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Thread: Cereal Box

  1. #1
    Supporting Member Jazz P Bass's Avatar
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    Cereal Box

    Is it me???

    I went to open up a box of cereal & when I got to the bag I was baffled.

    I couldn't tear it open.

    I had to get out my Saws All.

    I am all for consumer safety & all that (remember the Tylenol poisoning ?) but sheesh.

    Is there really a need to 'weld' the plastic bags shut?

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    ...and the irony is that cereal used to have prizes inside. So now the contents are of less value, but harder to get into. What's up with that?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazz P Bass View Post
    I had to get out my Saws All.
    Cereal killer!
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    Old Timer Leo_Gnardo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Hammer View Post
    ...and the irony is
    You get your minimum daily requirement of irony, right there. Plus exercise. Builds strong bodies what, eleven ways?
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    ToneOholic! big_teee's Avatar
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    We bought the bargain 50 cent corndogs this week at sonic.
    They gave us an ample supply of catsup and mustard?
    That is, if you can open the packages.
    I finally got up from the table, to get scissors to open the mustard.
    It's like they are watching from above, to see if you can actually get them open?
    T
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    Supporting Member Steve A.'s Avatar
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    Hmmm... the last time I had problems opening cereal the bag split open down the side and spilled all over the place! (The traditional rule for cereal and snack bags has always been that they should tear open neatly without the need for tools- violators of that rule shall be terminated!)

    My complaint has been that they have been making the boxes too tall so that they tip over very easily. And *all* of the various sizes of each cereal have the exact same shape so that you will usually grab the box that isn't on sale... Anything to increase the profits of the cereal mfg and grocery store!

    Malt-o-Meal (remember them?) and some of the other generic brands use boxes that will not tip over easily.

    Steve A.

    P.S. Shopping tip: if the lady in front of you has two of each and every item she is probably enrolled in the W.I.C. program which used to have separate vouchers for each item (if you thought you'd make a quick run to the store for more chips during half-time fuhgettaboutit!)

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    Old Timer Leo_Gnardo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by big_teee View Post
    We bought the bargain 50 cent corndogs this week at sonic.
    They gave us an ample supply of catsup and mustard?
    That is, if you can open the packages.
    I finally got up from the table, to get scissors to open the mustard.
    It's like they are watching from above, to see if you can actually get them open?
    T
    Wonder if this sort of shortcoming had anything to do with our local Sonic gone clean out-of-bizness, kapoot. I thought Sonic was a sure fire can't fail franchise?

  8. #8
    Senior Member Enzo's Avatar
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    The current crop of inner cereal bags are tough. I found a special tool, in fact I already had one, it looked like this:

    original-orange-handled-scissors-8_width306.jpg
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    Old Timer Leo_Gnardo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
    The current crop of inner cereal bags are tough. I found a special tool, in fact I already had one, it looked like this
    'Zackly like mine, whadda coincidence. Works on chip bags too. 2 for a $5-6-7 depending which store. One for the kitchen, t'other for the workbench. This time hooray for made-in-China.

  10. #10
    g1
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    All that kind of packaging is getting much more difficult to open. I suppose it is because of security/tampering concerns.
    Even the cardboard boxes such as mac n cheese are tough to open without tools.
    The clamshell stuff is the worst. They have special heavy duty 'clamshell scissors' or 'plastic package openers'.
    All of which, of course, are designed to make us feel old and weak.
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    I think it's for storage/transport reasons.

    As a society, we are sourcing our foods from farther and farther away. It is now possible to buy out-of-season fruits and vegetables year-round because they are being flown in from the southern hemisphere. That was not the case when I was a kid.

    Our cereals are probably all boxed in one town in the Midwest and shipped all over the USA, if not the world. It is even possible some are being boxed in China and shipped here. Certainly I am buying Japanese foods packaged in Japan, and it comes out tasting super-fresh. So the packaging must be absolutely airtight, with no chance of leakage in or out. One of my former neighbors was a honey importer--the honey was being bottled in China and shipped here, so it could end up sitting in a shipping container for weeks before getting to store shelves.

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    Old Timer Leo_Gnardo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dchang0 View Post
    Our cereals are probably all boxed in one town in the Midwest and shipped all over the USA, if not the world. It is even possible some are being boxed in China and shipped here.
    At the supermarkets there's a couple of lines of super cheap jam & jelly made in China. Considering the problems with food adulteration there, I avoid them entirely. Couple years ago there was "apple juice", made of chemicals & sugar, not an apple within a mile of it. Next, in a similar formula honey from China likely isn't made by bees. I avoid it also and recommend, support your local beekeepers.

  13. #13
    Supporting Member Jazz P Bass's Avatar
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    Remember the 'glue' in the toothpaste fiasco?

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    Old Timer J M Fahey's Avatar
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    We are getting Chinese apple juice which is not so, the chinese jam which is not so, I bet one of these days weŽll start getting this kind of chinese "girls":
    Juan Manuel Fahey

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    Supporting Member eschertron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leo_Gnardo View Post
    support your local beekeepers.
    The way I understand it, part of the appeal of honey is that it contains a plethora of micro-organisms, all of which have been neutralized* by the enzymes in the honey. Which benefits the immune system by supplying a booster 'shot' in every squeeze! So another reason to buy local. Buff up against local germs!

    *or mostly neutralized, which is why I'm told babies and folks with immune deficiencies should not eat raw honey.
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Conner View Post
    If it still won't get loud enough, it's probably broken.

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    Old Timer Leo_Gnardo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazz P Bass View Post
    Remember the 'glue' in the toothpaste fiasco?
    February 2007 BBC started reporting on people getting sick in Central America from cough syrup made with ethylene glycol. I figured "how long 'til this XXXX starts showing up in the USA?" Not long - cheap toothpaste with ethylene glycol (usually used as engine coolant, and toxic) started showing up here in May. Turns out a Chinese chemical company figured out ethylene glycol was cheaper than glycerine, and started shipping relabeled drums of glycol when glycerine was ordered. Gly this gly that, close enough for rock n roll, right? Not long after that cats and dogs were dying from melamine powder being used to increase the tested amount of protein in pet food, then Chinese babies were suffering from the stuff being added to infant formula. For the melamine fiasco, one executive was executed. For the glycol, that seemed to settle down after a couple months. But there's always an attraction to making a couple extra renminbi by subbing in some cheap stuff. I'll buy Chinese-made electronic parts but food, not so much.

    Quote Originally Posted by eschertron
    The way I understand it, part of the appeal of honey is that it contains a plethora of micro-organisms
    I dunno about micro-organisms there, I suppose there are some. But unfiltered honey does contain a fair amount of pollen. If you get it locally, by consuming that honey you get exposed to pollen from local plants and that's supposed to help your immune system "get used to it", presumably that can result in less severe reactions to airborne pollen, thereby reducing "hay fever." Not much point in getting say California honey in New York if you're looking for that result. Your local beekeepers could do more than sweeten your life in only one way.

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    I wonder if the traditional wax paper bags were either a) containing stuff that wasn't so good for ya, b) not as cost effective as current plastic bags. or c) there had been cases involving tampering, or d) some combination of these.

    And hey, what ever happened to wax paper? I find people tend not to use it nearly as much these days.

  18. #18
    Senior Member potatofarmer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leo_Gnardo View Post
    February 2007 BBC started reporting on people getting sick in Central America from cough syrup made with ethylene glycol. I figured "how long 'til this XXXX starts showing up in the USA?" Not long - cheap toothpaste with ethylene glycol (usually used as engine coolant, and toxic) started showing up here in May. Turns out a Chinese chemical company figured out ethylene glycol was cheaper than glycerine, and started shipping relabeled drums of glycol when glycerine was ordered. Gly this gly that, close enough for rock n roll, right? Not long after that cats and dogs were dying from melamine powder being used to increase the tested amount of protein in pet food, then Chinese babies were suffering from the stuff being added to infant formula. For the melamine fiasco, one executive was executed. For the glycol, that seemed to settle down after a couple months. But there's always an attraction to making a couple extra renminbi by subbing in some cheap stuff. I'll buy Chinese-made electronic parts but food, not so much.
    Probably "ethylene glycol" vs "polyethylene glycol". Even consumers confuse the two, though there's now a campaign of people who claim that PEG-based laxatives cause psychosis in children. No word on if they noticed the PEG also in the cough syrup, toothpaste, sports drinks, etc... I remember back in the 80s there were a lot of parents warning each other that Sunny Delight "contained antifreeze" which seems preposterous now in a world before social media that some evil corporation was deliberately trying to poison as many kids as possible unless they had Good Parents(tm).

    To further confuse things, propylene glycol is being used in non-toxic antifreeze now, and glycerine is also known as glycerol. I kind of wish IUPAC names were used for everything, but not many people would want to put (2R,3R,4S,5S,6R)-2-[(2S,3S,4S,5R)-3,4-Dihydroxy-2,5-bis(hydroxymethyl)oxolan-2-yl]oxy-6-(hydroxymethyl)oxane-3,4,5-triol in their coffee.

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    Supporting Member eschertron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leo_Gnardo View Post
    I dunno about micro-organisms there, I suppose there are some.
    I have it from a trusted source (TV, not the internet, HEY!) that immune-deficient persons, such as children under 1yo, are at risk of being infected by Botulinum found in raw honey.

    I'm all for becoming resistant to microbes found in the environment, like those found in locally-brewed beers and ales
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Conner View Post
    If it still won't get loud enough, it's probably broken.

  20. #20
    Supporting Member Jazz P Bass's Avatar
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    (2R,3R,4S,5S,6R)-2-[(2S,3S,4S,5R)-3,4-Dihydroxy-2,5-bis(hydroxymethyl)oxolan-2-yl]oxy-6-(hydroxymethyl)oxane-3,4,5-triol

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sucrose
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  21. #21
    Supporting Member Jazz P Bass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eschertron View Post
    I have it from a trusted source (TV, not the internet, HEY!) that immune-deficient persons, such as children under 1yo, are at risk of being infected by Botulinum found in raw honey.

    I'm all for becoming resistant to microbes found in the environment, like those found in locally-brewed beers and ales
    Just to be clear on this, the Botulinum Spores are what is in the honey.

    The spores are everywhere.

    It's the Bacteria that 'hatches' from the spores that is the concern.

    The bacteria itself cannot survive in the honey.
    Once they are ingested they open up & the bacteria reproduces.
    In a healthy adult, the immune system takes the bacteria out.

    In a newborn infant or those who have a compromised immune system, the bacteria can be a problem.

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    Supporting Member eschertron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazz P Bass View Post
    Just to be clear on this, the Botulinum Spores are what is in the honey.

    The spores are everywhere.

    It's the Bacteria that 'hatches' from the spores that is the concern.

    The bacteria itself cannot survive in the honey.
    Once they are ingested they open up & the bacteria reproduces.
    In a healthy adult, the immune system takes the bacteria out.

    In a newborn infant or those who have a compromised immune system, the bacteria can be a problem.
    Isn't that true of any bacterium? I mentioned Botulinum by name because it is of primary concern in regard to infants.
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Conner View Post
    If it still won't get loud enough, it's probably broken.

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    Old Timer Leo_Gnardo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Hammer View Post
    And hey, what ever happened to wax paper? I find people tend not to use it nearly as much these days.
    Roll up wax paper with aluminum foil, you can make some humongous home made capacitors. Uh oh we're on to capacitors now, what's that, a thread jump?

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    Didja know that Ben Franklin used to kill chickens with "Leyden" capacitor jars. He experimented with making caps, but there were no DMMs and he wasn't about to assess the number of amperes on himself. So he discharged the caps on chickens.

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    Old Timer Leo_Gnardo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Hammer View Post
    Didja know that Ben Franklin used to kill chickens with "Leyden" capacitor jars. He experimented with making caps, but there were no DMMs and he wasn't about to assess the number of amperes on himself. So he discharged the caps on chickens.
    Guess there was no PETA around back then either. Ben must have heard the review from one of the first guys to discharge a Leyden jar on himself: "I thought it was all up with me."

    I had some friends at Newark College of Engineering @ 1970 who made foil & wax paper caps. They discharged them thru homemade rail guns, shooting magnetized nails out the lab window & across the city. Being careful of course to not stand behind the rail gun because it never was clear which direction the nail would fly.

    And I thought wax paper is what Mom wraps your lunch sandwich in before she sends you off to school. Them was the good ol' days.

  26. #26
    rjb
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leo_Gnardo View Post
    Uh oh we're on to capacitors now, what's that, a thread jump?
    Speaking of which, how did we get through the "Chinese contamination" segment of the program without anyone mentioning the Great Capacitor Plague?
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capacitor_plague
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    Neither PETA organizations (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, People for the Ethical Treatment of Africans) were around at that time in history. I gather it is safe to assume that the chickens involved were destined for the soup pot or roasting pan later that day anyway.

    I suspect a lot of moms have resorted to resealable plastic bags, largely because assuring the containment of a sandwich in one's lunchbox, using wax paper, demands a certain level of skill in wrapping, folding, and crease-making technique. Yet another lost art.

  28. #28
    Old Timer Leo_Gnardo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Hammer View Post
    Neither PETA organizations (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, People for the Ethical Treatment of Africans) were around at that time in history. I gather it is safe to assume that the chickens involved were destined for the soup pot or roasting pan later that day anyway.

    I suspect a lot of moms have resorted to resealable plastic bags, largely because assuring the containment of a sandwich in one's lunchbox, using wax paper, demands a certain level of skill in wrapping, folding, and crease-making technique. Yet another lost art.
    But People Eating Tasty Animals has been around since forever. yum!

    Early open-end fold type plastic bags were just awful, sandwiches fell out too easy. You can mark the invention of the zip-lok bag as the end of the line for wax paper treatment of sammitches. Geeze I'm gettin' hungry now...

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    And as Warren Zevon said, the secret to life is to enjoy every sandwich.
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    Supporting Member Jazz P Bass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eschertron View Post
    Isn't that true of any bacterium? .
    Not really.

    Try ingesting e coli & see how you feel.
    That is a live, active bacteria.

    I simply wanted to point out that in honey, it's still in the spore stage. (like an egg).

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    Supporting Member eschertron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazz P Bass View Post
    Not really.

    Try ingesting e coli & see how you feel.
    That is a live, active bacteria.

    I simply wanted to point out that in honey, it's still in the spore stage. (like an egg).
    I'm agreeing with you - I think? The antiseptic properties of honey will kill any active bacteria, so I'm told. Bacteria can and do remain viable in a spore stage, and I've been led to believe that all bacteria do that. Is botulinum more resistant to honey than other bacters, or do the 'everyday household' varieties not routinely spore?
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Conner View Post
    If it still won't get loud enough, it's probably broken.

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    Old Timer Leo_Gnardo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eschertron View Post
    The antiseptic properties of honey will kill any active bacteria, so I'm told.
    Honey's long been used in "folk medicine", so I expect there's something to be said in its favor. Always good for a sore throat, lemon & honey in tea, maybe with a shot of whisky or rum, make ya feel better anyway.

    Manuka honey from New Zealand has been mentioned positively in treatment of "golden staph" skin infections, which resist treatment with normal antibiotics.

    Fake honey will just give you the leaping fantods, the colliewobbles, spike your blood sugar, and put hard working bees out of a job.
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  33. #33
    Supporting Member Jazz P Bass's Avatar
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    Hah.

    My youngest son won't touch the stuff.

    He calls it "Bee Spit".
    Last edited by Jazz P Bass; 02-22-2017 at 05:49 AM.
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  34. #34
    Supporting Member eschertron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazz P Bass View Post
    Hah.

    My youngest son won.t touch the stuff.

    He calls it "Bee Spit".
    Good thing your son is not a baby bird! Their food is worse than spit! Yecch!
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Conner View Post
    If it still won't get loud enough, it's probably broken.

  35. #35
    Old Timer Leo_Gnardo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazz P Bass View Post
    My youngest son won.t touch the stuff. He calls it "Bee Spit".
    Introduce junior to bee propolis, that's what comes out the other end. Mmmm, good! Also claimed to have medicinal properties but def not what you want to put on your muffins.

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