Results 1 to 24 of 24
Like Tree5Likes
  • 1 Post By Dave H
  • 1 Post By Mick Bailey
  • 1 Post By Enzo
  • 2 Post By R.G.

Thread: What wire strippers?

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    471

    What wire strippers?

    What wire strippers do you guys like for close work, like inside a chassis. I have these6-1/2" Wire Strippers with Pressure Adjustment but they sometimes cut through the wire instead of stripping it.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    g1
    g1 is offline
    don't forget the joker g1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Canada, somewhere north of Fargo
    Posts
    8,323
    I had that style once and ended up smashing it to bits. They were just junk and you could not rely on the pressure adjustment or 'auto-sizing'.
    If you want an automatic style stripper, I'd suggest the type with the various sizes built into the head (klein 11063 for example). But for tight spots, I often find there is only room for the manual basic style stripper (stanley 84-214 for example).

    11063w.jpg

    7d8f1057-7588-44c0-bf07-2f927d81dbb1_1.a95e5d3e389d3a73170418ecf8d59f5c.jpeg
    Quote Originally Posted by Justin Thomas View Post
    In my ideal world, I'm not too loud - your room is too small!

  3. #3
    ToneOholic! big_teee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Mid-South USA
    Posts
    9,547
    Those look nice.
    I am a retired comm tech, I have several high dollars strippers, including ideal.
    I usually use the cheap GE strippers.
    https://www.amazon.com/GE-Stripper-S.../dp/B00135LG4A
    I also strip a lot of small wires with the ends of sharpened diagonal cutters, with the flat side out.
    A skill that takes time to develop, so I'm not recommending that one.
    T
    Technicians Run the World, but Bankers, Lawyers, and Accountants, Take All The Credit!
    Keep Rockin! B_T
    Terry

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    471
    I guess the basic manual style is the way to go. I have these too Heavy Duty Self-Adjusting Wire Stripper sometimes they strip all the way back to the clamping jaw, about 1/4 in. more than intended. CRAP!

  5. #5
    Senior Member Enzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Lansing, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    27,105
    I have no issue with many Harbor Freight tools, but their cheap strippers are just that.

    If your adjustable pressure stripper is cutting off the wire, reduce the pressure.

    I have used my Palasin stripper for four decades, and it is well worth the price. It is the same overall type as the one in post #1, but instead of one blade across, it is a row of tiny blades - looks like a row of staples in a stapler. WHen it clamps down on the wire, those individual blades shape around the copper conductor. Mine is straight on rather than the right angle like the post #1 unit. But they also make them in right angle type if that is your preference.

    Paladin Tools PA-1115P Mini-StripAx Wire Stripper, 32-18AWG
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

  6. #6
    g1
    g1 is offline
    don't forget the joker g1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Canada, somewhere north of Fargo
    Posts
    8,323
    Quote Originally Posted by dmartn149 View Post
    I guess the basic manual style is the way to go. I have these too Heavy Duty Self-Adjusting Wire Stripper sometimes they strip all the way back to the clamping jaw, about 1/4 in. more than intended. CRAP!
    That's the exact one I had. When it falls apart in your hand and you look at the actual mechanism and how it works, you will wonder how it even worked at all.
    The one Enzo posted is the real deal. The HF one is like a toy in comparison.
    The manual one never let's me down, if it does it's user error.
    Quote Originally Posted by Justin Thomas View Post
    In my ideal world, I'm not too loud - your room is too small!

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    471
    I can't bring myself to spend $100+ on strippers (there's a silly pole dancer joke in there somewhere) I'll get the simple manual style, Stanley or Visegrip not Harbor freight, though I still like and use some of their tools.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Enzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Lansing, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    27,105
    $100 are not for everybody, but I am a professional who earns his living with his tools. I use them a LOT, and they will strip anything from 12ga house wiring down to the tiny wires in a turntable tone arm. Small wires, I can strip two side by side at the same time if I want. If I have to strip the end of a multiwire cable, I can set the wire stop for llength of strip, and go down the row snip,snip,snip,snip. Faster than I could type that. All neatly stripped the exact same amount.

    What I can't afford is the $300 coax crimpers. I don't do enough of that work to justify it. But they do a fine job, are ratcheting so you cannot release them without completing the crimp.

    I also have a pair of the cheap GC hand strippers. The two flat blades riveted together kind. I have had them for 60 years, and I think I have a certain level of skill with them. You can set the depth screw, but no one ever does. I'd be adjusting it all day. But I developed the skill to detect the change in resistance as the blade cut through the insulation and hit copper. But for delicate wires, it is too easy to nick the conductor if not sever it. And if I were terminating the end of a snake cable, I'd have to make sure each wire was in the jaws the same depth, no way to automatically do that.

    wirestrippers.jpg
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

  9. #9
    Old Timer
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Cheshire, UK
    Posts
    1,454
    Quote Originally Posted by big_teee View Post
    I also strip a lot of small wires with the ends of sharpened diagonal cutters, with the flat side out.
    A skill that takes time to develop, so I'm not recommending that one.
    T
    I do that. My boss showed me the trick decades ago when I was starting out and I've been doing it ever since.
    big_teee likes this.

  10. #10
    Supporting Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    2,481
    A few years back I got a pair from a shop ($ store or whatever). I thought they were interesting junk. How wrong I was. They're my go-to strippers for most work and I use them day-in-day-out. They do struggle with PTFE, though. I have some German CK ones for heavy-duty stuff, but those little ones are great.

    Does anyone know if these are a knock-off of some US or European model?

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Am-Tech-2-W.../dp/B0058GIWL0

  11. #11
    ToneOholic! big_teee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Mid-South USA
    Posts
    9,547
    Quote Originally Posted by Mick Bailey View Post
    A few years back I got a pair from a shop ($ store or whatever). I thought they were interesting junk. How wrong I was. They're my go-to strippers for most work and I use them day-in-day-out. They do struggle with PTFE, though. I have some German CK ones for heavy-duty stuff, but those little ones are great.

    Does anyone know if these are a knock-off of some US or European model?

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Am-Tech-2-W.../dp/B0058GIWL0
    That link didn't work right on my US browser?
    Technicians Run the World, but Bankers, Lawyers, and Accountants, Take All The Credit!
    Keep Rockin! B_T
    Terry

  12. #12
    Supporting Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    2,481
    This is the one;

    wirestripper.jpg
    big_teee likes this.

  13. #13
    g1
    g1 is offline
    don't forget the joker g1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Canada, somewhere north of Fargo
    Posts
    8,323
    Quote Originally Posted by Mick Bailey View Post
    A few years back I got a pair from a shop ($ store or whatever). I thought they were interesting junk. How wrong I was. They're my go-to strippers for most work and I use them day-in-day-out. They do struggle with PTFE, though. I have some German CK ones for heavy-duty stuff, but those little ones are great.

    Does anyone know if these are a knock-off of some US or European model?

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Am-Tech-2-W.../dp/B0058GIWL0
    Klenk? Maybe not a knock-off but a re-label?
    https://klenk.everhard.com/products/...ter-strippers/
    Quote Originally Posted by Justin Thomas View Post
    In my ideal world, I'm not too loud - your room is too small!

  14. #14
    Supporting Member Steve A.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    3,702
    I have several high quality electrician wire strippers going down to maybe 20GA from Klein, et al, but the fine 22-28GA wires in multi-conductor cables is something else... I usually just heat the tiny wires up with a lighter and strip them with my fingernails but my nails are still very brittle from chemo last year (we all know about the effects of chemo drugs on hair but for playing guitar weakened nails are a much bigger problem!***)

    In any case I brought some multi-conductor cable to Harbor Freight to check out these strippers for $2.99 (less 20% for coupon.) They worked great but a quick look at the picture shows that you need a screwdriver to adjust the wire gauge. So I bought a second one (no discount ) and set one up for 22GA wire and one for 28GA wire. One complaint: the spring is WAY too stiff for fine gauge wire...



    https://www.harborfreight.com/5-inch...per-36901.html

    Steve A.

    P.S. Yeah, I have the ones from GC that Enzo mentioned but finding them is another matter as my tools are scattered among at least 2 dozen boxes as my attempts to organize them have been futile.

    P.P.S. I've used the automatic strippers from time to time — pretty cool if you need to strip a lot of wire with an insulation that is tough to strip manually but otherwise a pain...

    Attachment 43448

    *** I'd been using matte Nail Envy from OPI at the recommendation of a guitarist friend but just spent about $52 at Amazon for an LED light and some Gelish gel foundation and top coats.
    Last edited by Steve A.; 05-04-2017 at 04:46 PM.

  15. #15
    Senior Member Enzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Lansing, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    27,105
    The GC are pretty much the same thing as the Harbor Freight you linked.


    What I like about the Paladin is I don't have to line anything up. Some fancy ones have sized dies, so you have to line the wire up in the groove. The Paladin blade is not one blade, but a row of many tiny narrow blades, and they form around the wire conductor wherever it sits in the jaws.
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

  16. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Near Seattle, WA, USA
    Posts
    659
    Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
    ... You can set the depth screw, but no one ever does.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	WireStrippers.jpg 
Views:	20 
Size:	9.2 KB 
ID:	43252
    Nice to know I'm not unique in that - haha! My similar strippers actually have an offset thumbwheel depth adjust, but require a screwdriver so just stays set the same all the time. I think they came from Radio Shack several decades ago...

    Edit: Ahh - here they are - Xcelite 103's:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 103snv.jpg  
    Last edited by Mark Black; 05-04-2017 at 08:08 PM.

  17. #17
    Senior Member Enzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Lansing, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    27,105
    They work, and you can develop a high level of skill with them, a sense of feel cutting through the insulation. But once I got my pro tool, I never looked back.
    Mark Black likes this.
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    471
    I got these not super fast or fancy, but they work and don't give me any surprises.stripper.jpeg

  19. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    471
    I got these not super fast or fancy, but they work and don't give me any surprises.stripper.jpeg

  20. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Pace, FL
    Posts
    935
    Quote Originally Posted by dmartn149 View Post
    I got these not super fast or fancy, but they work and don't give me any surprises.Click image for larger version. 

Name:	stripper.jpeg 
Views:	12 
Size:	19.8 KB 
ID:	43457
    I got these in a bulk handtool buy. They look like a manual version of the Paladin strippers Enzo described. They're made by Facom photo-1.jpgphoto-2.jpg

    nosaj

  21. #21
    Supporting Member Chuck H's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    pacific north west
    Posts
    11,472
    I'm using the nut adjust type shown first in post #2 (yellow handle) and then post #8 (red handle). I always thought I was missing something, but I guess not. Pretty easy to snip off a strand or two of conductor if you're not careful. I actually use the nut adjustment when "building" an amp because I can adjust it for, say, 22ga. and stuff the board or adjust it for 18ga. and wire up the filaments. When I'm working on multiple gauges, for mods or voicing a build, I just leave it adjusted small and "feel" my way in. You can definitely feel when you reach the conductor. Then I just relieve the pressure a tad before I strip. On fine stranded lead with a bunch of filaments I can still get some copper in the strip. NBD, there's a bunch of them. On lower strand count lead I've gotten pretty good at keeping them whole. This as it applies to chassis work. For a bench stripper I've read here that the thermal type is the way to go. Still need to get and try one of those.
    "I've heard magic defined as "a technology you don't understand". By that aphorism, the folks in this forum are practicing wizards, able to summon AND control the lightning demon, and make charms to allow others to use the demon in certain ways." R.G.

    "...less ear-friendly but handy for jazz." Leo_Gnardo

  22. #22
    Lifetime Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    4,103
    If you ever use one of these:
    The PTS-10 Patco Inc wire strippers, thermal wire stripper, wire stripper cutter, wire cutter, cable stripper, coaxial cable stripper, wire stripping, cable stripping tool
    you'll never go back to what you used to do before.

    Heat up time is a few seconds. The wire is >> NEVER << nicked. The wire stop lets you get every wire stripped the same amount. The wire blade is hot enough to strip wires, but low enough thermal mass that it will not burn your fingers.

    I got mine for about $30 from ebay, used. But they're only $65-$80 new, over the counter.

    I repost this advice every time this question comes up on the assorted fora that I attend. Comes up about every year or so.

    Edit: I got curious and went off to ebay. There's a PTS-10 there for $44, free shipping now. Although the ad is a little wonky - a buyer would do well to pin the seller down to whether it works or not, from the repetition of "no returns".
    Last edited by R.G.; 05-14-2017 at 10:50 PM.
    Mark Black and Chuck H like this.
    Amazing!! Who would ever have guessed that someone who villified the evil rich people would begin happily accepting their millions in speaking fees!

    Oh, wait! That sounds familiar, somehow.

  23. #23
    Supporting Member Chuck H's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    pacific north west
    Posts
    11,472
    That looks pretty great. I bet there's be an issue stripping some jackets though. Like the faux cloth covered stuff, PTFE and silicone. I've used PTFE and silicone in builds that will be examined because my solder skills are mediocre and I hate jacket shrink. I've pretty much settled on irradiated PVC now because it performs really well compared to the plain stuff. Especially WRT shrink. I'd bet that stripping with heat would reduce shrink even further $80 (or even $44) is a jagged pill though when you already have a wire stripper. And that unit probably won't be next to the soldering supplies at Radio Shack or at the hardware store when you actually NEED a stripper. But I want one, I want one, I want one
    "I've heard magic defined as "a technology you don't understand". By that aphorism, the folks in this forum are practicing wizards, able to summon AND control the lightning demon, and make charms to allow others to use the demon in certain ways." R.G.

    "...less ear-friendly but handy for jazz." Leo_Gnardo

  24. #24
    Old Timer Tom Phillips's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    California, USA
    Posts
    3,252
    I bought one after learning about it on MEF a few years ago and it is the best tool I have for stripping Teflon wire,

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. American Wire Corp. Sandy Hook, Conn. Brown Plain Enamel wire ?
    By Electricdaveyboy in forum Pickup Makers
    Replies: 128
    Last Post: 10-19-2016, 05:35 AM
  2. Soldering 42 AWG plain enamel wire to the hookup wire
    By Mack Guitarworks in forum Pickup Makers
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 03-04-2016, 01:10 AM
  3. Replies: 10
    Last Post: 03-17-2013, 06:01 AM
  4. Replies: 26
    Last Post: 09-23-2011, 12:05 PM
  5. Wire and Strippers question.
    By mike_mccue in forum Music Electronics
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 09-12-2011, 05:34 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •