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Thread: What's For Supper?

  1. #1
    ToneOholic! big_teee's Avatar
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    What's For Supper?

    I started to put this in the Thanksgiving thread, because we had been talking about Food.
    My Bride, fixed this for supper, and I thought it looked good, so I snapped a couple of pictures.
    Country fried, or Chicken Fried Steak, Mashed Tators and Gravy, Spinach, & Black eyed peas.
    It was Delicious!
    I also included the chili 3-way pictures, I put on the Thanksgiving thread.
    What did you eat for Supper, or Dinner?
    Post it here.
    T
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails p1010150.jpg   p1010151.jpg   p1010148.jpg   p1010149.jpg  
    Last edited by big_teee; 01-12-2016 at 11:31 PM.
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    Senior Member Enzo's Avatar
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    I am not big on post food pictures, but the wife and I like this little old family restaurant in a nearby small town. They have a monthly calendar of daily specials we consult. Our favorite over there is the chicken fried steak. It is the special one day a month. In fact today was that day for January. So we drove over there earlier and had the chicken fried steak with mashed potatoes and white mushroom gravy. YUM. They bake their own breads there (and great pies too), and they make a good salt rising bread, which is hard to find. So I always have toasted salt rising bread as my bread choice. The tiny place also has a soup and salad bar. Regular salad stuff plus things like guacamole or pickled cabbage. And the soup bar always has at least five soups to as many as seven. All home made, and pretty good. Regulars are good chicken noodle, classic bean soup, the stupid broccoli/cheese soup that is everywhere, a great creamy potato soup, and chili. SOme days they have French onion, or maybe spaghetti soup, really. And others. SO I have a lovely soup while my meal is cooking.

    So crazy you would pick today to mention CFS. It don't get more comfort food than that. Well I guess meatloaf and mashed potatoes edges it out by a hair, at least for me.


    I like what I call gravy restaurants - pretty much the same thing as "diner". They are the places that will serve gravy on stuff. meatloaf and mash, hot beef sandwich, etc. Olive Garden or Outback my be nice places, but they are not gravy places. No matter how good an Italian place is, or a seafood place, it won't be a gravy restaurant. "Salmon? Good choice. What kind of gravy would you like with that?" See, that doesn;t work. I like O-rings and a burger at A&W, and of course a frosty mug or rootbeer, but it isn't a gravy restaurant. Gravy restaurants often have the rotating pie cooler. That is a huge plus, even if I pass on the pie. it tells me it is my kind of place. And of course I expect a lifer waitress who call me "Hon". Even if I decide to have the goulash one day, it is still comforting to know there is a big tub of gravy waiting in the kitchen, just in case...


    So enjoy your CFS dinner. We CFS brothers have to stick together.

    I wonder if CFS has anything to do with my CHF?
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    Old Timer Leo_Gnardo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
    I wonder if CFS has anything to do with my CHF?
    Just as you don't develop CRS.

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    Supporting Member John_H's Avatar
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    We had pork chops. You'll have to wait 'til tomorrow for a picture.
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    rjb
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    Since this place is becoming the food network....

    Who else made a big batch of Hoppin' John and collard greens for New Years?
    It's an old Southern tradition to bring luck and prosperity throughout the year.
    Black-eyed peas represent coins, and greens represent folding money.
    Ham hocks represent smoked pig meat.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hoppin%27_John

    Living south of the Mason-Dixon line, I can claim "Southern" citizenship- even though I grew up in New Jersey.
    One of my favorite Southern traditions is... smoked pig meat.

    And don't forget the cornbread.
    I sometimes put corn kernels in mine. Sometimes chopped onion and jalapeno peppers.
    But never sugar. I hate sweet cornbread. It's supposed to be bread, not cake.


    Bye, Y'all,
    -rb
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    g1
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
    What kind of gravy would you like with that?"

    Choice of gravy? Now that's my kind of restaurant .
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    rjb
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    Quote Originally Posted by g1 View Post
    Choice of gravy? Now that's my kind of restaurant .
    Which flavor- brown or yellow?
    Last edited by rjb; 01-14-2016 at 02:00 AM. Reason: FLAVOR

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    Senior Member Enzo's Avatar
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    usually they have brown gravy and chicken gravy, and of course white gravy.

    Love cornbread, and hushpuppies. I usually make skillet cornbread instead of heating the oven. I start to make hushpuppies, but I make the batter a bit loose, so they turn out like little corn pancakes.

    Yes, of course mince some onion and hot pepper in cornbread batter. Corn kernels is good too. Hell you could even add some cheese.

    My next goal is to replicate those cheese biscuits from Red Lobster. I could go in there and just eat a dozen of those and be happy.

    I think I will make a pot of my famous chili tonight for dinner.


    yesterday was leftover vermicelli noodles with an ad lib sauce of burger/onions/jalapenos in a creamy, cheesy sauce using up leftover cheese sauce base I had with additions, and a pile of green peas stirred in.
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    Supporting Member The Dude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
    ......My next goal is to replicate those cheese biscuits from Red Lobster. I could go in there and just eat a dozen of those and be happy......
    +10
    I love those things!
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    ToneOholic! big_teee's Avatar
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    I had mexican tonight, cooked, & served by mexicans.
    No Pics.
    It was great!
    Buritto, Enchilada, rice, beans, chips and salsa.
    We eat there once a week. always consistent, & good, always cheap!
    Two of us eat for $15.10 + tip.
    T
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
    My next goal is to replicate those cheese biscuits from Red Lobster. I could go in there and just eat a dozen of those and be happy.
    They are fantastic! We used to get take out of a dozen plus a tub of their Caeser dressing.

    I got this recipe from an ex-employee but I'm not sure I remember it right. Not perfect but close.

    The basic biscuit is made with Bisquick following the directions on the packet. Before baking you roll them in cheese of your choice - a sharp cheddar works well or Jack if you prefer. Roll them in chopped garlic and brush with melted butter then bake. I suspect Red Lobster might add a little extra salt to the butter. We use to add some cheese to the mix too. I've never tried it, but I think I if you rolled then in chopped Jalapenos it would be good.
    Last edited by nickb; 01-13-2016 at 10:29 PM.
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    Old Timer tedmich's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nickb View Post
    They are fantastic! We used to get take out of a dozen plus a tub of their Caeser dressing.

    I got this recipe form an ex-employee but I'm not sure I remember it right. Not perfect but close.

    The basic biscuit is made with Bisquick following the directions on the packet. Before baking you roll them in cheese of your choice - a sharp cheddar works well or Jack if you prefer. Roll them in chopped garlic and brush with melted butter then bake. I suspect Red Lobster might add a little extra salt to the butter. We use to add some cheese to the mix too. I've never tried it, but I think I if you rolled then in chopped Jalapenos it would be good.
    here is another deconstruction
    Top Secret Restaurant Recipes: Red Lobster's Cheddar Biscuits - ABC News
    (don't repeat too often!)

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    Old Timer Leo_Gnardo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enzo
    Choice of gravy? Now that's my kind of restaurant
    Quote Originally Posted by rjb View Post
    Would you like brown or yellow?
    Wavy Gravy, goes with everything!

    wavygravy.jpg

    What we have in mind is breakfast in bed for 400,000.

    sun-garden-cafe.jpg

    Don't forget to vote Wavy Gravy in 2016: "U.S. OUT OF NORTH AMERICA!"
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    Brings me back, Terry, my mom's mom, (mamaw), was from Arkansas, and cooked as such. She took care of me when my mom worked, and told me my first solid food was turnip greens. My papaw got a job managing a farm south of Las Cruces during the war, and she discovered green chile, and used it a lot in her "southern style" dishes, works really well!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
    Love cornbread, and hushpuppies.
    I've no idea what you guys are eating in this thread. It's a foreign language to me. Wouldn't hush puppies be kinda tough?

    hush-puppies.jpg
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    Senior Member Enzo's Avatar
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    No, first you marinate them for a while, and then.....

    Anyone who has spotted dick on his shelf, shouldn't cast aspersions. And what is with mushing up the peas?

    You can buy official Red Lobster biscuit mix in the grocery store, I actually bought a box, but haven't tried it, I usually just make my own baked stuff. It may be Bisquick in a new box, but you add milk and egg and your own cheese.

    The wife loves Olive Garden alfredo, she orders a side of the sauce to dip the breadsticks in. I have mastered alfredo sauce in my kitchen.

    My wife found out I can make creamed peas (peas in white sauce), so she demands them a lot. Classic with salmon patties, but lovely any time. I grew up on creamed stuff. My mom made succotash (Lima beans and corn), but also served that with a cream sauce. Peas in cream sauce was a favorite. If you can't imagine those, thing classic green bean casserole, but different veggies, and not baked. I usually make my alfredo instead of basic cream sauce for those.


    We never did turnip greens so much, my mom made spinach, which I liked, and she cooked kale. I don't care for kale, bitter stuff. Greens are traditionally served with a bottle of vinegar on the table. Vinegar cuts the bitterness of many greens. Kale used to be trash greens that poor people ate, now it has gentrified into a must on foodie tables. Yuck. When McDonalds comes up with McKale, I'll know the fad has run its course.

    There is a weed in the garden called lamb's quarter, whose leaves taste like spinach but buttery when steamed. yes, it tastes just like buttered spinach, I swear. it is just a lot more work to gather the smaller leaves with more stem than spinach.

    Hush puppies are balls of cornbread batter fried.
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    g1
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    Thanks for straightening me out Dave, I was mistankenly confusing them with mudpuppies.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
    Anyone who has spotted dick on his shelf, shouldn't cast aspersions. And what is with mushing up the peas?
    We also like to eat faggots with our mushy peas

    The Great British faggot

  19. #19
    I'm a member? nickb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
    No, first you marinate them for a while, and then.....

    Anyone who has spotted dick on his shelf, shouldn't cast aspersions. And what is with mushing up the peas?

    You can buy official Red Lobster biscuit mix in the grocery store, I actually bought a box, but haven't tried it, I usually just make my own baked stuff. It may be Bisquick in a new box, but you add milk and egg and your own cheese.

    The wife loves Olive Garden alfredo, she orders a side of the sauce to dip the breadsticks in. I have mastered alfredo sauce in my kitchen.a

    Edit: I just found this - sounds like I might already have some if I just look.

    My wife found out I can make creamed peas (peas in white sauce), so she demands them a lot. Classic with salmon patties, but lovely any time. I grew up on creamed stuff. My mom made succotash (Lima beans and corn), but also served that with a cream sauce. Peas in cream sauce was a favorite. If you can't imagine those, thing classic green bean casserole, but different veggies, and not baked. I usually make my alfredo instead of basic cream sauce for those.


    We never did turnip greens so much, my mom made spinach, which I liked, and she cooked kale. I don't care for kale, bitter stuff. Greens are traditionally served with a bottle of vinegar on the table. Vinegar cuts the bitterness of many greens. Kale used to be trash greens that poor people ate, now it has gentrified into a must on foodie tables. Yuck. When McDonalds comes up with McKale, I'll know the fad has run its course.

    There is a weed in the garden called lamb's quarter, whose leaves taste like spinach but buttery when steamed. yes, it tastes just like buttered spinach, I swear. it is just a lot more work to gather the smaller leaves with more stem than spinach.

    Hush puppies are balls of cornbread batter fried.
    Care to share your Alfredo recipe? I never had any luck with it.

    I really like the sound of those lambs quarter's. I have a pretty big plot to try and grow unusual stuff but I don't know if it will grow here.
    Last edited by nickb; 01-14-2016 at 11:32 AM. Reason: Link
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    Supporting Member Chuck H's Avatar
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    "My" faux alfredo is super simple and tasty:

    Bring a non stick pan to medium heat with about 1/2 TBSP each butter and olive oil. Extra virgin is fine for this because it won't get too hot (smoke point) and it adds another flavor component.

    Crush garlic with the flat side of your chefs knife, then chop coarse. The amount is up to your tastes. I use about a bulb

    A little shallot is optional too.

    Add the garlic (shallots) to the pan and sprinkle with a pinch of salt. This will be a sweat/sauté. Not really trying for too much browning, but a little is ok.

    Add 2-3 TBSP of a good white wine. Reduce by 1/3.

    Add 1 1/2 cup cream and bring back to a simmer.

    Remove from heat. When the sauce is no longer simmering add 1 cup grated parmesan cheese (I grate my own but the pre grated stuff is fine). Add a few strokes of fresh nutmeg across a fine grater. Stir gently until blended and stop. Rest for a couple of minutes and add to the pasta.

    A common mistake with this sauce is to add the cheese while it's too hot. This can cause the sauce to "break" and the parm will lump together instead of blending. But too cool and the cheese won't melt in. It's really not that critical. Not like the white knuckles of cooking a soft egg.

    I get raves for this sauce all the time. It's not cheap to make if you use top shelf stuff, but it's easy and makes a great impression.
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    I'm a member? nickb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck H View Post
    "My" faux alfredo is super simple and tasty:

    A common mistake with this sauce is to add the cheese while it's too hot. This can cause the sauce to "break" and the parm will lump together instead of blending. But too cool and the cheese won't melt in. It's really not that critical. Not like the white knuckles of cooking a soft egg.

    I get raves for this sauce all the time. It's not cheap to make if you use top shelf stuff, but it's easy and makes a great impression.
    Call me common - that was my mistake! A few lumps of blobby cheese floating in a pool of grease is how mine turned out. Might add a tad more garlic tho...
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    Senior Member Enzo's Avatar
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    Lambs quarter is a common weed here, you may call it something else on your end of the pond. Just google the name. I suppose seeds could be bought, but I've never seen them.

    Try Chuck's recipe first. I'll dig mine out. But I don't really follow a recipe, I do it by feel. I don't stock cream or half and half, so when I make such sauce, I start with a roux, which is butter and flour over heat. Tablespoon per tablespoon of each. Then along with milk, I often add some or all of these: sour cream, cream cheese or mascarpone, certainly parmesano. Garlic of course. White pepper - gotta have zing in everything I cook.
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    ToneOholic! big_teee's Avatar
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    I looked at the pictures, but don't think we have Lambs quarter here.
    We have lots of other weeds to make up for it.
    We used to cook and eat a lot of Polk Salad.
    I grew up on it as a kid.
    Momma's cooking a crock pot of stew for Supper.
    Yum!
    T
    Last edited by big_teee; 01-14-2016 at 06:13 PM.
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    Old Timer J M Fahey's Avatar
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    Cool coolstuff here

    Thanksgiving isn't celebrated the same way here (hint, we already were in America over 100 years before the Pilgrims) but that doesn't forbid me trying some of your yummy recipes.

    Only I'll have to cut down on the grease (a little olive oil is acceptable) for obvious Health issues
    Oh well.
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    Old Timer Tom Phillips's Avatar
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    Oh Boy!
    As a guy who is being required to change diet to lower both blood sugar and cholesterol these food threads have me drooling on my keyboard.

  26. #26
    ToneOholic! big_teee's Avatar
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    I love things cooked with olive oil.
    Momma uses olive, and canola oils.
    I cook Steak on Friday nights, but we use fairly lean meat.
    I will try to get some pictures of that friday.
    Garlic is a good heart food, and we use a lot of that for seasoning, especially on meats.
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    Senior Member Enzo's Avatar
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    I have other issues, but my cholesterol has always been great, lots closer to 150 than 200. So I do use a lot of olive oil, but that sucks for popcorn, which gets either corn oil or canola. Rendered bacon fat is great for frying, sorry guys.
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    Old Timer Tom Phillips's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
    ...Rendered bacon fat is great for frying, sorry guys.
    There will be a slight interruption while I clean the drool off my keyboard.
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    Senior Member Enzo's Avatar
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    I don't consider it a home until the kitchen has a grease tin. I grew up on bacon grease. Mom always had a grease canister on the counter, and whenever we fried bacon, the grease was captured and into the tin. I had one at the old house, and finally this Xmas a got a new one for the apartment. Like this one:

    Oggi? Stainless Steel Grease Can - BedBathandBeyond.com

    A stainless canister, with a strainer/lid top. Flip up the cover and pour off grease from a skilled. The strainer catches solid stuff and the liquid grease collects below. Then when I want to fry an egg or something, I dip into the solidified grease and lube my pan.


    Bacon used to be junk meat and cheap, nowdays it is a kitchen darling and not cheap. Used to be next to the sliced bacon would be cheap boxes of "ends and pieces" of bacon, which were odd sized hunks off the ends when bacon was sliced. I sometimes bought those just to render the fat.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
    I don't consider it a home until the kitchen has a grease tin. I grew up on bacon grease. Mom always had a grease canister on the counter, and whenever we fried bacon, the grease was captured and into the tin. I had one at the old house, and finally this Xmas a got a new one for the apartment. Like this one:

    Oggi? Stainless Steel Grease Can - BedBathandBeyond.com

    A stainless canister, with a strainer/lid top. Flip up the cover and pour off grease from a skilled. The strainer catches solid stuff and the liquid grease collects below. Then when I want to fry an egg or something, I dip into the solidified grease and lube my pan.
    That sounds really 'appetising' Enzo. I'll stick with olive oil

    Bacon is still junk according to the WHO - link

    Great! I don't smoke but now I can't even have a pork pie and a pint. I should become teetotal vegan.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave H View Post
    Bacon is still junk according to the WHO - link
    I just kind of skimmed up till the last paragraph, which seemed to sum it all up .
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  32. #32
    Supporting Member Chuck H's Avatar
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    I'll back Enzo on the bacon fat. Smoked bacon is fine, but cured, lightly smoked or unsmoked bacon makes better cooking fat for most things. If you love Americana (and I do) bacon fat is good for making a lot of things. White gravy (when the meat at hand is too lean), biscuits, eggs and even pancakes, don't forget classic potato salad, etc. My grandma didn't keep a grease can though. she use to keep a thick cut piece of bacon (from the end of a slab that she would have cured and smoked herself!) in a dish near the stove top. When she needed to fat a pan she just tossed it in until enough fat was in the pan and then plucked out the bacon and put it back in the dish. Since bacon is a cured meat you can get away with this for about a week without problems. My family on my fathers side hails from Oklahoma So I do get the occasional "hankerin'" for fried green tomatoes, okra, black eyed peas, etc.
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  33. #33
    Senior Member Enzo's Avatar
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    Oh, fuck the food police.

    My eggs spike my cholesterol, and my bacon causes cancer, and contains too much sodium. MY hash brown potatoes are full of carbs. My toast lacks enough fiber, and the butter on it clogs my veins. I'd have a bowl of cereal, but they want me to use skim milk, you know that water that is white? God forbid I should put sugar on it. Maybe I could have a waffle or pancake, but alas if I butter it we are back to that. I could put syrup on it, but then I am probably having too much high fructose corn syrup. I don't know what to make of all the fructose in my... well, fruit. Apple juice is essentially sugar water anyway. Orange juice? Full of vitamin C, but also full of sugar. And acidic to bother my stomach. And my coffee? All that caffeine is bad for me.

    I put on my clothes, some of which are made with oil depleting synthetics. The cotton clothes are all made in other countries. My car burns fuel we fight wars for, and pollutes the air, as well as adding to the global warming problem. My office has too many things using electricity, which comes from coal, destroying the hillsides and atmosphere alike. The fluorescent lights upset my circadian rhythms. My candy bar is a host of sins in a colorful wrapper. More coffee, more caffeine. Good thing I don't take sugar or creamer in it.

    At lunch I can't go home, so I eat at the diner, where they have too much salt in everything, the portions are too large, way too many potatoes, everything is fried, the vegetables are barely present, and over cooked. Pie? No thanks, they'd deport me.

    Come home, decide to grill a steak. OH MY GOD, all that RED MEAT. I'll grille it on my patio grille, polluting the air with charcoal smoke, and burnt meat juice smoke. The flames on the drippings create nitrosamines - cancer agents.

    Oh fuck it.... I think I'll just lay down and die. Goodbye.
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

  34. #34
    Senior Member Enzo's Avatar
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    Actually, bacon grease is simply rendered pork fat. You can buy it in the store, where it is called lard. The grease I harvest has some added flavor from the bacon and the bacon curing process, so it is delightful for frying eggs.

    "Maryland fried chicken" is fried chicken cooked in bacon grease instead of shortening or oil.
    Justin Thomas likes this.
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

  35. #35
    Senior Member Enzo's Avatar
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    Some grocery stores have pig parts, like ears, snouts, jowls, and tails. Used to be we'd get a tail, which had a round patch of butt still attached, and using the tail itself as a handle, we'd grease a pan with the butt part. Sizzle enough fat off the thing to grease the pan.
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

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