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  1. #106
    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave H View Post
    At the wanna be public school (grammar school) I went to it was used as a punishment. When you were in detention they would make you copy out verses of the bible for hours until your hand was dropping off. It's enough to put you off it for life.
    I think that's a pretty good example of state-sponsored indoctrination in atheism.
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  2. #107
    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    I miss real root beer. Used to be Hires was real, Frosty was real. Now they are all artificial like Fanta. If I recall it was something about the original root flavoring that could be carcinogenic. Used to get a cold Frosty on the store bus.
    When I was a kid, we used to visit a property that was full of sassafras trees. We used to harvest and make our own root beer. I still have memories of that aromatic fragrance that permeated the house.

    Fast forward a few decades and you can't buy real root beer any more, and you can't even buy the ingredients to make real root beer. By law you're only allowed to buy root beer that's made with artificial flavorings. There are two reasons that real root bear doesn't exist any more, and that today's root bear doesn't use natural flavorings. You can choose which reason you'd rather believe:

    Real root bear flavoring is derived from the sassafras fruit. Back in the 1960s it's primary ingredient, safrole, was banned because it it was thought to be carcinogenic, though the proof if it's carcinogenicity is still under debate.

    Another reason that you can't buy real root beer that has safrole in it is because safrole has been banned internationally, according to the terms of the UN Convention Against Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances. Why? Because the root beer essence safrole is one of many chemicals that can be used as a precursor in the synthesis of 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine, commonly known as Ecstasy. Current government regulations worldwide not only ban the drugs, but also highly regulate the chemicals that can be used to make them.

    As a result of it's ability to be used as a precursor to the organic synthesis of MDMA the US DEA keeps natural root beer flavoring on the list of controlled List 1 Chemicals. Anyone who acts as a supplier of any chemical on the list is subject to rigid regulation and control measures. As a consumer, you can't buy it. Just like you can't more than an ounce of Lugol's Iodine solution any more because it can be used in the synthesis of methamphetamine.


    So while one group of people believes that the FDA had banned safrole in the interest of public health, there's another group of medicinal chemists and toxicologists that know that the entire world has regulated safrole, in the name of public health, or as others will call it, The War on Drugs.
    Last edited by bob p; 04-11-2018 at 10:36 PM.
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    "Stand back, I'm holding a calculator." - chinrest

    "I happen to have an original 1955 Stratocaster! The neck and body have been replaced with top quality Warmoth parts, I upgraded the hardware and put in custom, hand wound pickups. It's fabulous. There's nothing like that vintage tone or owning an original." - Chuck H

  3. #108
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    My wife works as a safety evaluator in the Food Safety branch of the Canadian equivalent of the FDA. Her unit specializes in additives and changes to commercial products. These days she's working on a particular preparation of stevia. Never ceases to amaze me the things she learns about food additives that we only know from a simple word on the label, separated by a comma in the list of ingredients, and think of in complete isolation, but she knows about the method of preparation or extraction, and how it poses this risk at such and such a temperature or when combined with such and such an ingredient.
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  4. #109
    Lifetime Member Enzo's Avatar
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    My aunt used to make terrific root beer. Real stuff made with yeast. It did ferment and took on some alcohol. But the yeast kept growing, so if you didn't open them and drink them pretty soon, they would burst.
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

  5. #110
    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    My dad also used to make wine in small batches as hobby. I remember him having barrels with bubbler airlock valves on top of them to let the gas out while they were fermenting. I used to stand there and watch the bubble valves fill up with air and then burp, letting the CO2 out. To a young kid that gas coming out of nowhere was like magic. I thought it was fascinating.
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    "Stand back, I'm holding a calculator." - chinrest

    "I happen to have an original 1955 Stratocaster! The neck and body have been replaced with top quality Warmoth parts, I upgraded the hardware and put in custom, hand wound pickups. It's fabulous. There's nothing like that vintage tone or owning an original." - Chuck H

  6. #111
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    Baking soda-powered scuba divers and submarines, found as prizes in boxes of Rice Crispies.

    Did any of you ever send away for some special offer requiring some number of boxtops, or anything sold on the back of a comic book?

  7. #112
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  8. #113
    Old Timer Leo_Gnardo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Hammer View Post
    Did any of you ever send away for some special offer requiring some number of boxtops, or anything sold on the back of a comic book?
    No I did not receive my Junior Birdman of America wings after sending in two box tops and one thin dime. I bought it at a garage sale. For a nickel! So take that.... Well it was stolen, at a gig nearly 40 years ago, and I'm still p.o.'d!

    Did anyone ever buy the onion gum?

  9. #114
    Lifetime Member Enzo's Avatar
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    Baking soda submarines and divers...YEAH!.

    I have sent away with box tops and such. I got decoder rings from a couple places. The Space Patrol show was sponsored by Purina. They made up a full size space ship and it toured the country. If you brought a box top, you could go inside it, flip switches, turn the steering wheel, and look at blinking lights. Eventually they gave it away as a prize.

    https://johneaves.wordpress.com/2009...t-a-lucky-kid/

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    I got to enter the ship by the Safeway store in Wheaton MD. Oh it was a gloorious day.
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

  10. #115
    Old Timer Tom Phillips's Avatar
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    The Oscar Meyer Weiner Car. Saw it once parked at the factory in Wisconson and once driving on Interstate 5 in California.

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    I stumbled upon the Oscar Meyer Weinermobile in a parking garage in Toronto about 25 years ago. There was a pack of smokes on the dash and maps and assorted other debris spread around. It was funny to see this iconic thing up close, looking so lived-in and ordinary inside. It must have been on a tour, just stopped for the night.

  12. #117
    Supporting Member Chuck H's Avatar
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    I remember pizza use to be a special treat. We only had it a few times a year. If a parent said pizza around kids it was palms up, raising the roof! Now it's so common that kids today only give an ambivalent "Uh... Ok." Same with doughnuts. As a kid doughnuts weren't an 'anytime' sort of event. I remember seeing pizza on the lunch menu at school and thinking "YES!" Of course it was lousy, but it WAS pizza and we liked it. I think, maybe, my generation grew up with such an affinity for the magic of pizza that it proliferated an unnatural imbalance of pizzerias which just sucked the special right out of it.
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  13. #118
    Lifetime Member Enzo's Avatar
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    Yep, pizza was not everyday fare.

    There were two kinds of donuts. Once in a while we got real ones, like from a donut store. These were not donuts, these were doughnuts. The other ones were the ones mom got at the store. They were the tiny little donuts that were either caked with white powdered sugar or dipped in chocolate. Or a box of six full size donuts likewise caked.

    I like a good donut, but am not a fan of Krispy Kreme. To me those are all air puffed.

    Across the street from the train station was Giffords Ice Cream store. It was a tradition in those parts. Old fashioned ice crream, good stuff. You wanted a pint or quart or whatever, they hand packed it for you. This was the 1950s, so the coolers were all the old enamel with inset windows - think the meat counter in a film of old USSR. You had a selection of flavors of course. But what always caught my eye was the ice cream cakes. SOme had actual cake, but most were all ice cream that looked like cake.

    There were the rolls. You start with a thin layer of chocolate cake, then a layer of ice cream then roll it up into a cylinder. Slicing created spiral discs. Sometimes layers of ice cream were rolled up. Sometimes blocks of ice cream were laid down like layer cakes. And of course all were decoratively iced. Oh how I longed for one of those, but mom only ever bought packed ice cream. Mom always got normal flavors like choc/van/straw or butter pecan. But once in a while she'd also get a half pint of coffee flavor ice cream. I really liked that, but it was her special treat and I was lucky to get a taste.

    Giffords also made hand wrapped caramels, in light and dark. Very yummy. If grandma came to town, we always had to make a trip over to Giffords. Especially since it was across from the train station she'd arrive at.


    I remember my first bike, 1952 maybe. It was red. It was smaller, I forget, maybe 20" tires? SImple, you pedal to go, and push the pedals backwards to brake. It had training wheels clamped on the back. The cool bikes we called "English Racers". That is the bike with gears, had a gear lever on the handlebars. THREE SPEEDS!!! The tires were larger, like 26 inch maybe, but were very narrow, not like my little bike with fat tires. I got my English Racer for Xmas eventually. I remember when it was time to pull the training wheels off. And like most kids of that era, I used a clothespin to stick a baseball card in my spokes for sound.
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

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