Results 1 to 5 of 5
Like Tree1Likes
  • 1 Post By Mick Bailey

Thread: Dinosaur brass-era guitars

  1. #1
    Supporting Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    2,837

    Dinosaur brass-era guitars

    I think it was the late 70s/early 80s when this stuff came out - brass everything for your guitar. Brass nuts, bridges, sustain blocks, scratchplates, knobs, pickup surrounds, screws, neck plates and everything/anything else. I just found a jack plug from that era. Insanely proportioned and will easily take an 8mm cable - Compare it with the regular Switchcraft plug with 6mm cable. Think of the weight of that plus a cable hanging off a socket.

    Trouble is your hands ended up smelling like you handle loose change all day in an amusement arcade for a living.

    You needed a good, solid walnut or mahogany body to show it all off. The heavier the better. Brass+weight=sustain was the idea.

    img_20170918_144816339.jpg
    g1 likes this.

  2. #2
    Old Timer olddawg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Carlsbad, CA and Kona, HI
    Posts
    2,350
    Quote Originally Posted by Mick Bailey View Post
    I think it was the late 70s/early 80s when this stuff came out - brass everything for your guitar. Brass nuts, bridges, sustain blocks, scratchplates, knobs, pickup surrounds, screws, neck plates and everything/anything else. I just found a jack plug from that era. Insanely proportioned and will easily take an 8mm cable - Compare it with the regular Switchcraft plug with 6mm cable. Think of the weight of that plus a cable hanging off a socket.

    Trouble is your hands ended up smelling like you handle loose change all day in an amusement arcade for a living.

    You needed a good, solid walnut or mahogany body to show it all off. The heavier the better. Brass+weight=sustain was the idea.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_20170918_144816339.jpg 
Views:	20 
Size:	1.95 MB 
ID:	44958
    I have one guitar with a brass nut. I really like it. It increases bite and sustain for open chords. But the setup has to be perfect. I like zero frets too if the headstock angle is right.

  3. #3
    Supporting Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    2,837
    I really like zero frets. I haven't had a guitar with a brass nut for a while. Both always struck me as being more consistent than having bone/plastic for open chords. Maybe this is where the brass craze took off - if a brass nut gives better sustain, then maybe replace everything else with brass. Was it Mighty Mite that set this going?

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    3,463
    I have been slowly, but surely preparing the collection of a friend who passed away a half-dozen years ago, for sale, on behalf of his widow.

    One of the instruments is a spotlessly clean Vantage from the Matsumoku factory, with the laminated body. The other is a similar model that I guess he had picked up dirt cheap because it was an absolute mess that someone had painted black and covered with stickers. I mention it here because the restoration of all that brass hardware - knobs, nut, bridge, etc. - that had corroded over the years was almost as hard as restoring the body.

    The brass craze was really one symptom of a broader craze that associated mass with sustain. Keep in mind that the brass thing occurred at the same time that the Ampeg/Armstrong Lucite-body guitar was being produced, and various infrequently-used ultra-dense tropical woods were being introduced. It was the period when Fender made the Rosewood Telecaster, which weighed a lot more (I know because I played one in the band I was in).

    Sidenote: The "Fathead" and Fatfinger products came somewhat later. These are/were brass inserts that add mass to the headstock, and would attach to the backside of the headstock, allowing the tuners to be re-installed over top. These products CAN improve sustain in some instances, but are no panacea, any more than a brass nut could do things for non-open strings. My advice for determining if such an addition could do anything for your instrument is to strum it, unplugged, then press the headstock against a door-frame to add effective mass to the headstock. If the sustain improves with the temporary added mass, then maybe a little more brass will yield some improvement.

  5. #5
    rjb
    rjb is offline
    Old Timer
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Somewhere near Bawlmer, Merlin
    Posts
    2,078
    I had a cable like that; picked it up probably '79 or '80. I'm pretty sure the brand was Whirlwind.
    WW's advertising hyped the robustness of their cables, compared to wimpy traditional guitar cords.
    Unfortunately, the cable was microphonic as hell. And as Mark noted, the brass contacts corroded in no time.
    Note: I thought the corrosion was due to use of dissimilar metals, but Wikipedia shows brass is slightly less dissimilar to lead or tin than is copper.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galvan...n#Anodic_index

    -rb

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. What era of wire d'ya think this is from?
    By fieldwrangler in forum Pickup Makers
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 10-09-2015, 08:20 PM
  2. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 06-10-2015, 08:15 PM
  3. Weak amplifier Dinosaur Bass Amp
    By samclemons in forum Music Electronics
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 02-01-2012, 02:30 AM
  4. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 04-28-2009, 05:54 PM
  5. Dinosaur PAF tone
    By EFK in forum Pickup Makers
    Replies: 40
    Last Post: 07-05-2008, 05:06 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •