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Thread: Useful tools

  1. #1
    Senior Member Enzo's Avatar
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    Useful tools

    I was looking through harbor Freight a minute ago for something specific, but it made me think to list a few very useful items they sell cheap.

    Hooks and picks are useful for popping fuses from clips, popping ICs from sockets, fishing TO3s from sockets, tightening tube socket pins, pulling cotters, etc. The small end hooks are good for spring pulling, like fishing the end of a reverb corner spring back into the hole. There are more than these two, and certainly other places sell them, hardware stores, auto parts stores, etc.

    4 Piece Pick and Hook Set
    2 Piece O-Ring Hook Scribe Set

    Outlet tester, everyone should have one, especially on the road

    Electric Receptacle Tester

    Caliper, though I tend to call it a micrometer, a little plastic measuring thingie. I use it all the time. is that a 24mm or 16mm pot? Whhat size is that tactile switch? What is the travel length of that slider? What is the length and height of that can cap? And so on. Hey, for $3, you can't lose.

    6" Utility Caliper

    A couple good mallets. I like to use my fist to whack the top of an amp, but that hurts if I try to whack say the end of a Fender chassis, so a good rubber mallet and a soft face mallet are great. Soft face is plastic. I use the larger rubber one - unless the other one is closer - for banging on cabs to find loosenesses, or to pop PV Velcro grilles back on firmly. I am more likely to use the plastic one on chassis ends and such. They come in several shapes and sizes.

    1-1/2 lb. Soft Face Mallet
    1-1/2 lb. Rubber Mallet

    A hand rivet tool. I use it more than you might think. here is the entry level one

    Hand Riveter Set

    Tweezers. Oh geez, good for fishing a nut out from under something, and sometimes holding a nut in a small space to get a screw started in it. I bought one of those self closing ones, the fourth one over in the link, over 50 years ago, and it stil serves me. Hold a wire in place to solder, or hold a component steady.

    6 Pc Fine Point Tweezer Set

    Xacto knife. Endless uses. Slicing heat shrink off something, slicing silicone away, opening plastic wrapped packages, splitting box tape, trimming loose tolex ends

    13 Piece Precision Knife Set

    Pin punches. I use them more for alignments than actual pin punching. They are made for driving roll pins out of their holes. That is why they come in sizes. Sometimes you have to push the pin out the other side, and the punch needs to reach all the way through the hole. But I get more use aligning holes. Drop a heavy 15" speaker into the baffle opening, then the punch through the mount hole allows you to move the thing around some more easily than by hand. Or getting a chassis holes to line up with the cab top holes, poke a pin punch down through the cab top and into the chassis hole and you can keep the thing in place while starting the other screws.

    5 Piece Long Drive Pin Punch Set

    If you don't know what a roll pin is:

    120 Piece Roll Pin Storehouse


    That's enough stuff for now. Obviously you also need a good selection of screwdrivers,wrenches, pliers, and what not.
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

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    That's a good list, Enzo, and as someone who has been tinkering with stuff for decades, I have most all of those handy items.

    I do, however, advise anyone to avoid Harbor Freight junk. Between myself an my friends, I have seen enough 'handy items' turn into useless garbage from that place.

    The tweezers are cheap, and bend. I would not trust the X-Acto stuff. Friend had one, they won't keep blade tight..dangerous.

    I bought a deep socket set, and one split on first use.

    Bought some picks. Was digging a piece of plastic out of a tight hole, and the end came off.

    Pin punch? I doubt I'd trust that cheap Chinese "steel" to not break or shatter.

    Had a friend with an air compressor that blew off the fitting after a couple months. "FFzzzzfzfzffssshhPOP!!!...ziiingggggg" Lucky nobody was in its path.

    There's a very good reason all their stuff is so cheap. It's because it's "cheap"...and much of it dangerous.

    I avoid that place like the plague. A little extra money for much better quality and a higher safety factor is well worth it.

    Otherwise...good advice on tools list.

    Brad1

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    Watch for their coupons. 20% off and a free something with every purchase. I get my work gloves there. $3.50 a dozen. Throw them away when they get dirty. I have a free tape measure for each room at home, and a bunch of free flash lights and screw drivers. I've bought a few other tools there too. Never had a problem with reliability. I even have one of their $3.00 DMM's (these are free with a coupon) I was a little suspicious of it's performance, so I got a Fluke and every time I've compared them I get the same readings. If you are relying on your tools to earn a living, you'll want better tools, but for home use I think they are just fine.
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    Senior Member Enzo's Avatar
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    I don't buy my good tools there, but it is one place I can find all those things in one stop to talk about here. Ther is nothing they sell that you cannot also find at most hardware stores or auto parts stores. When I am using the pin punches for alignment, they are not at all likely to shatter. And the cheap plastic caliper isn't going to get any stress, it is just a ruler.

    My tweezer set was bought under the GC brand 50 some years ago. GC was a cheap line of tools, probably every TV guy in AMerica had a set of their plastic IF can twiddlers. But they last. I don't put any particular stress on them. My knife set is Xacto brand, but the Sears house brand is fine. It is more a matter of being aware of the sorts of tools out there. Anyone who has struggled to keep a chassis lined up with the mounting holes while supporting its weight in one hand and starting screws with the other might appreciate the pin punch idea.
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

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    Supporting Member The Dude's Avatar
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    I sometimes look at my tools and laugh. I still have most of the tools I bought for tech school decades ago. Of course some were broken or lost, but I'm bettin' I still have near 90% of them.
    “Yeah, well, you know, that’s just, like, your opinion, man.”

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    Senior Member Sowhat's Avatar
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    Interesting thread, most everything I still use is from back in the Johnson administration but I have upgraded things over the years in places. I was doing some inventory the other day and I found I had 5 nibblers. I must have been nibbler crazy at one time, probably when I was fabricating a lot of chassis's where I could not afford Greenlee punches. Probably one of my most used tools is a set of dental picks. I find them invaluable, they have so many uses. I have finally moved into the 21st century and retired my good old Weller 35 watt pencil and replaced it with a Hakko digital adjustable temperature iron, I still use 60/40 solder exclusively but if I encounter some lead free crap, I got the iron to cope with it now, at least I don't have to worry about tin whiskers.
    ... That's $1.00 for the chalk mark and $49,999.00 for knowing where to put it!

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    I haven't bought that much stuff from Harbor Freight, but my boss has. Like the set of T-handle hex keys that lasted maybe a month until they rounded enough not to grab a hex screw anymore. You can only shorten them so many times until they become too difficult to use.

    I only will consider buying tools that I need to use once or twice, as they don't seem to last long enough to make long term heavy shop use practical.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Enzo's Avatar
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    Yeah, I don't trust wrenches, and yes, I'd expect Allens to round off. I am sure I can bend over a small screwdriver prying something, but then that isn't what the tools is made for.

    I did talk my dentist out of some dental picks, they are fine too. The pick I use is an old Owatona o-ring seal pick for doing brakes. I have been using the same one for 40 years, it is sturdy and surprisingly resistance to bending. The one in the link has a metal handle, while mine has the metal core end to end with a plastic handle formed around the center. I like that because it insulates me if I want to pick at something live. The semi-curve end has a tiny notch near the end for catching a spring to push over something. And it is the end I use to get under fuses in clips.

    Super price on OTC Tools 7312 at ToolTopia.com

    I have always had good life from Craftsman hand tools, and Xcelite as well. I am sure there are other good brands. I have many of my fathers tools, and some from my grandfather. I have a small pair of Utica dikes that are older than I am, and they still cut and the joint is not rocking around.

    My plain old Weller 100/140 gun has worked for 50 plus years. I admit to having replaced the plastic outer housing, you can only drop them on cement so many times.

    Another great tool is a small inspection mirror. You might talk your dentist out of one, but here:

    Telescoping Mirror

    But a "locker mirror" is also handy, you can find them at school supply or office supply stores. The link one is glass, I prefer the plastic ones so I can drop them. The magnet on the rear can be stuck to some support, or just flip the thing on its face and store screws on the magnet. great for reaching around behind a chassis to see which jack is which or which control does what.

    http://www.amazon.com/Inch-Magnetic-...VBB02JSQ3ZMDZ6

    My grandfather was a paint salesman, so he visited hardware and paint stores, so he had a few other things. I have a box of brass nested screwdrivers that are probably 75 years old. Over the years they have evaporated into tool heaven, so there are only a few left, but they are darn useful, the tiny inner one is great for eyeglass screws.

    Brass "Nesting" Screwdrivers | Collectors Weekly

    Don't overlook cheap useful tools like these just because I used harbor freight for photos, you can get them other places.

    And smart guys have a wall mirror on the rear wall of the bench. I can lean around and see lit tube heaters or sparks or where the hell my roll of solder went.
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    I'll often buy a cheap tool to get me through a few of a particular job, which can bag me enough $ to be able to get me the quality one. You can do a lot more work with that $30 wrench set than you can with the $300 wrench set that you couldn't afford in the first place... a cheap tool can get me enough work to afford a good one, better than turning away work necause I can.t afford quality tools. Obviously doesn't apply to EVERY tool, but many do.

    Justin
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    Brass nesting screwdrivers! I had a set of those back when I was a kid. Really nice German made, great for almost anything, until the world switched over to Philips heads. I was always fascinated with how they worked.

    Sadly they disappeared a long time ago.

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    Senior Member Sowhat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
    And smart guys have a wall mirror on the rear wall of the bench. I can lean around and see lit tube heaters or sparks or where the hell my roll of solder went.
    Simple and effective. I started using a big mirror behind the bench when I did a lot of monitor work back in the arcade video game era and soon discovered the great utility of this for everything. When I recently relocated I took great care in making sure my big mirror made it to my new shop unbroken. I don't know what I would do without it.
    ... That's $1.00 for the chalk mark and $49,999.00 for knowing where to put it!

  12. #12
    Old Timer Tom Phillips's Avatar
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    My contribution in commented photos.
    Cheers,
    Tom
    canvas-stretcher.jpgchicago-supreme-4100b.jpgsoldering-aid-tool.jpghand-powered-drill.jpgbrass-nesting-screwdriver.jpg
    Last edited by Tom Phillips; 09-05-2015 at 11:42 PM.
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    Old Timer Leo_Gnardo's Avatar
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    In Tom Phillips' photo #3, all hail the mighty Beau-Tech! I got mine from a retired super smart MechE who designed parts of the Lunar Rover.

    Made my own solder aids from a broken radio shaft kit, heck they always break. Filed the scrapers & point to a fine edge, stuck the other ends into wine corks or built up handles from heatshrink scraps. Mini brushes made by soldering cut up 9 or 10 gauge guitar strings into pieces of brass tube from hobby shop, way better than any store-bought plus I re use the handles when the brush finally wears out.

    Canvas stretcher, must get one of those. I do OK on grilles but that thing would come in mighty handy. Thanks for showing us!

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    Senior Member Enzo's Avatar
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    Yeah Tom, I still have a soldering aid I think I got from Heathkit half a century ago. And back then, most of my parts came from old TV chassis and their point to point wiring. Unwinding component leads was a major part of it.

    I used to use one of those hand crank drills as a kid, building stuff. and the related tool, the Yankee Driver:

    Yankee Screwdrivers: Yankee Screwdriver, Push Screwdriver, Pump Action Scre


    I never used a canvas stretcher, but I have covered MANY pool table slates with new felt, and you have to stretch that taut with no wrinkles. I use that skill doing grille cloth.

    Sowhat, I have to admit I got into the habit of mirror on the back wall doing arcade monitors myself. These days I go to Home Depot or similar and buy a few 12" square mirror tiles and mount them.

    You can still get nesting screwdrivers, though I usually see them as part of a hammer:

    The Cutest Tool I Own | Manhattan Nest
    http://www.amazon.com/Silk-Flower-Ha.../dp/B000FX4VFC
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

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    Old Timer Tom Phillips's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
    ...the Yankee Driver...
    Yeah man! The Yankee driver! The one you linked shows that they updated it to use modern hex shaft bits. Makes sense. That Chicago Supreme driver attachment I posted uses the same type of bits that the original Yankee screwdriver used. The ones with a flat machined into the base of the round shaft. I could snap off the shafts of #12 wood screws with that thing if I tried to tighten them too much in hardwood. (I often got myself into trouble with the mindset of "tighter is better."
    Tom

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    Senior Member Enzo's Avatar
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    Oh yeah. I had an original with those round bits. I had the screwdriver bits, but also a couple drill bits. The little drills for all the world looked like double sided half round chisels.

    I used to watch Norm on This Old House or New Yankee Workshop, and they occasionally whipped out this Yankee driver that must have been two feet long - HUGE. But they could give it one push and drive the entire screw into the work. Seems to me they used it in places like basement work screwing things to floor joists above. But pretty cool, just one big shove.

    I think I told Tom about this over lunch, but aside from the Yankee and the eggbeater drills, I used my grandfathers auger brace and bits for drilling.

    Brace:
    Stanley - 5044 Bit Brace 250 Mm 10In - Screwdriver Bits - Amazon.com

    I had a 3/8" bit for pots and jacks, but for toggle switches, I needed larger, so I had a countersink bit I usedto enlarge the holes some:
    Vintage Hand Brace Countersink Auger Bit Stock Photo, Picture And Royalty Free Image. Pic 5441086.

    When I had to make a 1" or larger chassis hole for a tube socket, I had to first drill a circle of small holes, like 1/8", then snip out the central scrap inside my perforation. Then I used a burring ream to grind out to a smooth hole
    Burring ream for auger brace:
    General No 134 Burring Reamer | eBay

    In relatively light aluminum chassis, I could enlarge a 12AX7 size hole to octal with the ream.

    Note the drills and other bits for the auger brace had this square tapered base that fits nothing else. The brace had a ratchet function so you could drill in places you had no room for all the way around cranking.

    Then one magic Xmas, my folks got me a Black and Decker 3/8" power drill...
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

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    Whilst I'm pretty much in favour of buying branded, quality tools, sometimes the cheap stuff can work out just fine. It just depends what it is, how often you use it and what it's used for.

    Years ago, Japanese tools had a poor reputation, but they moved up in quality. The same with Taiwan. I have some really good tools from those countries that stand up to any western equivalent. Chinese stuff has a well-deserved bad reputation. Dental picks that bend like candy, twist drills that twist and don't drill, poor materials, poor tolerance, poor finish, poor heat treatment. But every now and then you drop on something that's ok, or even good.

    I have some scribers that hold a keen point just as well as my Moore & Wright set. Not as nicely finished, but a tenth of the price.

    The cheap digital vernier caliper is as accurate as my W.German Mauser caliper. I use it every day.

    My stereoscopic PCB inspection microscope is superb and a delight to own and use.

    One of my favourite Chinese tools has a combination side cutter one end and an automatic wire stripper the other. Maybe it's a cheap copy of some US tool, but I can't really fault it for the price. When wiring up stomp-boxes it's really efficient and is my go-to tool. I use it constantly and it never dulls or lets me down.

    I have a Chinese pneumatic nailer that cost me £9 that is incredibly good. Maybe if I used it every day in factory conditions it wouldn't hold up, but I only need it a dozen or so times a year and it's just fine. Horses for Courses.

  18. #18
    Supporting Member eschertron's Avatar
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    Here's the one tool I have from Harbor freight that I find indispensable:
    Micro Flush Cutter

    It's cheap, but made in India so it has lasted longer than I expected; it cuts - very cleanly - the shield braid on umpteen cables I've had to prep at work. After a year it's a little loose at the joint but still sharp. Contrast that to the Kobalt branded diag cutter I got from lowes that didn't work from the first day I had it
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Conner View Post
    If it still won't get loud enough, it's probably broken.

  19. #19
    Supporting Member Steve A.'s Avatar
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    That's a good list, Enzo, and as someone who has been tinkering with stuff for decades, I have most all of those handy items.
    I do, however, advise anyone to avoid Harbor Freight junk. Between myself an my friends, I have seen enough 'handy items' turn into useless garbage from that place...

    I worked 30 years as a service tech (appliance, electrical and plumbing before specializing in HVAC) and most of my tools were Craftsmen or other reputable brands. When Harbor Freight eventually opened a store locally most of what they sold were as you said: garbage... cheap Chinese crap.


    But over the years the factories in China have gotten much better and most of the newer designed hand tools at HF are pretty good... within their limits, of course. It is not cost-effective for the factories to make particularly crappy tools especially for Harbor Freight. (Now they still do make some of the older crappy designs which have not been improved, like their old tap and die sets... ugh!)


    Their AC and battery-driven tools are pretty good for the price. I have a $60 heat gun that I bought from Sears 30 years ago and the $15 one from HF works just as well. Their cordless drills under $20 are decent enough but nothing to write home about (the jaws do not hold the 1/16" bits very securely)


    Their 5 piece pick & hook set for $3.49 works pretty good and I can't imagine anyone breaking it with routine soldering tasks.





    5 Piece Test Probe Set


    People who complain about the quality of Harbor Freight tools might not have been in the stores for 10+ years and aren't familiar with some of their newer tools. And they do have a money-back guarantee on their tools so be sure to save your receipt.


    Steve Ahola


    P.S. This is just a hunch but in the bad old days I think HF would submit their own designs to the factories in China while today they usually order hand tools already designed by the factory and in production cafeteria-style with their only design function being the HF packaging.

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    Senior Member jbltwin1's Avatar
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    You guys left out the most important one--A BFH. I'll let you fill in the rest! Mike.

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    ToneOholic! big_teee's Avatar
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    I used my BFH yesterday, and it is the 4 lb. shop variety!
    Watch the fingers!
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    Technicians Run the World, but Bankers, Lawyers, and Accountants, Take All The Credit!
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    Old Timer Leo_Gnardo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbltwin1 View Post
    You guys left out the most important one--A BFH. I'll let you fill in the rest! Mike.
    You bet! I got my 1 lb rubber BFH for a buck, it's saved me sore fists thousands of times when pounding on gear to locate intermittent connections. I call it "Maxwell's Rubber Hammer."

    Rarely have to use the 3 lb and 8 lb sledges, on gear anyway.

    There's always the handy carpenter's claw hammer. It's orange of course, to commemorate Cap'n Beefheart's song.

    Surprisingly the mini 4 oz "child's" carp claw hammer comes into use frequently, driving in small nails & brads or just the perfect "love tap" to bend or straighten some errant piece of metal.

    Hammer on friends!

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    In our shop there is a 15 lb. sledge under the bench. Whenever I seem to spend too much time on something, the boss will come over and pull it out and place it on the bench next to whatever it is that I'm having a problem with.

    I can't think of any reason we have a 15 lb. sledge in the shop, other than for that joke.
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  24. #24
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    They make a good doorstop.
    Certified Dotard

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    Supporting Member The Dude's Avatar
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    ...and they're useful for that occasional unruly customer.
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    “Yeah, well, you know, that’s just, like, your opinion, man.”

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    Senior Member Enzo's Avatar
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    Hammers. Every now and then some wag walks into the shop and suggests "You probably need a bigger hammer." they don't realize, that hammers, like pliers come in all sizes, and I have them all. Well no, I do not have a good framing hammer. But I know some house builders who do.

    I have the large rubber mallet, and a small one, plus my soft face hammer, rubber on one side and plastic on the other. Got my basic claw hammer, and yes, a tiny claw hammer. Got my ball peen hammer. I grew up with it spelled ball pein, but I guess now peen is accepted too. In one shop we called the 3 pound maul the adjuster, and the 8 pounder the convincer. Got a dead blow hammer somewhere, haven't had a use for it in years.


    I am OK with HF stuff. yes there is junk, but there are some OK tools too. I bought their battery drill, 15v? 18v? I forget now. Cost $15, has worked just fine for around the house now for several years. I have a "better" one in the shop too.

    Yeah, I am not too concerned my explorer picks and stuff are going to break at a critical moment. I haven't stressed them, but the screwdrivers in the kit have worked well enough. My little plastic calipers cost maybe $3, and they measure. What else would I expect them to do? It is a plastic ruler with a slide. Everyone should have one. Is that a 16mm pot? A 12mm or 14mm square one? It tells me in seconds.

    I use pin punches a lot, but almost exclusively as alignment pins (aka drift pins), so I am not concerned they will shatter when hammered.

    And those little LED flashlights they give away or sell in pairs for cheap, god I love those. You can find the same thing in "real" stores for $15. All I do is make sure they work when I buy them. I always have at least one in my pockets.
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

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    A good pair of jeans. Cause shorts just dont do when soldering.

    nosaj
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    Old Timer Leo_Gnardo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
    And those little LED flashlights they give away or sell in pairs for cheap, god I love those. You can find the same thing in "real" stores for $15. All I do is make sure they work when I buy them. I always have at least one in my pockets.
    I'm way behind the times as usual, just picked up a $20 2-pak of Maglite LED flashlights this week at Home Despot. WOW they're some kinda bright! The 2xAA will take the place of my bench Mag that finally went legs up last week after 30 years on the job, and 2xAAA will take the place of the old dim single-C lamp I kept for navigating the dark in case of power outages. That 2xAA makes my eyes hurt OTOH I can peer in every nook & cranny of a chassis, sweep circuit boards quickly to sight broken/bad solder. Up 'til now I'd only seen the cheap dim bluish "white" LED flashlights, these are something else. "Welding" bright, almost.
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  29. #29
    Senior Member Enzo's Avatar
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    These things:
    3-1/2 in. 9 LED Mini Flashlight

    HF has them on "sale" for $2, but they are also on the coupon rotation as a free item several times a year.
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  30. #30
    Supporting Member The Dude's Avatar
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    The C-store a couple blocks from my house has them for 3 bucks all year long. I have 'em everywhere. You lose one, batteries go dead, need an extra one for the garage, etc., just grab another.
    “Yeah, well, you know, that’s just, like, your opinion, man.”

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    I like the look of the HF powder coat setup. Super-cheap and along with a toaster-oven would make a good setup for stompboxes and small parts.Sadly, not available in the UK. At least, not at that price.

    Powder Coating Gun with 10-30 PSI Powder Coating System

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    I've had a couple die unexpectedly, the $20 Maglite is worth it. I'm sure there's something cheaper but sudden flashlight death is not good. I actually prefer the incandescent ones camping, I just want enough light to see but not lose night vision.

  33. #33
    Supporting Member Steve A.'s Avatar
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    14 or 15 piece Craftsmen SAE/metric set of nutdrivers

    One of the most useful tools I have is the 14 or 15 piece Craftsmen SAE/metric set of nutdrivers. Although the two standards are often interchangeable the metric drivers have a wider hollow opening in shaft to accommodate pot shafts, etc. (8mm, 10mm & 1/2" are the drivers I seem to use the most.)



    Craftsman.com

    Steve Ahola

    P.S. I have the set with the zippered case which I consider to be indispensable. I also have a larger metric driver - 12 or 13mm - that I use a lot.
    Last edited by Steve A.; 07-17-2016 at 07:07 AM.

  34. #34
    Supporting Member Steve A.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
    These things:
    3-1/2 in. 9 LED Mini Flashlight

    HF has them on "sale" for $2, but they are also on the coupon rotation as a free item several times a year.
    I've had at least a dozen of them, all free, and several have stopped working. I really like their $3.99 27 LED magnetic work lights that used to be a coupon freebie quite often a year or two ago.



    http://www.harborfreight.com/27-led-...ght-62532.html

    For LED flashlights my favorites are among the ones that Fry's sells for a few bucks with their daily promo codes. They offer free shipping for orders over $34 in the lower 48 states which is great if you don't have a local store. They mail you an email every day with a link to their promo ad which often has some incredible clearance specials (75%+ off). Most of the time you will find many prices lower than anywhere else on the internet (assuming you don't pay shipping.)

    http://www.frys.com/workflow/AcctMai...mocom/subc.jsp

    Steve Ahola
    Last edited by Steve A.; 04-14-2016 at 03:25 PM.

  35. #35
    Supporting Member Steve A.'s Avatar
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    Me and my memory... I'm looking all over for a magnifying glass to inspect an FX pedal pcb more closely and then remember that I have an OptiVisor with an OptiLOUPE and a Quasar Lighting System Model 6010, with my choice of an L2 or L4 lens.

    Here are links for a real OptiVisor with 4 lensplates for $56 and a Chinese knockoff for $25. (The knockoff looks more comfortable because it has a cushion on the headband. I don't know if it will accommodate the OptiLOUPE or Quasar Lighting System.)



    https://jet.com/product/detail/d68ae...ca27ea6ab1bf8d

    %=%=%=%=%=%=%



    http://www.ebay.com/itm/4-Lens-Head-...-/201264049232

    It looks like the Chinese knockoff uses plastic rivets to secure the lensplate. A local hardware store might have small nuts and bolts which would make changing the lensplate much easier.

    Steve Ahola

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