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Thread: Fender SPL-6000 / Fan operation

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    Fender SPL-6000 / Fan operation

    Just bought a used Fender SPL-6000. Didn't check the fan operation when I picked it up. Set it up to retest and fan is not spinning. Manual says its a 2 speed fan, but does anyone know if it should be on continuously on low speed or is the fan activated / controlled by a heat sensor? Any help would be appreciated.
    Thanks

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    Quote Originally Posted by rahmajik View Post
    Just bought a used Fender SPL-6000. Didn't check the fan operation when I picked it up. Set it up to retest and fan is not spinning. Manual says its a 2 speed fan, but does anyone know if it should be on continuously on low speed or is the fan activated / controlled by a heat sensor? Any help would be appreciated.
    Thanks
    Looking at the schematic, the fan should turn on at low speed as soon as the power switch is turned on. When the heat sink for the power transistors hits 95 degrees, the fan should switch to high speed mode.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 52 Bill View Post
    Looking at the schematic, the fan should turn on at low speed as soon as the power switch is turned on. When the heat sink for the power transistors hits 95 degrees, the fan should switch to high speed mode.
    52 Bill, thanks for the quick response! So I guess I need to check the power feed to the fan to see if its getting any juice to determine if I have a fan or some type of power supply problem... :-( Bummer, can't even seem to find a parts list online for this old amp...
    Last edited by rahmajik; 10-24-2017 at 05:13 PM.

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    The fan is connected to the incoming line voltage. The slow speed is created by a 1000 ohm power resistor in series with the fan. Across the resistor is a thermal switch that bypasses the resistor when the temperature reaches the 95 degree point.

    Check the circuit by reading the resistance of the 1000 ohm resistor (amp unplugged). If it reads correctly, then the wiring or the fan itself is suspect.

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    Thanks again 52 Bill, I will check that out!

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    Old Timer J M Fahey's Avatar
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    *Sometimes* (not sure on that model but check anyway) thereīs two thermal switches, the idea being that a fan is not needed or uselessly sucks dust/lint all the time or noise is plain annoying, even at low speed (think Studio or bedroom use) so first switch is in series with everything, and turns on, at, say, 65C ; second one works as described above, in parallel with a series resistor and turns on at higher temperature.
    Personally get nervous above 85C but if they chose 95C, so be it.
    Juan Manuel Fahey

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    fenderspl6000fansection_schematic.jpg JM Fahey. Thanks. I've attached the fan section of the schematic. Interesting, now that you mention it, it does show a TS1 and TS2. TS1-248 F, TS2-194 F. Sorry guys, I'm not an electronics guy so not good at reading schematics....what do the #'s mean for each of the TS (Thermal Switch?), the F cannot mean Fahrenheit ???

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    Old Timer J M Fahey's Avatar
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    Ok, in your case, Ts2 controls the fan speed but it should always spin (unless stalled by hardened grease or dirt) but thereīs quite a few connectors in the path, so check itīs not open somewhere.
    Ts1 is an entire system thermal safety, if heatsinks get fully blocked (say, a pullover or jacket is carelessly thrown over the vents) then NO fan will blow through that.
    In that case whole amp is turned off, Ts1 is in series with main switch.
    Juan Manuel Fahey

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    Quote Originally Posted by rahmajik View Post
    what do the #'s mean for each of the TS (Thermal Switch?), the F cannot mean Fahrenheit ???
    Yes it is fahrenheit. The 194 F is about 90C.
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    Quote Originally Posted by g1 View Post
    Yes it is fahrenheit. The 194 F is about 90C.
    Sorry, missed the 1 on the drawing.

    TS probably stands for thermal switch or sensor, doesn't really matter as long as you know what it does. TS-1 is a normally closed switch that opens when it reaches 248 F and TS-2 is a normally open switch that closes when it reaches 194 F.

    The schematic is marked with "CP" points. These are connections on the pc board. They are usually printed right on the board next to the metal spade lug where you can plug on a wire. The 1K resistor will connect between CP4 and CP5, which is where the wires that go to TS-2 will be located.

    You can use an ohm meter to read the resistance between these two CP points or you can read directly across the resistor itself. The resistor may be fine, but if it has come unsoldered from the pc board, that will also prevent the fan from running. It may be best to read the resistance both ways terminal to terminal and across the resistor itself to test both possibilities.

    Not knowing your skill level, I am suggesting the simplest/safest tests to run to solve your problem.

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    Thanks again guys. My skill level in board level electronics is pretty low so thanks for the 'simple' tests. Wow, those fahrenheit temps just seem extremely high....I would have thought much more damage would happen before those temps are actually reached....anyway... I took the cover off, reseated the fan connections (where the fan wires connect via the spade lug to the board) and blew out the fan pretty good as well. The fan now starts up on power up :-) Seems to start fairly slow, then seems to reach 'normal' low speed operation in about 3 seconds. So I guess that tells me power to the fan is ok. Got the part #'s off the current fan so I might consider trying to find a replacement fan as a precaution.

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    Old Timer J M Fahey's Avatar
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    The fan starts lazy because itīs fed through a 1K dropping resistor.
    You would also wake up weak and dizzy if your blood sugar dropped under 70 during the night (donīt ask).

    Just as a health test, connect it straight to mains as if thermal switch were triggered ... I guess it starts like Hurricane Irma's little sister
    I mean momentarily bypass the resistor or thermal switch contacts.
    Juan Manuel Fahey

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    Measured the AC feeding the fan where the cable attaches to the lugs on the circuit board and measured around 50 volts AC. Is that how the multi-speed fan works? When it heats up to close the TS2 switch it would get a full 110 volt feed for high speed. Sometimes when it doesn't start, I give it a 'spin' and it starts up to the low speed. I've ordered a replacement fan unit as a precaution and to test.

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    Yes, reduced voltage = reduced speed. There may be oil points on the fan. Or if it has a paper label covering the center bearing, you might remove the label and directly oil the bearing.

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    Thanks, ill look for the oil points!

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    Ok, so one last question. I ordered a used fan and it didn't work at all Fan was very 'stiff' to spin by hand as compared to even the current fan. I tested the old fan using 110 volts and it spun right up to high speed no problem. These fans do NOT appear to have oil points. No rubber cap, has what seems to be a metal pressed on 'cap' that does not appear to be removable. (used fan I got made it look like someone had tried to pry up on the metal 'cap'....So the only issue with the current fan seems to be 'weakness' when it first gets the 50 volts. What I was considering doing was just go ahead and wire it up to 110 volts directly (bypassing the Thermal switch) so it always gets the 'juice' to get it spinning on startup (and we'd always know its on based on the sound at the higher speed). Thoughts? Hilarious that some of these electronics places have this same fan advertised for $150 and up, bwaaahhaaaa. I do find others that show up as reconditioned for $25. Thanks in advance.

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    Look on the center hub of the fan housing, not the rotor itself, but the frame. Is there not a round label stuck on there? It would say the brand and model number plus a few ratings like 120vAC and 14 watts or whatever. Peel that round label sticker off and see if there isn't the end of a shaft. A drop of oil there.

    SOme of them are stuck on in a small recessed area, but you should still be able to get under the edge of the label with a sharp pointed tool like an Xacto blade.
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

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    Sorry, there are no round stickers on the frame, only a rectangular sticker with the model #, part #, manufacturer, volts, etc. I removed it and there is nothing underneath it. The replacement fan looks exactly like it (same sticker, etc.). There is a small piece of metal on the side that protrudes out, but it has no holes, etc. and seems to be metal like the frame. I was looking at this youtube video when I was looking for the oil point on the rotor.....my mistake....https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hPyHBH3WwBM&t=12s. So I see nothing on the 'frame' that looks like it would be a place for oil.

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    What needs to be exposed is the shaft of the fan. I have never seen a fan I couldn't get to, but I certainly have not seen all the fans.
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

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    fanpic.jpg See this pic, this is the metal piece i was referring to when I said it didn't have a 'cap' to take off to get to the shaft (like in some of the video's I watched)....this is the 'frame' side. I referred to this earlier as the 'metal pressed on cap'.....just doesn't seem like it can be removed and this pic from the replacement fan looks like someone tried to 'pry' it off, but couldn't without damaging it.bentcover7.jpg
    Last edited by rahmajik; 11-03-2017 at 01:19 AM.

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    Yes, prying that off would bend it up, so we would just leave it off.

    If that is the dead fan, what is there to lose? Pry the thing off, and see what is there..


    Fans come in standard sizes, some imperial like 4 inch or 4.5 inch. others are metric like 80mm, 100mm, etc. Once you find the basic size, then look at depth, some are deeper than others. And of course it is either a 120vAC or 24vDC or 12vDC etc. A supplier like Mouser should have all those sizes and more at your voltage.
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

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    Thanks Enzo, the dead fan is the one I bought off ebay so I want to get my money back so I don't want to pry it off. The original still works if I give it a spin so don't want to mess with that one either. Thanks, I'll check the sizes off the spec sheets and check Mouser for a replacement. Thanks for all your help.

    Electrical Specifications
    Rated Voltage: 115 VAC
    AC Frequency: 60 Hz
    Power Supply: 11.0 Watts
    Line Current: 0.15 Amps
    Locked Rotor Current 0.22 Amps
    Nominal Speed: 3250 RPM
    Mechanical Specifications
    Dimensions: 3.15in x 1.65in
    Weight 18.0 oz
    Max Airflow @ 0 in H 2O 34.0 CFM
    Max Pressure @ 0 CFM 0.149 in H2O
    Noise 40.3 dBA

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    This one looks like the right size and all ratings except for RPM - 1500 (Original spec 3250)
    https://www.mouser.com/ProductDetail...KfUYj4QOMYc%3d

    This one is rated for 110 volts (Top one is rated for 115 volts) but shows 3100 RPM (Original spec 3250)
    https://www.mouser.com/ProductDetail...30k1WTzlTtU%3d

    Does the 110 volt spec matter?

  24. #24
    Senior Member Enzo's Avatar
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    110v 120v, all the same deal. they are intended for USA mains supply.

    The RPM is not the important factor, the CFM, cubic feet per minute, is how much air it moves.
    J M Fahey and rjb like this.
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    The second one I listed is 35.3 CFM, so I think the Mouser option is a safe bet vs trying to find a used one again. Thanks again everyone for your help!!!

  26. #26
    g1
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    That second one is listed as 100VAC, not 110.
    I don't think it's meant to be connected directly to mains AC.
    I think this is the 115V version:
    https://ca.mouser.com/ProductDetail/...XYPvOMZKrSA%3d
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    Thanks g1, I confirmed with Mouser!

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    I guess the 100V version is that used in the FAKE Ampegs, which are actually designed for use in Japan and blow to pieces when subject to macho man US mains ... at least that is the SGM opinion
    g1 likes this.
    Juan Manuel Fahey

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