posted by g1 View Post
    Are those plastic inserts more like hard slippery plastic, or softer grippy rubber?
    They should come with different hardnesseseseseseseses, and be interchangeable. But if they're smart little capitalists, they'll do like the razor companies and charge as much for different inserts as for the handle itself...

    Damn it, don't send them that idea!

    Justin
    Last edited by Justin Thomas; 08-08-2017 at 08:32 PM.
    "Are you practicing in the lobby of the municipal library? It's still a guitar amp and it SHOULD make some noise (!!!)" - Chuck H. -
    "When receiving a shock I emit a strange loud high pitched girlish squeak." - Alex R -
    "All I ever managed to do with that amp was... kill small rodents within a 50 yard radius of my practice building." - Tone Meister -

  23. #128
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    British Columbia
    Posts
    233
    I'm a wee bit surprised that nobody has mentioned a security bit set. Like this one, for example: https://www.princessauto.com/en/deta...et/A-p8583023e

    Not so long ago, you only needed these for miniature electronics devices made by control-freak manufacturers like Apple Corp. Nowadays I find those stupid security screws on all sorts of oddball things - like the virtually new cheap Chinese-made snow-blower my buddy found abandoned on the sidewalk last winter. (The only thing wrong with it was that the internal on-off switch had slipped slightly out of alignment with the external waterproof cover, but you couldn't open it to fix it unless you had the right security bit.)

    Another must-have tool on my list (also not mentioned on this thread so far) is a spring-loaded automatic centre punch, like this one: Lisle Corporation . I use mine all the time to allow me to drill accurately placed holes.

    Here in Canada, you also need a set of Robertson screwdrivers (or Robertson bits for your multi-bit screwdriver). I love Robertson screws - the square-drive head never strips, and they stay put on the tip of your screwdriver while you get them started. But they are a Canada-only thing, because an unscrupulous company swindled the inventor, after which he refused to let them be manufactured except directly under his control. For those who've never encountered the original "no slip" screw design, here goes: Robertson Website - Home Page

    -Gnobuddy
    Steve A. and g1 like this.

  24. #129
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Pace, FL
    Posts
    1,176
    Quote Originally Posted by Gnobuddy View Post
    I'm a wee bit surprised that nobody has mentioned a security bit set. Like this one, for example: https://www.princessauto.com/en/deta...et/A-p8583023e

    Not so long ago, you only needed these for miniature electronics devices made by control-freak manufacturers like Apple Corp. Nowadays I find those stupid security screws on all sorts of oddball things - like the virtually new cheap Chinese-made snow-blower my buddy found abandoned on the sidewalk last winter. (The only thing wrong with it was that the internal on-off switch had slipped slightly out of alignment with the external waterproof cover, but you couldn't open it to fix it unless you had the right security bit.)

    Another must-have tool on my list (also not mentioned on this thread so far) is a spring-loaded automatic centre punch, like this one: Lisle Corporation . I use mine all the time to allow me to drill accurately placed holes.

    Here in Canada, you also need a set of Robertson screwdrivers (or Robertson bits for your multi-bit screwdriver). I love Robertson screws - the square-drive head never strips, and they stay put on the tip of your screwdriver while you get them started. But they are a Canada-only thing, because an unscrupulous company swindled the inventor, after which he refused to let them be manufactured except directly under his control. For those who've never encountered the original "no slip" screw design, here goes: Robertson Website - Home Page

    -Gnobuddy
    We use those in the cabinet shop for assembling the faceplates. Another common place you will find them are in Mobile Home trailers.

    nosaj

  25. #130
    Old Timer
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Cheshire, UK
    Posts
    1,543
    Quote Originally Posted by Gnobuddy View Post
    Another must-have tool on my list (also not mentioned on this thread so far) is a spring-loaded automatic centre punch
    I have one of those. I once loaned it to a colleague at work. He said it was useless. I found out later he was hitting it with a hammer.

  26. #131
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Pace, FL
    Posts
    1,176
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave H View Post
    I have one of those. I once loaned it to a colleague at work. He said it was useless. I found out later he was hitting it with a hammer.
    Should've center punched him between the eyes. Hey look at that it works.


    I have a 66/110 punchdown tool I got the center punch adapter for it years ago. You can't get them at Home Depot Ideal makes them,
    nosaj
    Justin Thomas likes this.

  27. #132
    Senior Member Enzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Lansing, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    28,020
    I love my automatic center punch, in fact they are something I give as a gift to someones "shop-opening".

    I second the square drive, here in the USA I have carried one for decades.

    When I worked in the coin-operated amusements field I carried all manner of security bits.
    Steve A. and Richard like this.
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

  28. #133
    Supporting Member Steve A.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    3,820

    A small 300 watt heat gun... really nice!

    A small 300 watt heat gun... really nice!



    1x 110V 300W Heat Gun Shrink Hot Air Temperature Electric Power Nozzles DIY Tool | eBay

    For heat shrink tubing I'll usually just use a disposable lighter or my small plastic butane heat gun if I can find it and it actually has fuel. Or if I'm industrious I might even get out my butane soldering iron and switch to the hot air tip.

    If I couldn't find anything else I might even get out my 5 year old 1500 watt hot air gun from Harbor Freight ($13.99) since I just burned out my 30 year old Craftsman hot air gun ($60) by not noticing that the fan didn't come on when I switched it on... ouch! Probably just a bad thermal limit switch but is it really worth the time and effort to track down the part and install it since the HF one works fine (and I have a million other projects already on my to-do list.)

    96289_zzz_500.jpg

    https://www.harborfreight.com/1500-w...112-96289.html

    I bought a 350 watt TechTron heat gun awhile back from Frys on a promo ad special for around 10 bucks but hadn't even bothered to cut it out of the clear plastic clamshell packaging that we all know and love so well...

    In case you are wondering about the actual size of the hot air they included this very helpful drawing...

    31a1jj8jmil.jpg

    Wow! If you use heat shrink tubing more than occasionally I recommend this very highly. It is small and light, and has a protective plastic hood over the metal nozzle and a wire stand to protect your table or workbench.

    Steve A.


    P.S. The stainless steel bearings are really slick!

    s-l1600.jpg

    Description:
    • Can be used to heating relief powder and shrinkable sheet.
    • Keeping 3-5cm distance from work and about a 45 degree angle to heat until it is completed.
    • After completion, use the heat gun at high temperature to blow a few minutes, it not only can add its hardness, but also its brightness.
    • The temprature can not adjustable, in theory, it can reach at 200 degree within a few seconds.

    Specification:
    • Size: 24cm length
    • Working temp.: 200 ℃
    • Rated Power: 300W
    • Rated voltage: 110V
    • Type: Constant temp. hot air gun
    • Plug Type: US Plug
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 71o4xeoyy1l._sx355_.jpg   96289_zzz_500.jpg   31a1jj8jmil.jpg   s-l1600.jpg  
    g1 likes this.

  29. #134
    Supporting Member Steve A.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    3,820

    Japanese flush cut pull saws

    I bought one of these a few years ago thinking it might come in handy cutting dowels in luthiery work like replacing or moving bridge bushings. I finally got around to using it when remounting a latch on the garbage enclosure for the 4-plex I live in. I *had* thought of using my Dremel tool with a 2" cut-off blade but I figured what the heck...

    It worked very well. To use it to cut dowels on a guitar top without damaging the finish a template (plastic, cardboard, thick paper) with a hole the size of the dowel could be used — cut the dowel a tad short and then tap it in with a rubber mallet. You could also sand down the finish using a thinner template so it would be nice and smooth once you tap it in. (If you are going to drill out the dowel anyway you could insert a wood screw to remove the dowel.)

    BTW don't cheap out and buy a pine dowel from a hardware store — find a store that sells oak or other hard wood dowels!



    https://www.harborfreight.com/12-in-...saw-62118.html
    Use #155638 for replacement blade.

    Seeing how well this $8.99 saw worked I wish I would have spent an extra $10 to get a *real* one made in Japan from Amazon. The handle on this one rotates so you can drop it 90° to make it more like a hacksaw.



    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000CEF5HM/

    Steve A.

    P.S. Reading the user reviews I learned that many apartment dwellers without a workshop in a garage use these saws for all sorts of things.


    image_25041-1-.jpg

    image_16120.jpg
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails image_25041-1-.jpg   image_16120.jpg  
    Last edited by Steve A.; 08-27-2017 at 10:14 PM.

  30. #135
    Supporting Member Chuck H's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    pacific north west
    Posts
    11,773
    Using a quality model (made in Japan?) I've seen carpenters cut the bottoms of door casings to match a floor profile ALL DAY and then put the saw back in their tool box for the next service. Super sharp and made of quality steel that should stay sharp for many uses. Likely impossible to re sharpen effectively, so you just buy a new one (after a couple of years?). Again, spooky sharp. Be careful.
    Steve A. likes this.
    "I've heard magic defined as "a technology you don't understand". By that aphorism, the folks in this forum are practicing wizards, able to summon AND control the lightning demon, and make charms to allow others to use the demon in certain ways." R.G.

    "...less ear-friendly but handy for jazz." Leo_Gnardo

  31. #136
    Supporting Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    2,830
    I used to visit a superb tool shop and they were stuffed with high-quality Japanese woodworking tools alongside the best tools you could buy from around the world. I bought plenty of stuff from them over the years, but they sadly closed their doors. When I asked the guy who owned it, he said he made 6% profit and the banks were paying 7.5%, so it wasn't worth the trouble. That was the first time I saw Japanese pull saws, as well as the laminated chisels that had their funky sharpening technique - some cost a week's wages at the time, just for a single chisel.
    Steve A. likes this.

  32. #137
    Supporting Member Steve A.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    3,820
    Most of the useful tools mentioned here so far are ones that we might use around the house, the garage or the shop, which is great. However, I like to bring along a small go-to bag filled with the essential tools to work on my guitars, etc., wherever I might be.

    For starters I've been a big fan of the CLC clip-on bags for at least 20 years. They come in 3 sizes:* 9" x 7", 7" x 6" and 6" x 5".



    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0002YVBC0/

    Picquic is a Canadian company and they make some really great screwdrivers and bits. Their Teeny Turner comes with 7 tiny bits:* Phillips (00, 0), Slotted (2mm, 3mm), Torx (T5, T6, T8). Unlike precision screwdrivers* you can deliver quite a bit of torque with the bigger handle.



    https://www.amazon.com/Picquic-06102.../dp/B001QVPHBO

    Picquic makes a larger version —the 91102 Stubby— with 6 bits: 1/4" flat, 3/16" flat, #1 Phillips, #2 Phillips, #3 Phillips, and a Torx T15. (Yes, if you get these two drivers you do not get a T10 bit, something that you will just need to live with. Get over it... * )



    https://www.amazon.com/Picquic-91102...dp/B00QC21LEE/

    Steve A.

    EDIT: Looking in my bag I find 4 hex key sets from Bondhus (Gorilla Grip), both metric and SAE, both fold-up and long handles (no ball end! I hate ball end wrenches for working on guitars...)

    f4573f7b-37b0-42bf-97eb-698589ffc04d.jpgbondhus-allen-wrench-set-167-p.jpgf3f01e55-55e2-426d-a2cd-cf40c98916d0.jpg

    https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_n...ywords=bondhus

    BTW although all of the links in this post are to Amazon that is *only* for reference... you can usually find better prices elsewhere.
    One more must-have-with-me-at-all-times item, the Stanley FatMax 6 Foot Keychain Tape Measure. This is a *real* tape measure that will fit in the "penny pocket" in your jeans...





    screenshot_2017-09-09-18-55-55.jpgpace3-976180enh-z7.jpg
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 91003072.jpg  
    Last edited by Steve A.; 09-10-2017 at 04:19 AM.

  33. #138
    Supporting Member Steve A.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    3,820
    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck H View Post
    Using a quality model (made in Japan?) I've seen carpenters cut the bottoms of door casings to match a floor profile ALL DAY and then put the saw back in their tool box for the next service. Super sharp and made of quality steel that should stay sharp for many uses. Likely impossible to re sharpen effectively, so you just buy a new one (after a couple of years?). Again, spooky sharp. Be careful.
    Yes, you can't resharpen the ones I've seen but some of them do have replaceable blades...

  34. #139
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    British Columbia
    Posts
    233
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve A. View Post
    Picquic is a Canadian company and they make some really great screwdrivers and bits. Their Teeny Turner comes with 7 tiny bits
    <snip>
    Agreed! I discovered Picquic when I moved to BC a few years ago, and a Teeny Turner has been in the little box of goodies I take to every guitar jam, along with things like a Snark tuner, spare picks, strings, 9V batteries, AA cells, et cetera. Like the Snark, the Teeny Turner looks deceptively like other similar products, but when you use it, you find it's exceptionally well made and really good at what it's designed to do.

    I have two progressively larger sizes of Picquics in the home tool-box as well.

    -Gnobuddy

  35. #140
    Supporting Member Steve A.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    3,820
    Quote Originally Posted by Gnobuddy View Post
    I have two progressively larger sizes of Picquics in the home tool-box as well.
    Me, too! My favorite is the Picquic X-7 SixPac Plus because you can use the heavy duty bits in a cordless screwdriver. In fact I was first looking at the Picquic bit sets at Fry's when I figured out that I could get the X-7 for not that much more.



    https://www.amazon.com/Picquic-X-7-M.../dp/B0018IV8WM

    Today's challenge: Say "Picquic bit sets" very quickly 6 times in a row.
    Tomorrow's challenge: Say "Picquic bit sets very quickly 6 times in a row" very quickly 6 times in a row.
    Tuesday's challenge... forget it!!!

    Speaking of bits I found some 3-1/2" and 6" long power bits from Enkay Products at Fry's awhile back and found them to be very useful for getting at those screws that are buried WAY back, where you might use a 6" screwdriver but just can't torque it enough...

    Here is a list of their power bits from Page 22 of their catalog (attached below). The stock #'s listed are for 10 packs in bulk. You need to add "-2C" for the carded 2-packs for retail sale. BTW on Page 15 of their catalog you can find their 2" cut-off blade kits with heavy duty mandrels (eat yer heart out, Mr. Dremel!)

    BTW the typical prices at Amazon and eBay for these bits are OUTRAGEOUS! Like $12 for two bits that cost me $3 or $4 at Fry's. Last I checked they were not made of gold....



    http://music-electronics-forum.com/a...p;d=1505033511

    EDIT I found an on-line store that handles a lot of Enkay items but not the aforementioned bits. I could not get the shipping charges using my tablet (I clicked but it did not respond. )

    Enkay Products : Micro Center

    61nyfbffaxl._sy355_.jpgscreenshot_2017-09-10-02-05-03.jpgscreenshot_2017-09-10-02-05-03_20170910023440936.jpg
    Last edited by Steve A.; 09-12-2017 at 09:31 AM.

Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Tools of the trade...
    By Steve A. in forum Lobby
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 06-23-2014, 10:03 PM
  2. Spiffy hand tools
    By Enzo in forum Music Electronics
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 01-10-2014, 09:37 AM
  3. Concerning advice on tools, if you please. km6x7.
    By tonequester in forum Music Electronics
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 07-06-2012, 09:36 PM
  4. tools for punching forbon, part 1
    By DoctorX in forum Pickup Makers
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-16-2011, 01:26 AM
  5. Eylets and staking tools, again
    By Ptron in forum Build Your Amp
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 06-14-2009, 08:36 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •