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Thread: Alzheimer light!

  1. #1
    Old Timer tedmich's Avatar
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    Alzheimer light!

    So I heard a RadioLab interview with an MIT Researcher who has found that 40Hz light causes brain cell synchronization which helps to clear amyloid in experimental mice. Originally it was a tad...invasive with fiber optics bringing the light into specific brain structures via little drilled holes...BUT they found that ambient light through the eyeballs has the same effect!

    So I'm going to make a very powerful LED light using a 185W Meanwell CC SMPS I laid in for ..agricultural lighting... and make a few Alzheimer lights for my Dad, in his 80's and slowing down.

    I plan to use a 555 based PWM circuit with both frequency and duty cycle individually adjustable (using 2 555's like this)

    028_02.gif

    I figure I'll include a switch for the magic 40Hz (and since the damn fluorescents at 60Hz do not seem to have staved off this epidemic ) but maybe also a 20-200Hz variable feature and also a very beefy transistor or MOSFET to allow the ~52v /185w through at least part of the time. I can't see him running it at 100% duty cycle with the >27,000 lm 2700-4000k Bridgelux Vero 22's I'm planning on having wired in, but he can light the whole room like a summer day if he needs it! It'll be a sun-like hemisphere that can go on a table or the wall.

    A simple frequency meter might be nice to have too, but I'm going to bang this out quickly! I got 40 of the SMPS so maybe I'll sell these on Ebay...

  2. #2
    Old Timer J M Fahey's Avatar
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    Hi Tedmich, can you please link to the original MIT article?

    Iīm all for experimenting but since in this case it involves your loved and irreplaceabe Dad Iīd be very vary cautious, in any case check with is Doctor or Neurologist first.

    Flashing lights can and do have a strong effect on human mind, I speak from personal experience because I designed and sold "Disco Light" flash units, the first ones in Argentina ... designed and made from scratch just based on a Newspaper report about NY Studio 54, go figure.

    Among many other things, experimented a lot on supplies, triggers, frequencies, flash tube overheating, etc. and quickly found that certain frequencies had a powerdul effect.
    Some were very annoying and unbearable, others were "hypnotical", I set the speed pot to that particular frequency and "couldnīt let go" and/or lost some perception on what was around, fully focusing on the blinking lamp.

    Not personal but read on "serious" sources talked about seizures caused on epileptic people at certain frequencies.

    That said, given eye slow/integrating response to light pulses, which happens in the eye itself light detector , which is chemical and depends on certain photochemical reactions happening, even before being sent along a nerve , and way before brain processing, makes me think that brain will receive 40 Hz light like continuous light plus a little ripple.

    In my experiments the psychoactive frequencies were WAY lower, on the order of 1 to, say, 5 Hz.

    There is one frequency, which I *guess* matches the eye cell ON/OFF time constants which is mind boggling.

    I guess light intensity also plays a role: I bet that a couple blinking Leds at that frequency wonīt do too much, but a powerful flash tube wipes everything else out ... even if less than a millisecond wide.
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    Juan Manuel Fahey

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    Old Timer Leo_Gnardo's Avatar
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    Some of those light shows at concerts we attended back in the late 60's & 70's should have a significant preventive effect then, right? I feel better already!

  4. #4
    Old Timer tedmich's Avatar
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    "I designed and sold "Disco Light" flash units, the first ones in Argentina"
    was a side effect cocaine usage unprotected sex and herpes? Couldn't resist Juan...


    Here is the woman who originated the research
    Unique visual stimulation may be new treatment for Alzheimer?s | MIT News

    Their original paper was in Nature and is pay-walled very effectively, unfortunately.

    its light at the so-called gamma frequency 20-100Hz. PS I have a Ph.D. in biochemistry and work in the Biotech/medical device field, there are lots of "ifs" in this mouse model but I really doubt it will hurt dad or make him worse. Worst case scenaio he gets a nice (if flickery) room light to treat his Seasonal affective disorder (SAD)
    Last edited by tedmich; 02-25-2017 at 10:32 PM.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Enzo's Avatar
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    And hopefully doesn't trigger eppilepsy.

    What is the light source? Yopu driving flourescents with 40Hz? You want to make a extra bright LED array?

    I don't think of 555s if I want stable freqs, myself. You could make a power oscillator - basically an inverter like for camping - with a stable freq source. I don;t know if floursecent fixtures will run well on 40Hz, the flicker is probably visible.
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    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

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    What "works" in mice is not a particularly good explanation or model of how cognition (and declines in) works in humans. At the very least, one should be sceptical of the easy generalizability of phenomena is a species that lives for maybe a year to a pathology in a species where it tends not to show up for 60-70 years. There is also the not insignificant question of how long the application of such a treatment is supposed to be. You can't make humans spend the brunt of their day exposed to unusual light conditions or conditions that restrict their movement the way you can with mice.

    That said, sometimes the most counter-intuitive things really do work. My late father was on his second stroke, and told that he would never regain his sense of balance. He came out to visit us and I arranged for him to meet with my supervisor's wife, who worked in rehab medicine. She was using, of all things, vibrators as therapy for recovering stroke patients, based on a surfeit of anecdotal clinical cases where patients regularly exposed to forms of intense vibration in the afflicted region of the body recovered faster than expected. I watched in amazement as she asked my dad to walk and pivot (which normally took him about eight shuffling steps just to turn around), then placed a huge schvanz into his right hand, and cranked up the intensity knob. He still looked and walked like George Burns in his late 90's (even though he was only 61), but when he turned, he smoothly pivoted on one foot, as if he had been bullshitting us for years about his lack of balance. It was as close to a miracle as I've ever seen. Though he had to figure out ways to conceal his "little friend" up his shirt sleeve, he never used a cane again. I have to emphasize that it was a treatment that improved one aspect of functioning while applied, but not a cure. In the absence of the intense vibration, he still had the same balance issues, and any other consequences of the stroke were still in evidence.. But the balance thing was vastly improved in the presence of vibration. The therapist indicated that, as far as she was concerned, there wasn't anything particularly special about vibratory stimulation. The stroke was in an area that integrated multipled sensory modalities. So, it could have been loud noise or bright flashing lights., but vibration was something that could be applied in a nonintrusive, nondisruptive, and relatively private way, whereas loud noise was not gonna work well in a nursing home or apartment building.

    I spent almost a decade studying cognitive aging and treatments for it; particularly pharmacological treatments. Typically, what linked the various treatments showing glimmering hints of improvement were things that, one way or another, improved cerebrovascular circulation, including exercise, being a non-smoker, etc. What too often gets ignored or poorly understood by the neurochemists is how cognition actually works. It's not the passive machine that it often gets viewed as. Human thinking is the result of deliberate strategies that become defaults over time, almost like posture is the result of what you regularly do and eventually can't stop doing. Drugs don't and can't reverse habit. Sadly.
    Last edited by Mark Hammer; 02-26-2017 at 05:50 PM.
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  7. #7
    Senior Member Enzo's Avatar
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    I know nothing of this stuff, but in my mind, I wonder if the external stimulation might help in the way adding noise helps one sleep. As in those white noise generators for the bedroom. Increasing the noise level to the nerves masks tiny little variations that maybe were being over processed (or under). MAybe?
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    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

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    ToneOholic! big_teee's Avatar
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    Non related, but I have noticeable short term memory loss, the last few years.
    I have been doing various computer games, and online memory exercises, and it does seem to help.
    I still lose my coffee cup now and then, though!
    T
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    This is interesting; I have experience with this disease in my family and it is truly an awful thing, so anything that might help seems worthy of experiment.

    I don't know if this is any use, but I run my lathe on a single- to three-phase VFD (variable frequency drive) which takes single-phase 240v and puts out 3-phase at anywhere from 0-200 Hz, controlled with an external pot. Mine is rated for a 3hp motor and cost only about $200 although it was new surplus. They do exist in single- to single-phase versions as well as smaller sizes of course. As you already have the SMPS maybe building the extra circuitry may not be too expensive, but I thought the VFD might be worth a look as a potential ready-made solution. I should mention that mine at least produces a fair bit of high frequency (8 or 16kHz I think) switching noise which could be a drawback if it doesn't have a big motor and gearbox to hide behind.

    Good luck with your experiment,

    Andy

  10. #10
    Senior Member Enzo's Avatar
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    tee

    noticeable short term memory loss, the last few years.
    A few years ago I complained to my doctors I was losing it. I couldn;t rememebr words, I couldn;t always make a sentence. Mostly they said "Oh you're just getting older, perfectly normal." I knew something was wrong. Three doctors later, it wasn't until I wound up in the hospital with CHF that we discovered there was no oxygen in my blood. No wonder my brain didn;t work. Put on the oxygen thingie and my mental acuity instantly returned.

    I have a little oximeter at home, and every doctor office has one. It takes seconds and is not invasive. You stick your finger in the clip and it uses infrared light. Your condition may have zero to do with oxygen, but if you have not checked it, why not try?
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  11. #11
    Old Timer Leo_Gnardo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
    it wasn't until I wound up in the hospital with CHF that we discovered there was no oxygen in my blood. No wonder my brain didn;t work. Put on the oxygen thingie and my mental acuity instantly returned.
    Similar with one of my customers. A talented jazzer, he swore his guitars & amps were sounding off, went into a panic swapping pickups & getting his amp fixed - which it needed badly. Once sorted, still could not be satisfied. Then I didn't hear from him for a year. 3 stents later . . . I hope some more oxygen is getting to his brain now. He was getting downright obnoxious. It's a helluva thing to not hear your gear working right when it IS, and the ol' brain is not sensing it.

    In another case an aging (75-ish) pedal steeler complains his rig's not sounding good, although his playing is fabulous & tone leaves nothing to complain about. Emphysema - decades of cigarettes now leave him almost unable to breathe. Nice old guy I wish I could help, but the problem is other than his music gear.

    Thanx Enzo for the suggestion on the oximiter test. Evvabody, pester your doc with this next exam & from now on.
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  12. #12
    Old Timer Tom Phillips's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
    ...Three doctors later, it wasn't until I wound up in the hospital with CHF that we discovered there was no oxygen in my blood. No wonder my brain didn't work. Put on the oxygen thingie and my mental acuity instantly returned...
    It has been my experience with doctors, car mechanics and other service people that it often takes multiple tries of clear, focused and strong explanations to get a point across. In a recent case, after I explained a problem I was having with my eyeglasses the doctor said that "I should have said something earlier." I replied that I had and then presented him with a written log file of the problems, what I had told the opticians and what they had done / not done about it over the last 18 months. That finally got the attention I needed and the problem was solved. I'm not telling people that's what they should do. Just pointing out that it is common for a specific condition to be misdiagnosed or (it seems like) ignored.

    The most significant situation that I recently experienced was a good friend telling me that he had been feeling unusually tired and couldn't figure out why. The very next day he died of a heart attack. That was a practical life troubleshooting situation and it points out the need to determine what is causing the symptoms. The trouble is that there are many things that could cause fatigue and you don't want to cross the line to become a hypochondriac.

    I started researching available oximeters and it seems like a very useful device to have for the price. I have also often wondered what it would be like to have oxygen available so you could take a hit for a boost of some sort. Saw football players using it on the sidelines during the Superbowl. Why not use it as a desk jockey for a potential jolt of clarity?

  13. #13
    Senior Member Enzo's Avatar
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    Oximiter is simple and not expensive. I also have a blood pressure thingie, turns out it is the same one my dentist uses. yeah, they check BP now too. A little Omron unit. Again easy to use and not expensive. I no longer monitor my BP, since I never have had high BP, it is real stable. I have other things wrong. I check oxy all the time.

    Adding oxygen really only helps if you are short of it. It really doesn;t help recover after exertion. The benefit for football players is mainly psychological. If your blood is fully oxygenated, there is no place for more oxygen to go. it is like soaking a sponge in a glass of water. The sponge won't get any wetter if you put in a pail of water.

    But any medical supply place has it, you could get a tank and regulator with a canula tube and check it out if you like.
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

  14. #14
    Old Timer J M Fahey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
    And hopefully doesn't trigger eppilepsy.
    This, or something similar is my concern.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photosensitive_epilepsy

    I don;t know if floursecent fixtures will run well on 40Hz, the flicker is probably visible.
    Well, thatīs the point .
    If eyes/brain time constant is long enough it will integrate and average light pulses into n average illumination vlue plus a much attenuated 8although somewhat detected flicker.

    Easy to understand to us electronics guys: discontinuous voltage, such as mains one is rectified into still discontinuous (it reaches zero 100/120 times per second) raw voltage which is then integrated by capacitors and/or inductors into a continuous average voltage plus some remains of original pulsing one, which we call ripple.

    I imagine light pulsing at 40 Hz might go through a similar averaging process.

    After all we can not detect regular cinema 24 frame per second speed so we "see" movement as continuous, same with TV which in practice runs at half mains speed (25 or 30 frames per second) because screen display is interlaced .

    Oh well, in any case hope this research (and others) keeps improving Medicine

    EDIT: this is what happened during a Pokemon anime scene:
    Twenty minutes into the episode, there is a scene in which Pikachu stops "vaccine" missiles with its Thunderbolt attack, resulting in a huge explosion that flashes red and blue lights.[1][5] Although there were similar parts in the episode with red and blue flashes, two anime techniques, "paka paka"[a] and "flash"[b] made this scene extremely intense.[6] These flashes were bright strobe lights, with blinks at a rate of about 12 Hz for approximately six seconds.[7]

    At this point, viewers started to complain of blurred vision, headaches, dizziness and nausea.[1][5][8] Some experienced seizures, blindness, convulsions and loss of consciousness.[1][5] Japan's Fire Defense Agency reported that a total of 685 viewers – 310 boys and 375 girls – were taken to hospitals by ambulances.[5][9] Although many victims recovered during the ambulance trip, more than 150 of them were admitted to hospitals.[5][9] Two people remained hospitalized for more than two weeks.[9] Some other people had seizures when parts of the scene were rebroadcast during news reports on the seizures.[8] Only a small fraction of the 685 children treated were diagnosed with photosensitive epilepsy.[10] This phenomenon was later called "Pokémon Shock".[1][11]
    Oh well.
    Juan Manuel Fahey

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    The relationship between physiological status and cognition is similar to that of driving and one's windshield. If you're a decent driver, having a clear windshield helps in supporting your best driving habits, and having a filthy or ice-coated windshield, that's hard to see through, undermines and challenges your best driving habits, increasing the workload. If you're a lousy or unskilled driver, the state of the windshield makes a bigger impact, and if you don't know how to drive, the state of your windshield is nearly moot. The physiology is simply a context for what the person deliberately does and knows how to do. For those whose cognition is reasonably well-tuned and not otherwise compromised, enhanced cerebrovascular circulation, and/or pharmacological "cognitive enhancers" will help to maintain or support what you already do and know how to do. Folks who still try to do what they do when thinking and remembering will experience it as being less effortful. For those whose cognitive capacity has become compromised in some manner, conceivably by the sum of many teensy strokes, or long-term substance abuse, or a neurodegenerative disease "already in progress", the cognitive habits already established tend not to be eradicated by "clearing the windshield". At least not immediately. Conceivably, or in theory, they could be trained to adopt more planful and strategic thinking, but we're talking months and months of training to become "cognitively buff", and I don't know that any researchers have tried that.

    I worked on one of the first detailed use-it-or-lose-it studies in the late 1980's (published in 1992), where we administered detailed inventories of daily activities to a large sample of seniors, along with detailed inquiries about their health and a huge battery of cognitive measures. We found that being "active" was not associated with greater cognitive status, but health and smoking was.

    So keep those capillaries clean, kids.

  16. #16
    Old Timer tedmich's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
    I know nothing of this stuff, but in my mind, I wonder if the external stimulation might help in the way adding noise helps one sleep. As in those white noise generators for the bedroom. Increasing the noise level to the nerves masks tiny little variations that maybe were being over processed (or under). MAybe?
    There is recent data that suggests sleeping with pink noise slows the progression of dementia in humans!

  17. #17
    Old Timer Leo_Gnardo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tedmich View Post
    There is recent data that suggests sleeping with pink noise slows the progression of dementia in humans!
    How am I supposed to know what color the noise is if my eyes are closed? And I'm sleeping besides?
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  18. #18
    Old Timer tedmich's Avatar
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    Here is a prototype PCB

    556-40hz-dimmer.jpg
    using this circuit
    dual-555.jpg

    it utilizes a nifty little Diodes Inc regulator (ZXTR2012K-13 for 12v or ZXTR2005K-13 for 5v) that can make 50-60mA from up to 100VDC in a little TO-252 SMD pkg,
    also a 14 SOIC TI NE556DR dual timer that can run on 5-16VDC will take the place of the (2) 555s

    The freq pot is 500k and should allow me to fine tune to precisely 40Hz and the duty control can be an on board trimmer or remote pot for dim to blinding.

    the TIP will probably give way to a big N-Channel Enhancement Mode MOSFET (maybe an isolated unit capable of handling 200w, $!) once I mock it up.

    This PWM unit should be able to handle one of the (40) Meanwell HLG-185-48A units I have driving about 5x Bridgelux Vero18's (22k lumens total).

    The Vero's and MOSFET will get BIG heatsinking
    Last edited by tedmich; 04-04-2017 at 03:24 AM.

  19. #19
    Old Timer tedmich's Avatar
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    Well its been a while and Mom reports that Dad could really use this (if effective) so I used an off the shelf PWM circuit from Hong Kong

    https://www.ebay.com/myb/WatchList

    It was one of the few PWN units with completely independent duty cycle and frequency and capable of the "magic" 40Hz

    its fed with a Meanwell HLG 185 48v power supply, set up for 36v, thats stepped down with an LM2596HV based buck converter to 12v just for the relay driver while the LEDs get full 36v through the relay.

    Its housed in a section of 5x2 al rectangular tube and drives a Crydom DC DC relay (ED06D5 ) thats good to 49v 5A and capable of PWM dimming to about 400Hz

    The light itself is 4 x BXRE-30E4000-B-73 Bridgelux COBs, that are a warm 3000K temp and capable of about 25,000 lumens. These are mounted on a 1/8 Al sheet with acrylice diffuser and an odd copper braid heatsink (the whole unit gets to 65-70C when full on)

    At lower duty cycles the 40Hz is pretty hallucinatory and may be too challenging to sit still for. Its causing coordinated neuron firing so this is to be expected. The penultimate duty cycle has a minor perceived flicker and is hella bright. The highest setting is steady and there is very little perceived brightness differences (duh!) so the 40Hz flashing just gets more intense at the lower duty cycles. There's no good way to modulate brightness on a 40Hz flash except maybe current limiting, which the HLG does quite well.

    The PWM circuit while good is VERY delicate, any pressure on board or switch shaft causes the switch to gap and deposit all its tiny ball bearing on the floor, after which it will not turn ;(

    glad I bought two, I've encased the switch portion of the board in electronics grade silicone.

    The frame for the light (which can be placed upright on a table, hung from wall like picture or layed flat on table, maybe with added heat measures) is a beautiful birdseye maple (a gift from Dad) with 5x coats Liberon Finishing oil and topped with Renaissance Wax and is very pretty and deep looking.
    Last edited by tedmich; 08-26-2017 at 10:24 PM.
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  20. #20
    g1
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    I hope it gives good results, keep us posted.
    "there's another kind of party lights that I can't stand to see,
    when there's a man in that patrol car and he don't wanna party with me"

  21. #21
    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J M Fahey View Post
    ...
    Among many other things, experimented a lot on supplies, triggers, frequencies, flash tube overheating, etc. and quickly found that certain frequencies had a powerdul effect.
    Some were very annoying and unbearable, others were "hypnotical", I set the speed pot to that particular frequency and "couldnīt let go" and/or lost some perception on what was around, fully focusing on the blinking lamp.
    Has anyone noticed that in recent years, every police department in the USA has switched over to using a combination of red and blue strobed lights on their vehicles? It used to be that Chicago was blue only, with slow-rotating beacons. Now even Chicago has adopted the variable pulse frequency red and blue strobes. It seems that studies have shown that the rapid pulsing of red and blue lights is more effective in conveying a sense of "urgency" to drivers being passed by pursuit vehicles, while lower frequencies result in inhibition of various voluntary actions. In other words, they are using the effects that Juan described to physiologically impair your ability to resist, thereby forcing you to submit. The next time you see a police car chase someone and pull them over, pay attention to what they're doing and how they change the speed of their lights.
    "Stand back, I'm holding a calculator." - chinrest

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    Senior Member SoulFetish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bob p View Post
    Has anyone noticed that in recent years, every police department in the USA has switched over to using a combination of red and blue strobed lights on their vehicles? It used to be that Chicago was blue only, with slow-rotating beacons. Now even Chicago has adopted the variable pulse frequency red and blue strobes. It seems that studies have shown that the rapid pulsing of red and blue lights is more effective in conveying a sense of "urgency" to drivers being passed by pursuit vehicles, while lower frequencies result in inhibition of various voluntary actions. In other words, they are using the effects that Juan described to physiologically impair your ability to resist, thereby forcing you to submit. The next time you see a police car chase someone and pull them over, pay attention to what they're doing and how they change the speed of their lights.
    I'm almost positive that out here, they are still all blue. But then again, if I do see flashing lights, it's usually for a second or two before I pull out my wallet and start digging through my glove box trying to find my registration before they make it to my driver's side window. I try to avoid reaching for anything in front of an armed officer who may or may not be nervous.
    If I have a 50% chance of guessing the right answer, I guess wrong 80% of the time.

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