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Thread: What's For Supper?

  1. #1016
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
    Bone in a pot of beans
    Bone in split pea soup
    Ham in scalloped potatoes
    Ham in mac n cheese
    ANywhere salt pork might have gone
    Ham sushi - I have seen it in person, but lacked the balls to try it. I'll stick to eel and tuna.

    My mom used to sizzle up ham slices in a skillet, and added a glaze made with brown sugar and dry mustard and not sure what else.
    Ham and scalloped potatoes is a bit hit with the wife and I......

  2. #1017
    Supporting Member Chuck H's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
    Bone in a pot of beans
    Bone in split pea soup
    Ham in scalloped potatoes
    Ham in mac n cheese
    This is starting to sound like the Monte Python "SPAM" bit.

    My favorite part of which is "SPAM, SPAM, SPAM and SPAM."
    "The man is an incompetent waste of human flesh. He should donate his organs now to someone who might actually make good use of them." The Dude re: maybe I shouldn't say, but his name rhymes with Trump

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  3. #1018
    Senior Member Enzo's Avatar
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    SPAM is popular in Hawaii, and I forget the name, but they make a sort of sushi with it. A block of rice with a slab of SPAM. A little diner opened here a few years back that served the dish. I liked it. The place was starch city though. You got the fried SPAM on rice, and the side dishes were macaroni salad and potato salad.
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  4. #1019
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    Ham and eggs, Ham and eggs,
    I like mine fried nice and brown.
    I like mine fried up side down.

    Ham and eggs, Ham and eggs,
    Flip 'em, Flop 'em, Flop 'em, Flip 'em,
    Ham and eggs!
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  5. #1020
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    Quote Originally Posted by g1 View Post
    Ham and eggs, Ham and eggs,
    I like mine fried nice and brown.
    I like mine fried up side down.

    Ham and eggs, Ham and eggs,
    Flip 'em, Flop 'em, Flop 'em, Flip 'em,
    Ham and eggs!
    FUNEM?

    S, VFM!

    FUNEX?

    S, VFX!

    OK! NVFMNX!

    From one of the Zap comix or similar.

  6. #1021
    Supporting Member Steve A.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve A. View Post
    I've been getting good results cooking steaks for 6 to 8 minutes on my George Foreman-style grill (a Hamilton Beach #25359) and then putting them in the microwave on a plate covered by a Pyrex bowl, typically for 30-60 seconds with it sitting for 2-3 minutes before flipping the steak over to cook it an additional 15-45 seconds covered by a bowl with it sitting for 90-120 seconds. I will typically sprinkle some Worchestershire sauce on each side before nuking it.

    One complication is that the Pyrex bowl gets very hot and with no handle it is tricky to remove without burning fingers. So I just ordered a glass cover from Amazon with a stay-cool black silicone handle on the top. (There is no vent but you can prop up the cover a bit to allow steam to escape when desired.)




    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00JLTE4YO/
    The microwave cover arrived last Friday and it has been working very well for me. I got an 11" diameter plate from Goodwill which is a better fit than my 10" dinner plates. Besides finishing up steaks I've been using it for frozen fish filets and chicken. IMO using the cover along with lower power levels adds whole new dimensions to microwave cooking.

    I have noticed that for the less tender cuts of beef it works best if I marinade them for at least 24 hours (I've been adding pineapple juice to Kikkoman Teriyaki Marinade and Sauce.) I'll often cut a larger steak into 2 or 3 pieces so I might cook one piece after an overnight marinade and another after a 24+ hour marinade for a fairly accurate test.

    Quote Originally Posted by rjb View Post
    But why do you nuke the steaks after grilling them? Are they still raw in the middle? Do you preheat the grill before putting on the steaks?
    When I could still use my electric range*** I was starting to use a trick I learned on-line from one of the top steak houses. Ever wonder how the steaks in restaurants usually come out pretty good whether they are cooked rare, medium or well-done? Cooked under my broiler at home by the time they were well-done inside they were usually burnt to a crisp on the top.

    What some steak houses do is sear the meat on a hot grill for a certain length of time and then move it to a hot oven to finish cooking it, shorter times for rare, longer times for well-done. So you get the perfect looking grill marks and the steak cooked to the desired doneness.

    "So that's how they do it!"

    Getting back to your questions, yes I do preheat the grill. I found that if I preheat it longer than the recommended 5-6 minutes the grids will cool off considerably before the contact temperature switch cycles the element back on.

    I love finding the thin cut rib eyes on sale and with 30 or 50% off Mgr Sale stickers since they can be cooked medium well in 5 or 6 minutes. Any longer than that on most of the cheaper GF-style grills***** will burn the outsides of the steak and dry out the insides.

    For regular thickness steaks finishing them up in the microwave under the glass dome works for me. I'll set my 1000 watt MW to 50% power so it cycles on about half the time and set it for 60 to 120 seconds (after sprinkling on some Worchestershire sauce.)

    With the dome the steak is basically steamed in the microwave which would normally be a disaster but 5 or 6 minutes on the GF-style grill kinda dries the steak out a bit so its a wash. And there is a nice bonus on the plate: half meat juice and half W. sauce is perfect for dipping!

    Although this all sounds very unorthodox the results are great... I prefer these steaks to what I'd usually get at a restaurant and I try to keep the cost of dinner to around $3 or $4 tops.

    Steve A.

    *** I am in the middle of a total house decluttering which I started about 15 months ago, right before I was diagnosed with cancer. So I have crap piled up on top and in front of my electric stove, thus putting it out of commission temporarily. For small meals I like using my microwave and countertop toaster broiler convection oven but I do miss being able to cook roasts, etc.

    ***** I have a larger GF grill that has a variable temperature control which allows you to cook thicker steaks longer without burning them. But it doesn't fit on my counters although it does fit perfectly on my stove once I remove all of the crap on top of it...
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  7. #1022
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    The only time I really use a microwave is to nuke a quick hot dog.....or to take something like a frozen waffle for a few seconds to help thaw it out before putting it in the toaster.....when it comes to steaks, I always BBQ.......and I like to have a few beer while I am at it...I am hoping that in a couple of years I am going to put a BBQ pit in the back yard......line it with fire brick and rig up a metal tray to hold the coals and put a grate over the top......and BBQ with that...can't beat the taste of coals or even better......nice clean hardwood....and it sure beats propane...but...propane is clean, and fast...and that's the problem..too fast...not enough time to have a few beer.....
    Cheers

  8. #1023
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    Tonight, Pot Pies, salad, hot rolls, and some leftover veggies.
    Hit the spot.
    T
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    Had some leftover steamed potatoes and a half pound of bacon from a 1lb pack that I wanted to use. So...

    Potato pancakes Fried the bacon in the oven (I always do). Mashed the potatoes coarsely. Added some chives, grated cheddar, the bacon (crumbled), an egg, a little Krusteaz pancake mix and enough water to loosen it some. Still had to mash it down in the pan a little. Fried in a cast iron skillet with butter. Worked out pretty well. Served with sour cream and a little more chives on top as garnish.
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  10. #1025
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    Cooking steaks in the microwave...?

    Here is the thread I ran across in January 2014 that presented the idea of using a microwave in conjunction with a George Foreman grill for cooking steaks...

    I cook my steaks with the microwave

    Apparently microwaves have a stigma attached to it in fine cooking and some even see using it for cooking steaks is a sin.
    • Conventional cooking heats by conduction and the outside will always cook more than inside, but microwave energy can provide heating beneath the surface.
    • Although some say microwaves cook from "inside out", this isn't quite correct. The penetration depth is something around 1.7cm (for residential 2.45GHz model, about 2-3 times deeper for 0.92 GHz industrial microwaves) and the microwave energy is reduced as you increase in depth. Shallower depth heats up more,however microwave heating below the surface as well.
    • The idea is that microwave can cook the meat with lesser variation in doneness through the full depth. You can further reduce the temperature gradient by cooking at reduced duty cycle (the power setting does not actually reduce the power, but changes the amount of pause in between heating)
    • I'll either pre-heat the meat in the microwave then finish on the Geroge Foreman grill, or I'll sear both sides on the GF grill first to seal the meat, then finish cooking the meat to desired doneness in the microwave. The surface finish is important in making the meat presentable, so microwave alone won't do it, however used in conjunction with G.F. grill, the outcome is completely fine for me. While microwaving I put the meat on the plate, then put the plate on an inverted bowl, so that microwave energy can access the bottom as well.
    • What I get is meat that is adequately cooked in the center yet tender all the way to the surface.
    • Using similar thickness and weight cuts, you can get the cooking time to exact science and get a very consistent result every time.
    • Any other advocates for microwave assisted steak cooking?
    I cook my steaks with the microwave

    Steve A.

  11. #1026
    Supporting Member Steve A.'s Avatar
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    Chuck eye steaks

    A friend was telling me about chuck eye steaks sometimes available at one of the local grocery stores. I figured it was just marketing hype but finally got around to googling it last night. Funny thing is that I have never seen them at the stores I go to but they had one today not only on the weekly sale but with a Manager's Special 30% off sticker... must be my lucky day!

    What is a chuck eye steak? It is often referred to as the poor man’s rib eye and that is for good reason. Rib eyes are cut from the 6th to the 12th rib of the cow. The chuck eye is cut off the 5th rib. Don’t confuse them with chuck steaks. These are chuck EYE steaks. There are only two chuck eye steaks per cow so they aren’t always available. But when they are, they are quite the treat at a much discounted rate from the lauded rib eye.
    https://grillinfools.com/blog/2013/0...uck-eye-steak/

    Steve A.

  12. #1027
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve A. View Post
    A friend was telling me about chuck eye steaks sometimes available at one of the local grocery stores. I figured it was just marketing hype but finally got around to googling it last night. Funny thing is that I have never seen them at the stores I go to but they had one today not only on the weekly sale but with a Manager's Special 30% off sticker... must be my lucky day!



    https://grillinfools.com/blog/2013/0...uck-eye-steak/

    Steve A.
    I've been seeing chuck eye in my local market, but haven't tried them. I do have some in the freezer that my wife bought. The "chuck" part made me think they were tough. I've been getting flat iron and Denver steaks. They are very affordable, pretty tender (maybe like a sirloin, but much better flavour) and a good size for a pan. I am looking forward to trying those chuck eyes now.

  13. #1028
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmartn149 View Post
    I've been seeing chuck eye in my local market, but haven't tried them. I do have some in the freezer that my wife bought. The "chuck" part made me think they were tough. I've been getting flat iron and Denver steaks. They are very affordable, pretty tender (maybe like a sirloin, but much better flavour) and a good size for a pan. I am looking forward to trying those chuck eyes now.
    I haven't seen any chuck eye steaks here where I am...mostly what we have in our local super dupers are sirloin, strip loin, inside round, filet and the good old T-bone.....

  14. #1029
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    Brine a 20+ pound turkey - set up a weber BBQ with a drip pan and coals on either side of the pan - cook for 3 hours. Gravy comes from the drip pan contents - best roasted/smokey turkey and gravy ever.
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  15. #1030
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    I've heard several reports of "best turkey ever" when done on a Weber BBQ (the flying saucer, not the gas grill). Still need to try it!

    Related... Ran out of turkey stock from TG turkey leftovers. Enjoyed it so much the wife and I bought ANOTHER turkey last week. Roasted and breast meat saved for lunch meat. The rest is going in a pot to make more stock The stock is about the only thing about a turkey I like better than a chicken. I'd rather eat a chicken than a turkey any day, but stock made from roasted turkey is like culinary magic.
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  16. #1031
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    Went diving at the coast this Oct (abalone and yellow fin tuna - yum) and to add turf to the surf... I made ground turkey and duck sliders. Just add to the ground T&D: red onion, parsley, garlic, mushrooms and cook on the BBQ top with a good sharp cheddar - no complaints.
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  17. #1032
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    Usually I eat a few sandwiches for a supper.
    To want to, is to be able to, if not there is rehab

  18. #1033
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    How about breakfast?
    When I was a kid, Mom would serve us rice fixed up like oatmeal; butter, milk, and sugar, a little cinnamon. I hadn't had it like that for maybe 1/2 a century. I made some today with left over rice, and it was okay.
    Does anyone else eat rice like that? My folks were from Oklahoma. Is it a regional thing?

  19. #1034
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    How different is that from the rice pudding dessert?
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmartn149 View Post
    How about breakfast?
    When I was a kid, Mom would serve us rice fixed up like oatmeal; butter, milk, and sugar, a little cinnamon. I hadn't had it like that for maybe 1/2 a century. I made some today with left over rice, and it was okay.
    Does anyone else eat rice like that? My folks were from Oklahoma. Is it a regional thing?
    We used to do that growing up in Southern California. I don't think it was regional, for us it was just more of a lack of money thing
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  21. #1036
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    Quote Originally Posted by g1 View Post
    How different is that from the rice pudding dessert?
    Well, no egg, no raisins, but probably tastes similar.

  22. #1037
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    Then I'm surprised it isn't much more popular. I don't care for oatmeal but I'd eat that instead.
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmartn149 View Post
    Does anyone else eat rice like that? My folks were from Oklahoma. Is it a regional thing?
    My mom made rice in a skillet pan, that's how I learned. (I use a small corning glass pot now.) Leftover rice wedges were fried for breakfast with butter & pancake syrup, a rare treat.

    Growing up in New Jersey, I was probably one of the rare less than 1% who learned to make and enjoy grits.

    We had a breakfast campaign in first grade, all sorts of choices to check off on the "what did you have?" menu. Grits was not on the list, one more way I caused consternation to my 1st grade teacher.
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  24. #1039
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leo_Gnardo View Post
    My mom made rice in a skillet pan, that's how I learned. (I use a small corning glass pot now.) Leftover rice wedges were fried for breakfast with butter & pancake syrup, a rare treat.

    Growing up in New Jersey, I was probably one of the rare less than 1% who learned to make and enjoy grits.

    We had a breakfast campaign in first grade, all sorts of choices to check off on the "what did you have?" menu. Grits was not on the list, one more way I caused consternation to my 1st grade teacher.

    like this?
    Leftover-Rice Cakes ? 30 Pounds of Apples

    I don't eat grits. Not that they are awful, just bland and unappetizing.

  25. #1040
    Senior Member Enzo's Avatar
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    I like grits.

    I think breakfast rice is all over, but not all that popular, if that makes sense. I mean I don't think it is regional, but widespread, but a low percentage have it a lot. I like my rice savory, but whenever I make it, I make a large pot so I will have extra left over. I will heat it up with some sort of tomato sauce or I also have these jars of asian stuff to sprinkle on it. But my wife heats up left over rice with honey.

    Back in the 1960s I was a...uh... guest of the county for 90 days. (Something about I possessed certain pharmaceuticals they felt I shouldn;t have) And my job while in the slammer was in the kitchen. We fed about 150 people each meal. Anyway, we served rice for breakfast two days a week. Rice and cinnamon and sugar one day and rice and raisins the other. it was hot and tasty, and we got no complaints from the... other guests. The rest of the week we had oatmeal one day, and cold cereal with milk the rest.

    My mom occasionally did make rice for breakfast. Top with butter and brown sugar. I like it but never make it for myself.

    I like furikake, comes in a variety of flavors. A flaked/powdered stuff you shake over hot rice.
    furikake00.png

    81wzxix8orl._sy550_.jpg

    I see Amazon sells it, but it is much cheaper at my local Asian market.
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    I guess I thought it was regional because my wife had never heard of it. Maybe it's just that if your family had it you know about it, if not, then not. Like you said Enzo widespread but not that popular.

  27. #1042
    Senior Member Enzo's Avatar
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    I could be wrong, but my general impression over my life experience is that rice is more a johnny come lately for most Americans. Potatoes are the default starch for most, I think. We had potatoes with just everything. South of the Mason-Dixon line people have hundreds of ways to make potatoes. Up in places like Michigan that is reduced to four or five maybe, but still... Then there is pasta: spaghetti, lasagna, macaroni and cheese. We liked rice fine, but had it less often than the others. It came with Chinese takeout. When mom made plain old rice for dinner, we ate it like mashed potatoes. I remember whenever she made fried liver and onions - a fave of mine - she always made a great thick brown gravy from the pan. Dump that over rice just like potatoes.

    Look at restaurants, other than Asian ones, how prominent is rice on most menus?

    I make rice quite often myself. Under stir fry or in fried rice. But also in potato like ways. In fact I am about to go make dinner, a couple pork chops, and have not yet decided if it will have rice or potatoes next to them. Frozen peas. Pan gravy.
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  28. #1043
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
    Look at restaurants, other than Asian ones, how prominent is rice on most menus?
    Very true indeed. Most restaurants to see rice always are Indian and Middle Eastern food places. I love me some Basmati rice or wild grains. The traditional bland white sticky rice you find at Chinese restaurants is such a bore by itself. However, every now and again I have made some great fresh jasmine rice too. Another place you find a lot of rice is in Cajun recipes, yum. My dogs certainly love when we feed them some chicken and rice, never potatoes for the muts. Well except on thanksgiving.
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  29. #1044
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmartn149 View Post
    How about breakfast?
    When I was a kid, Mom would serve us rice fixed up like oatmeal; butter, milk, and sugar, a little cinnamon.
    I've made something like that- sort of a lazy, Americanized version of mangoes & sticky rice.

    But how about serving oatmeal fixed up like rice? I once accidently dumped chili powder instead of cinnamon in my oatmeal (same size & color container, no glasses). No problem. Just add finely chopped onion, canned black beans, some salsa or stewed tomatoes with chili peppers; nuke a while.... breakfast chili. Yum.

    My mom used to make farina and kale as a side dish- said it was a typical meal during the Depression. Make a big batch, store the leftovers in square plastic containers in the freezer. Take one out, defrost, slice and fry like scrapple. Top with grated cheese or serve with eggs over easy. Double yum.

  30. #1045
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrGonz78 View Post
    Another place you find a lot of rice is in Cajun recipes, yum.
    Ayeee!

  31. #1046
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    Rice for breakfast is not popular here. Except maybe rice crispy's.
    In restaurants here, rice is mostly chinese, or mexican plates, served with rice and beans.
    At home, we do rice under meat and gravy or swiss steak over rice.
    Rice can also be a substitute for noodles or Spaghetti, or vice versa.
    Like chilli over rice, or over noodles or spaghetti.
    This is making me hungry!
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  32. #1047
    Senior Member Enzo's Avatar
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    I recall my mom making dinner when I was tiny, like 1951. We ate trash foods like kale then. Lots of vinegar along with it to cut through the bitterness. Bacon then was cheap meat. My mom made "spanish rice". It was pretty simple. fry up and crumble some bacon. Saute some minced onion in the grease. Steam some rice. Add the bacon and onions to the rice with a small can of tomato paste, et voila, Spanish rice. it was a favorite.
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    I used to get served rice and milk for breakfast when I was young, and would put sugar or maple syrup on it. It was my dad who suggested it, so I don't know if it was a different sort of regional thing, or simply his quirk (his, um, sense of cuisine was a little off).

  34. #1049
    Senior Member Enzo's Avatar
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    My dad had one, a snack or a light meal. He'd take a slice or two of bread, plain old sandwich bread, and pour syrup over it. Eat it like a pancake. I liked it too, but rarely ate it.

    But another of his I still do, gravy on bread. I do love my gravy. If mom made gravy for dinner, and ther was any left, dad would put a slice or two of bread in his plate and pour gravy on them. I still do this. In fact when I cook, I often wind up with a "gravy skillet", meaning a skillet with good rendered fat, brown bits, and maybe some bits of onion or whatnot. Add some flour, then milk and there's gravy. I am always telling my wife "Don't wash that skillet, it's a gravy skillet. A couple hours after dinner, I can heat up that pan, add the flour and milk, and pour the resulting gravy over bread slices. Yum.

    SO when I go to the diner, a hot beef sandwich or hot hamburger sandwich is a fave, the bread and gravy being the best part. For the rest of the world, a hot beef sandwich is hot roast beef on bread, open faced(or stacked), next to mashed potatoes with gravy over all. Hot hamburger is same deal, a hamburger pattey on bread with gravy all over.
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    Meat balls with Rice for supper tonight....I don't eat rice much...every now and then.....hot roast beef sandwitches, or turkey, or hamburger, smothered in thick gravy......can't beat it....and it will soon be time to have either cod fish or salmon stuffed with dressing and baked in the oven.....that tastes very good.....then there is the classic...Salt fish with potatoes.....excellent.....
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