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Thread: Super Reverb Repair Cost -- Give Us Your Quote

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    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    Super Reverb Repair Cost -- Give Us Your Quote

    On several occasions we've discussed the topic of what constitutes a fair rate for Amp repair. I've commented many times that many of us give our services away for far too cheap, compared to some of the commercial shops out there. to put this into perspective, I'd like to play a little game, called "Give Us Your Quote."

    Please tell us what you would charge to perform the following service on a Fender Super Reverb:

    * Replace all filter capacitors. Parts + labor. Use decent parts, no garbage.
    * Replace 4 bad preamp tubes (as if any amp ever needed 4 preamp tubes at the same time).
    * Replace screen grid resistors on the power tubes.
    * Fixed tremolo. Use your imagination. This would be a generic "tremolo repair" which could include anything but a bad driver tube, as the tubes were replaced in the second line item.

    Realistically speaking, fixing the tremolo circuit could only involve something basic, like fixing a bad footswitch/jack, replacing a bad bug, replacing a bad cathode bias cap, or some other part that would genuinely be prone to failure. No charging for complete rebuild of the trem circuit just because you're stupid.

    Break down your quote into a Labor charge, a parts charge and then give the a total charge. Once we have a bunch of good responses I'll post a bill of what one of the Chicago walk-in stores just charged someone. The answer might surprise you.

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    Labour in dollars or hours? I think hours may give a better comparison, assuming you know the rate at the Chicago shop in question.
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    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by g1 View Post
    Labour in dollars or hours? I think hours may give a better comparison, assuming you know the rate at the Chicago shop in question.
    I like to know hours x shop rate, but the invoice that I have for the shop is billed in dollars, without disclosing hours. I don't know the shop rate. So let us know your estimated clock time, your shop rate, and your total charge for labor. You don't have to match the Chicago shop rate, it's OK for there to be hourly rate variations from place to place. I think the results could be interesting either way.
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    Lifetime Member Enzo's Avatar
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    When I retired, I was charging $60/hr, and planning to go to $75. I am in Lansing, MI, and if I were in Manhattan, I'd expect labor to be at least twice that. HArd to imagine charging less and making a living.

    Five or six axial caps at $7.50 - $45
    Four preamp tubes at about $15-18 each - $75
    Two screen grid resistors at $1 - $2
    Caps for trem - $5.

    Inspect amp, find spooge on caps, replace all filters. Replace preamp tubes for whatever reason four were needed. Guy just wanted them, I guess. APparently new power tubes already in place, so replace cracked screen resistors on two sockets. Rebuild trem with all new caps, enlarge feedback caps to lower LFO freq range in the process. Chances are the resistors are OK. If the roach were bad, add $15 part.

    Clean any noisy controls or jacks, check pot and jack nuts for snug, check that power tubes are running at reasonable level or trim bias.

    I don't see much time spent troubleshooting, just straight parts overhaul. So two to two and a half hours labor - $150.

    ROughly $275.
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    Supporting Member The Dude's Avatar
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    My bill would be similar to Enzo's. Tubes would be slightly less by about 10 bucks and labor a bit less by about 20 bucks/ 2 hrs @ $65 (I'm in a smaller market). Otherwise, the same, so approx $245+tax. If I were writing an estimate, I'd bump it a bit in case of something unforeseen.

    I doubt it needed the preamp tubes. They probably just "looked old" and I'm betting they tossed perfectly good NOS tubes. There's a good chance the old tubes were better than the new ones.

    Edit: And if they need it "right now", it would be more.
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    I'm in the same camp as these guys, but let's go high.
    Maybe there was some ridiculous problem and extensive troubleshooting. I'd feel uncomfortable charging more than 3 hrs., especially since vintage Fenders are pretty much the easiest thing to work on. Most of us could probably do the actual 'parts replacement' and clean & check in an hour, if someone said "replace x parts".
    Now assume this is some shop of mojo repute, $100 per hr. at 3hrs. for $300.
    Mojo caps & tubes for $200
    Worst case scenario total of $500
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    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    Thanks everyone for your contributions so far.

    Just to clarify, this amp is supposed to be in good working condition with no oddball problems, and it's just being brought in for a tune-up and a tremolo fix. No extensive troubleshooting and time charges should be needed. This is just a straightforward re-cap/screen resistor swap, with some new preamp tubes, and fixing a broken tremolo. Don't worry about any other oddball problems or extensive diagnostics.

    It's great that some of you are willing to throw in free diagnostics, pot cleanings, re-biasing, etc., but the bill from the comparison shop DID NOT include any of that stuff. AFICT they never even bothered to bias the amp (!) they just did a blind cap job and screen resistor switch without mentioning bias adjustment, and shoved the amp out the door. That, and they fixed a malfunctioning tremolo but didn't say exactly what was wrong with it. Think of this as a simple job that doesn't require any complex diagnostics.

    Who's next? I'd really like to hear from some of you guys who do repairs in the City.
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    Supporting Member The Dude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bob p View Post
    ......It's great that some of you are willing to throw in free diagnostics, pot cleanings, re-biasing, etc......
    Nothing leaves my shop without the bias checked/adjusted. Pot cleanings? That's about 10 seconds of squirting and spinning. You're already in there. It'd be silly not to do it. I blow out the dust and give 'em a quick clean, too. IMO, that's just common sense stuff that doesn't take much time and makes the customer very happy.

    Edit: You have to wonder about the tremolo. Is it an experienced shop, or did it just take them a half hour to realize you had to short the trem footswitch jack to make it work?
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    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Dude View Post
    Nothing leaves my shop without the bias checked/adjusted. Pot cleanings? That's about 10 seconds of squirting and spinning. You're already in there. It'd be silly not to do it. I blow out the dust and give 'em a quick clean, too. IMO, that's just common sense stuff that doesn't take much time and makes the customer very happy.
    Kudos to you. I understand checking bias and cleaning pots is part of doing decent work, but remember, we're going to compare our informal survey with a big city amp shop's bill, where it looks like they charge for everything they write down, and nothing is given away for free. Everything is charged ala carte, and amp repair is a profit center for them.

    OK, maybe that's an exaggeration. I honestly don't know, I've never been to the shop. I just have a copy of their bill for reference. Maybe they are testing bias and cleaning pots without itemizing it. But IMO they should itemize everything that they're doing given the prices they charge. I don't want to be a spoiler of what's to come, but it looks like if the shop didn't itemize something on their bill then they didn't do it. I'm going to hold off on posting the bill until we get some more results.


    Edit: You have to wonder about the tremolo. Is it an experienced shop, or did it just take them a half hour to realize you had to short the trem footswitch jack to make it work?
    This shop promotes themselves as the premier place in the city. Hopefully they can diagnose a tremolo circuit in a few minutes once the chassis is open. And if they're charging for a complete cap job on the same ticket, then that should trivialize the work that goes into a trem fix -- check the control jack, check the oscillator output, check the driver output, check the bug, check the pulse waveform. With a scope any of us could isolate the malfunctioning stage in a matter of minutes. Extended diagnostics times only come from guys who don't know how to efficiently test a trem circuit.

    How about you Chicago locals? Let's hear from you! I'd also like to hear from somebody in NYC. Stokes, you reading this?
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    Lifetime Member Enzo's Avatar
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    I always do the basic maintenance, like Dude says, it only takes a minute. Likewise bias, it takes only a minute to check and set.

    I even take a bit of windex and a rag to the face, clean the finger dirt off the knob area. You hear with your eyes, and amp comes back looking just a bit sharper can;t hurt.

    I don't itemize those on a bill unless there is nothing else to show.

    I don't usually get an amp in where the customer says just replace these parts and fix nothing else but the trem. It doesn't take an hour to diagnose spooging e-caps in the dog house, I always look.

    When you say "free diagnosis" that conjures up an image in my mind of "free estimates". But when a repair is presented, the diagnosis is the first part of any repair. I have to know what the amp needs done to do any work.

    SO I don't perceive those things as extras.
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    I do recall seeing an invoice from a major repair shop that included units of solder, and that was back in the 90's.
    Recently I recall units of deoxit being charged by someone.
    So there are those things too, but I consider them something that should be built into the shop rate, same as tool use.
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    Supporting Member The Dude's Avatar
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    I don't normally bill out/worry about those sorts of things. On rare occasion there are enough missing screws, nuts, rubber feet, and other things of the sort that I will tack on a small charge for "misc. supplies", especially if I have to run to the hardware store to get things.
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    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    I think I've mentioned this before, the whole idea about charging for units of solder, spritzes of DeOxIt, and shop towels seems to have originated as the results of audits of the bigger shops by State sales tax auditors.

    I have a friend who runs a 6-bay automotive shop that is very busy. He was bitten by this in the 90s. He would buy his shop supplies from a distributor who would not charge sales tax on them, because he had a tax-exempt sales tax certificate on-file. He would use those consumable shop supplies on his jobs without itemizing them on the bills. A sales tax auditor realized that auto shops were buying supplies tax-exempt, and then consuming them in the shop without paying use tax on them. The shop then got audited for all of it's consumables purchases and got levied with a hefty penalty.

    Once the state figured out that this was a common practice they saw low hanging fruit waiting to be picked by auditing large auto shops. They proceeded to audit every high volume auto repair shop in the state, going back through 10 years of tax returns. The penalties and interest were huge.

    This had a windfall effect, in that it changed the way the accounting industry handled auto shops that use consumables. They changed their software, so that now every auto shop automatically gets prompted to enter a description for consumable shop supplies when the computer calculates the bill, and sales tax is charged to the customer so that the auto shop doesn't get bitten.

    Big electronics repair shops will itemize units of solder, deoxit and towels because they have accountants and accounting software doing their books. Those accounting firms learned from their auto industry mistakes. Little guys who work out of home and do their own books probably haven't been bitten... yet, but everyone remains at risk if they include these items in their shop rate without itemizing them. If you're lucky enough to get audited you might get bitten too.
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    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    After starting this thread I googled for standard cap repair prices. I found an interesting thread on The Gear Page. People there are talking about paying $800 just to have a Bassman re-capped. It seems that price quotes of $600-$800 are not all uncommon.

    WTF?

    TGP: What should it cost to re-cap a vintage fender?


    *Someone in the SF Bay area said that the cost for recapping with Ajax caps was $400. (Post 29)
    *Someone in Missouri paid $400-$600 to recap a Deluxe Reverb and put on a grounded power cord. (Post 35)
    * An amateur repair guy in the SF Bay area said he wouldn't do a re-cap for less than $250 because it was a time consuming job (Post 52)
    * Skip Simmons in Northern CA reportedly charges $800 to recap a Bassman (Post 62)
    * David Allen (Allenamps.com) is an EE in Kentucky. He charges $100 + $60 shipping.


    PT Barnum's prices didn't get mentioned, though PT may be alive and well, but operating under a different name in that thread.

    I'd really like to hear form you guys on the East and West coasts.
    Last edited by bob p; 12-15-2017 at 06:29 PM. Reason: edit: Allen is in KY not OH
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    Supporting Member Jazz P Bass's Avatar
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    WTH!

    https://www.thegearpage.net/board/in...#post-23433561

    NOS Ajax blue molded capacitors: "The Ajax caps were $30 each".

    A fool & his money........
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    I would typically charge $100-150 labor to go through some amp and recap it and fix it up.

    I am a sucker I suppose because I just recapped a blackface Fender showman amp and the bill came out to be $169.

    Caps were F&T for PS and bias supply and Sprague caps for preamp. 1 preamp tube was noisey and needed to be replaced. Tremolo ticked but was fixed by adjusting lead dress to that tube socket.

    So I charged $110 labor and rest was caps and a preamp tube.
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    I have a less than shops price because I am essentially a vigilante against the local spots. However I have a more normal price for shops taht ask me to do work

    I charge shops more than my price for my customers because I appreciate the work but I believe they should be handling their own workload and not trying to have me fix their gear so they can look good (both in difficulty of repair and also they are essentially asking me to bail them out on their long turn around time)

    Edit: I think of my time as $50/hr. if a shop charges $90-100 per hour but asks me to do their repairs I will proably charge them about $75/hr

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    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    Short version: $250 all in.

    Long version:

    I'm only going to talk about working Fender amps that haven't been modded. If I get a stock Fender amp that works and is coming for a simple PM job and a trem fix, and it doesn't need bench time diagnostics for some oddball problem then I'll quote a flat rate price. Customers seem to like knowing what the total cost will be up front. Every job that I do involves checkout, rebias, and resistive load testing when I'm done. I won't clean the outside of amps that aren't already clean. Some guys think dirt is mojo. If the amp has been modded and I have to deal with someone else's cooking then the flat rate option isn't offered.

    Fix a busted tremolo on an otherwise working amp? $150 will get the amp a basic amp checkout and a trem fix no matter what's wrong with the tremolo. Replacing the stompswitch? Free. Fixing a jack? Free. New cable? Free. Needs a new tube or a bug? Free. No ala carte markups. Whatever is wrong gets fixed for the flat rate.

    Shotgun Electrolytic Recap? $150 parts and labor. I use F&T or Sprague and I won't use Illinois. Free screen resistors included as PM. Cost could be higher if somebody demands boutique caps.

    About $50 of any of my flat rate fees goes toward the basic bench exam, so if I get a request for both a recap and a Trem on the same job I'll knock off $50 off of the second ala carte price since the amp is already going to be open for diagnostics.

    So based on the flat rate concept, I'd charge $150 for the cap job, $150 for the Trem job, and give back $50 for doing both at the same time. So the base charge would be $250 including all parts and labor. That includes a free preamp tube if needed for the trem circuit.

    I won't pull somebody's working preamp tubes and con them into buying new tubes. But if somebody demands new tubes I'll sell them 3 for $60 after tax. In the comparison bill from the Chicago premium store we're talking about 4 tubes, but since I'm giving one away in the trem job I'd only have to add on 3.

    I really think my price would be $250 with no more than 1 tube being replaced. But if I had to pad the bill with 3 more unnecessary tubes to match the other store's ticket, then add $60 and call my final bill $310 out the door. The truth is that I'd never do that, and my real charge would be $250.


    I've found that customers really like flat rate pricing. With flat rate pricing people know what they're getting into up front and it makes it easy for them to decide whether or not to pump money into an amp if they know what the final bill will be before they start. With flat rate pricing they also know that they won't be surprised by the final bill when some unscrupulous guy tries to jack the price on them.
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    g1
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    Quote Originally Posted by bob p View Post
    Short version: $250 all in.
    No, $310 out the door.
    Do you want a valid comparison or do you want to play 'trick question'?
    I don't think any of us thought those tubes were an option, I certainly did not. Did you think we were also 'conning the customer into buying new tubes'? That is offensive.
    On a more philosophical note, I can't believe you would try to curtail the customers freedom like that.

    If you want to go hypothetical, how about this? Turns out the amp had been recapped in 2012 and someone told him it needed to be done every 5 years. So zero for the recap. No tubes required as his NOS ones were as good or better than anything that can be bought today.
    Tremolo was a bad solder connection, replaced screen resistors.
    $2 parts, min. labour charge of $35.
    So total of just under $30 US.
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    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    I understand where you're coming from. It sounds like we'd all charge the same $20 or so for preamp tubes. I would have charged $250 for a flate rate repair, but if I have to force 3 extra tubes on a customer who doesn't need them to match what the other store does then my price would be $310. But I think it's safe to say that most of us couldn't imagine a scenario where the guy would actually need 4 new preamp tubes. So call it $310. When you see the price that the local shop charged, the difference between $250 and $310 won't seem important.

    On a philosophical note, I'm not curtailing anyone's freedom -- the customer can go anywhere he wants to go if he doesn't want the flat rate price that I offer. It's a free market.

    Regarding the hypothetical, if your total comes in at US $30 then you're really going to shit when you see what the local store charged.

    When I see bills like this one, I'm glad that there are vigilantes in Chicago like nsubulysses who are trying to keep the prices down.

    Here's the Bill:

    Labor: $360
    Parts: $255
    Total: $615



    The poor guy who had this amp fixed is trying to sell it for $900 now.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails guitar-third-coast-invoice.jpg  
    Last edited by bob p; 12-16-2017 at 02:27 AM.
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    Yikes. I guess being on the coast and all...
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    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    And the streets are paved with gold, along with their driveway that they are trying to pay off?
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    Old Timer J M Fahey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bob p View Post
    After starting this thread I googled for standard cap repair prices. I found an interesting thread on The Gear Page. People there are talking about paying $800 just to have a Bassman re-capped. It seems that price quotes of $600-$800 are not all uncommon.

    WTF?

    TGP: What should it cost to re-cap a vintage fender?


    *Someone in the SF Bay area said that the cost for recapping with Ajax caps was $400. (Post 29)
    *Someone in Missouri paid $400-$600 to recap a Deluxe Reverb and put on a grounded power cord. (Post 35)
    * An amateur repair guy in the SF Bay area said he wouldn't do a re-cap for less than $250 because it was a time consuming job (Post 52)
    * Skip Simmons in Northern CA reportedly charges $800 to recap a Bassman (Post 62)
    * David Allen (Allenamps.com) is an EE in Kentucky. He charges $100 + $60 shipping.
    So let's see: the Electronic Engineer who is supposedly the most qualified charges $100 and the tyros/self_appointed_Gurus/snake_oil_salesmen charge $250 to $800?
    Well, customers paying exhorbitant prices, presumably with some poor soldering thrown in for free, DESERVE it.
    Darwin at its best.
    I don´t feel sorry for them at all.
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    Quote Originally Posted by J M Fahey View Post
    So let's see: the Electronic Engineer who is supposedly the most qualified charges $100 and the tyros/self_appointed_Gurus/snake_oil_salesmen charge $250 to $800?
    There are now (across various forums) a lot of guys doing 'repairs' and paint by number style builds for big bucks. Their first response to any quality type complaints for repairs is usually 'needs a recap'.
    Beyond that, or to troubleshoot their builds, they come to places like this forum.
    And they prefer if you answer with a layout, rather than a schematic.
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    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    The estimates from TGP were just obscene. $800 for a cap job using genuine 50 year-old NOS caps? Oh, please!

    Notice that the DIY guy with no training thinks that a cap job is a major repair because it would take a lot of time for him, so much time that he'd want to charge $250. Compare that to guys who know what they are doing will knock that job out in an hour or less for $100.

    What bugs me about the Third Cost Guitar Repair invoice is that it's not clear how many shop hours they billed for, or what their shop rate is. They just gave a labor cost of $360. I tried going to their website to see if I could find out what their shop rate was. No dice.

    https://www.thirdcoastguitar.com/amp-repair/

    Assuming that they have a shop rate of around $100/hour, that means that it took them 3:40:00 to fix the amp, which also seems like an unreasonably long time to do a simple re-cap and fix a tremolo circuit. Maybe it took their guy a long time to fix the tremolo because he doesn't know what he's doing, but he's happily charging $100/hour to fumble along?

    Any Fender tech who knows an oscilloscope from a hole in the ground should be able to diagnose a dead trem circuit on an AB763 in a matter of minutes -- a waveform trace at the oscillator, a waveform trace at the bug driver, a waveform trace at the wiper at the intensity pot and you know where the problem lies.

    Then there's the parts charge of $255. Anyone can order a Fender re-cap kit with German F&T caps from Antique Electronic Supply for $25 at retail:

    https://www.tubesandmore.com/product...763-black-face

    JJ Preamp tubes cost $10 each:

    https://www.tubesandmore.com/product...jj-electronics

    MOx Screen Resistors cost $3 for the pair:

    https://www.tubesandmore.com/product...DMetal%20Oxide

    Add $10 for shipping and the total cost for a small-volume retail order is now $78.00. It looks like the local shop tripled the cost of buying those parts a la carte at retail and having them shipped. Of course, if they buy in bulk like most shops, their parts cost would be dramatically cheaper, and the amount that they charged for parts would seem even more obscene.

    Wow. Just Wow.

    They're either charging way too much, or those of us who came in at $250-$310 are charging way too little. It gets even worse if any of us would balk at the idea of putting 4 preamp tubes on the bill. Then the price difference is bigger by another $60 to $80.
    Last edited by bob p; 12-16-2017 at 03:30 AM.
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    Two Words: HOLY $#!+ !!!

    What parts and tubes was he using? Four tubes, $80 max. Filter caps? $60 for F&T.
    I'd be demanding to know what caps and tubes they used, and what exactly "fixed tremolo" means... And how many hours of labor, exactly? Using $90/hr., four hours?

    This is why I got into fixing my own amps. I tried to do the channel switch pop mod on my Prosonic, and put one end of the resistor on the wrong terminal, and now something didn't work. I forget what. Anyway, $150 later for ONE RESISTOR, that I TOLD him was wrong, and I was soured for life. He didn't even have to troubleshoot the amp.

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    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    "Fixed Tremolo" really bothers me. When I see something nebulous like that, it makes me wonder if some of the repair cost isn't hiding there. That is why I like to give people flat-rate guarantees. Everyone knows that there's no monkey-business that way.

    I think 4 hours at $90 is probably a good guess. That's way too much time, IMO.

    I feel sorry for the poor guy who took in his SR and paid $615 to have it fixed, and is now trying to sell it for $900. Doing the math, it's as if his amp had a fair market value of no more than $285 going into the shop.

    Seems like they're really proud of their work, based on the prices they charge.
    Last edited by bob p; 12-16-2017 at 09:39 PM.
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  29. #29
    Lifetime Member Enzo's Avatar
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    Were I to receive a bill like that, I wouldn't hesitate to ask for a breakdown. What was the hourly rate and what were the individual parts costs.
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

  30. #30
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    I have so much inside information on all of this
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  31. #31
    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    don't keep us in suspense. is this a case where you fixed the amp for $300 and they charged the guy $615 for your work?
    "Stand back, I'm holding a calculator." - chinrest

  32. #32
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    no wonder you told me to join the thread,you want the juicy tidbits! Sorry maybe I was being a bit too thrilling with my response. I was gonna edit my post I don't have all the inside info. In fact, my mind is continually blown by shop prices so maybe I'm even quite out of the loop.

    ANyway, I checked my invoices and thankfully that one didn't come up. I don't remember a super reverb anyway. I usually get more like, hmmmm, line 6 combo, new marshall amp that is less than a year old and doesn't work, Fender DSP, some 500W bass amp that fits in a laptop case, lots of Ampeg BA115, ummm, some DJ mixing console that has an ipod dock, you know, the junk

    I've seen $300-400 bills for fixing crappy Fender Hot Rod series that break twice per year no matter what you do to them. Not sure what the point is. But I guess it pays the bills. there's a juicy one for ya!

  33. #33
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    Also people that work at real establishments that have cash flow (overpriced?) have decent salaries and health insurance and stuff. Kind of an upside to the high life.

    A photographer friend once told me that you shouldn't come in and undercut people just because you're inexperienced or starving for work because when people come in and undercut the industry they degrade the wage of the profession in general.

    Not sure how this all plays out but I just added $25 labor to an invoice I'm working on now after reading this thread
    J M Fahey and g1 like this.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Justin Thomas View Post
    Two Words: HOLY $#!+ !!!

    What parts and tubes was he using? Four tubes, $80 max. Filter caps? $60 for F&T.
    I'd be demanding to know what caps and tubes they used, and what exactly "fixed tremolo" means... And how many hours of labor, exactly? Using $90/hr., four hours?
    JJ 6L6GC, almost the cheapest power tube available, is $63.20 for a quad at wholesale pricing. Add in $8-15 shipping and the quad cost $71-78 per quad. if you have a 30% parts mark up on $63.20 (normal or modest) that's $82.16. So you might make $4-10 per quad. That won't even buy my lunch for 1 day. when doing a $500-1000 parts order you are fronting money for 5 or 10 peoples parts. Parts inventory HAS to make money for you because you are constantly fronting money so peoples gear can be fixed. I have a very small business compared to most but it's typical for me to be owed $500-2000 at all times from fixed amps waiting to be picked up.

    Sometimes I order many parts for many people and the parts markup works good. Sometimes a customer wants or needs their amp by the weekend for tour, recording, show, etc, so I order them a quad of tubes to help them out. It's not part of my pooled parts orders. I make nearly nothing on that parts order but I'm helping someone out, and they appreciate it, and they spread the word.

    Anyway, I'd think $80 for a quad of power tubes is a GREAT price if you're a poor bum like me or just a DIYer because it's basically cost. JJ 6L6GC quad at retail is $70 plus shipping. I would bet the shop charged $100-120 for the quad. The parts is not the problem here. It's that they took this poor sucker to the bank on the labor cost on a totally easy repair. But it seems like that's how it is for some shops. They BANK on easy, vintage tube amp repairs and often times try not to work on much else. (I will vouch for 3rd coast and say though that they will work on pretty much anything which I find admirable. There are other shops in town that literally only work on vintage tube amps for an exorbitant price)

    ........And if you look closely you can see who the tech is on the invoice.
    Last edited by nsubulysses; 12-16-2017 at 07:48 PM.

  35. #35
    Lifetime Member Enzo's Avatar
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    I think if we re-read the thread, we will find the four tubes were specified as preamp tubes. So $80 for a quad of 12AX7, not 6L6.

    Super Reverb only has two 6L6 anyway.



    That tech signature is scary. It looks like it says...SGM.
    bob p, Justin Thomas, g1 and 1 others like this.
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