Page 8 of 8 FirstFirst ... 2345678
Results 246 to 263 of 263
Like Tree19Likes

Thread: Low Impedance Pickup Research

  1. #246
    Junior Member KhzDonut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    14
    Hello, new to the forum, but I've been reading this thread with much amazement and interest for the last week or so (took quite awhile to get through the whole thing!) as well as some over at Talkbass (specifically this one Low impedance, Low noise pickups Research. What's the Skinny? | TalkBass.com)

    I've started making some prototypes using many of the design ideas and parts (CSE187L, Calrad 45-715, etc...)

    Just wanted to say thanks so much to everyone, especially Mr. Rogowski for all the information. The thoroughness and open-sourceness of this thread is really intriguing and inspiring. It makes it really easy to get involved, and that's making it easy to get excited about the whole endeavor.


    Thanks so much for the excellent read!
    Last edited by KhzDonut; 06-12-2015 at 05:25 AM.
    Will Tune To 24.5hz For Food
    KhzDonut on YouTube

  2. #247
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    44

    Popsicle Pickup

    I made a simple pickup to fit my modified baritone guitar (tuned it in fifths, and adjusted it accordingly).
    My wife made me promise that it would be a "non-destructive" pickup, so no drilling allowed.

    I came up with this:



    I sandwiched two 25x5x3mm strong magnets between two popsicle sticks. I made a single loop around the magnets using some electric wire which I had lying around, keeping it in place with two tie wraps. I coupled the single loop with a 1:500 current transformer (Talema AS-104). Finally I soldered a microphone cable to the transformer.
    The result is a low Z pickup with a balanced output suitable for a microphone input.
    The distance between the two sticks is just a bit wider than the thickness of the top, with the use of two screws the pickup is clamped in the soundhole.

    I've made two short soundclips, one with only a wee bit of reverb, and a second one with the highs rolled off around 2kHz.

    I'm still pondering over a better way to retain the cable (besides using black tape instead of grey )

    Merry Christmas!

    Hans
    copperheadroads likes this.

  3. #248
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Barnegat,NJ
    Posts
    510
    Quote Originally Posted by MisterBzr View Post
    I made a simple pickup to fit my modified baritone guitar (tuned it in fifths, and adjusted it accordingly).
    My wife made me promise that it would be a "non-destructive" pickup, so no drilling allowed.

    I came up with this:



    I sandwiched two 25x5x3mm strong magnets between two popsicle sticks. I made a single loop around the magnets using some electric wire which I had lying around, keeping it in place with two tie wraps. I coupled the single loop with a 1:500 current transformer (Talema AS-104). Finally I soldered a microphone cable to the transformer.
    The result is a low Z pickup with a balanced output suitable for a microphone input.
    The distance between the two sticks is just a bit wider than the thickness of the top, with the use of two screws the pickup is clamped in the soundhole.

    I've made two short soundclips, one with only a wee bit of reverb, and a second one with the highs rolled off around 2kHz.

    I'm still pondering over a better way to retain the cable (besides using black tape instead of grey )

    Merry Christmas!

    Hans
    Hans and anyone tinkering with this type of pickup

    Here are some things to try that will help improve your design.

    1. When using a toroid current transformer (CT) try to fill the opening with the largest wire that will snugly fit into the opening. This will minimize any potential microphonics caused by the string loop wire and transformer from vibrating against each other.

    2. The output impedance of the CT is determined by the DCR of the string loop which also included the resistance of the wire connection making the loop or connecting to a pre-installed CT primary turn (as in using the CSE-187L). Obtain some copper tubing with an inside diameter near the outside diameter of the chosen wire. Join the string loop wire together with about 6 mm length of copper tubing (typically a length twice the diameter of the chosen wire). Clean the inside of the tubing with fine sandpaper, insert the wire, crimp if the wire is not snugly set and the solder using silver solder. Copper tubing a little too small to fit the wire can be expanded by using the tapered shaft of a nail set (or similar tool) to slightly expand the tubing to snugly fit the wire.

    3. Ground the string loop at the joint to the XLR connector pin 1, ground to minimize the noise. If using a CSE-187L CT then also ground the metal frame of the transformer.

    The output impedance using a 500 turn CT can be easily calculated by looking up the resistance of the chosen wire per inch and then multiply that value by the chosen length of wire. AWG 11 is 105 micro-ohms per inch, thus a 7 inch length through a toroid CT will be 105 X 7 or 735 micro-ohms. Multiply this value by the turns ratio squared or in this case 250,000. Since 250,000 is one fourth or 1 million simply divide 735 by 4 and get about 184 ohms. Add about 17 ohms for leakage inductance and you get 201 ohms. This is well below the maximum impedance of about 300 ohms that will work into an XLR mic input. If you choose to use a 1000 turn CT you will need to use a thicker string loop wire that will fill the toroid opening, as the output impedance will be about 4 times higher if using the same size wire a previously noted. Use a wire table to obtain the resistance of the chosen wire to do this calculation.

    Here is a little trick that will help you mount the pickup lead wire more easily. Wrap a piece of bungi cord (stretchy rubber cord) abound the heel of the neck, up toward the head and bend down under the heel of the neck and make tight. Attach about a 1 foot length of 2 conductor shielded mic wire to the pickup and the other end to a stereo miniature female in line connector. Secure this in line connector to the bungi cord right after the bungi cord bends down 90 degrees from the guitar top on the upper side of the neck. Make a custom male stereo plug and wire length to an XLR connector to allow you to easily attach the pickup to the amp with no modifications to your guitar.

    You will find that you can add extra parallel wire turns to fill the toroid opening space. Each wire should be soldered to itself to form a string loop and then grounded with the other grounds to keep the noise very low. Each additional added wire will lower the total string loop resistance and lower the output impedance. Lowering the string loop resistance also has the effect of shaping the voicing of the pickup to favor lower frequencies.

    This CT pickup design provides a wide variety in the ways that can be adapted to an acoustic or even electric guitars as you have demonstrated in your creative work.

    Happy Holidays!

    Joseph J. Rogowski
    Last edited by bbsailor; 12-28-2015 at 07:27 PM.

  4. #249
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    44
    Thanks Joseph

    I've made a sideview shot, to get a better view of how it is build.



    I've indeed grounded the single loop.

    Hans

  5. #250
    rjb
    rjb is offline
    Old Timer
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Somewhere near Bawlmer, Merlin
    Posts
    1,943
    Quote Originally Posted by MisterBzr View Post
    I made a simple pickup to fit my modified baritone guitar (tuned it in fifths, and adjusted it accordingly).
    My wife made me promise that it would be a "non-destructive" pickup, so no drilling allowed....

    I'm still pondering over a better way to retain the cable (besides using black tape instead of grey )
    For a more permanent installation, you could use a 1/4" stereo endpin jack instead of the bungi cord arrangement.
    You would need to enlarge the existing endpin hole with a hand reamer- but, "legally speaking", that wouldn't be drilling a new hole.
    Then use a standard TRS to XLR cable to your balanced input.

    fishman_switchjack_endpin_jack.jpg
    Last edited by rjb; 01-03-2016 at 02:13 AM.

  6. #251
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    44
    Why didn't I think of that myself?! That's a great idea, I was stuck on using a XLR connector, but this is far better.
    Thanks!

    Hans

  7. #252
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    2
    Hi all, hate to dig up an old thread but I have found these low impedance threads very helpful and thought I might try to contribute to one.
    After trying a few prototypes and finding them to be far superior than the pickups on my collection of cheap guitars and basses I invested in some waterjet cut copper and laser cut plastic. The first pair are finished and have transformed the old Samick UM-1. I am using two CSE187L transformers with one shorted out. They both have the primary loop replaced with 1.6mm thick copper U shapes that fit into slots cut into the top of the pickup. The two halves of the tops are glued onto a peace of acrylic that has holes cut to recess the neo magnets into and also holes to pass the primary loop through. Soldering the primary loop together was tricky without melting the acrylic beneath. I then linished the tops flat on a belt sander. They are shiny now but will dull with age very quickly.

    To my ears they sound very clear and almost like an acoustic but very usable. I have to clean up my playing because every buzz and rattle comes though the amp clear as a bell. I am still experimenting with cap and pot values.
    A P-bass set I made for my bass also sounds great but a tiny bit distorted on the bottom string.

    A big thanks to all who have contributed to these threads especially Joseph Rogowski. My Korean guitars and I are most grateful for the information shared by you all.
    pickup1s.jpg
    pickup2.jpg
    David Schwab and rjb like this.

  8. #253
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Barnegat,NJ
    Posts
    510
    Quote Originally Posted by Guitar fool View Post
    Hi all, hate to dig up an old thread but I have found these low impedance threads very helpful and thought I might try to contribute to one.
    After trying a few prototypes and finding them to be far superior than the pickups on my collection of cheap guitars and basses I invested in some waterjet cut copper and laser cut plastic. The first pair are finished and have transformed the old Samick UM-1. I am using two CSE187L transformers with one shorted out. They both have the primary loop replaced with 1.6mm thick copper U shapes that fit into slots cut into the top of the pickup. The two halves of the tops are glued onto a peace of acrylic that has holes cut to recess the neo magnets into and also holes to pass the primary loop through. Soldering the primary loop together was tricky without melting the acrylic beneath. I then linished the tops flat on a belt sander. They are shiny now but will dull with age very quickly.

    To my ears they sound very clear and almost like an acoustic but very usable. I have to clean up my playing because every buzz and rattle comes though the amp clear as a bell. I am still experimenting with cap and pot values.
    A P-bass set I made for my bass also sounds great but a tiny bit distorted on the bottom string.

    A big thanks to all who have contributed to these threads especially Joseph Rogowski. My Korean guitars and I are most grateful for the information shared by you all.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	pickup1s.JPG 
Views:	191 
Size:	191.3 KB 
ID:	40255
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	pickup2.JPG 
Views:	177 
Size:	156.6 KB 
ID:	40256
    Paul,

    Thanks for the kind words. You certainly took the use of current transformer based guitar pickups to a new level with your forming of the string loops, integrating the magnets and fitting the current transformers in a traditional pickup footprint.

    See this web link for your on-board volume and tone controls. Les Paul Personal 2 The output impedance of the CSE-187L pickup is in the same range as the Les Paul Recording guitar. One of the other things you can try is to experiment with un-shorting the second current transformer and placing a variety of capacitors and loads across it to make what I call a Reflected Impedance Tone Equalization (RITE) system. You can also try using a DPDT switch to place the two current transformer outputs in series or parallel.

    The other thing you can try is to make a dual three string pickup with a very low string loop impedance and then wire the two transformers in series like a humbucker pickup. With this setup you want to keep the 3-string string loop resistance near 280 micro-ohms (or lower) so the total 3-string output impedance is near 150 ohms. Then, you can EQ high or low string sets individually. You can poke out the existing U-shaped CSE-187L primary turn and insert a little thicker wire to get the impedance a little lower. I have even fit two additional U-shaped AWG 20 magnet wires in the space next to the existing U-shaped turn to lower the impedance about 10 to 15 ohms. Just poke out the glue to fit the wire.

    A good trick to know is that a shorted out CSE-187L primary bent inward and soldered to form a shorted loop makes an impedance of about 80 ohms which includes the primary leakage inductance. The resistance of the string loop (in micro-ohms) is then multiplied by 250,000 (turns ratio squared) and then added to the 80 ohms of the primary shorted which provides a pretty accurate indication of the total impedance without needing an LCR meter. But, having an Extech LCR meter is a handy tool for experimentation. The quality of the solder joints will affect the total string loop resistance which is reflected in the output impedance. Make sure that you let the joints and transformer cool before taking any measurements.

    I hope this helps?

    Nice Job!

    Joseph J. Rogowski
    rjb likes this.

  9. #254
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Dallas-Fort Worth, TX, USA
    Posts
    151
    Paul,

    It just knocks me out seeing the low-Z goodness in a standard humbucker sized package. The cutout and detail work on the loops is unique, artistic, and mondo cool. Great job engineering and designing these.

    -Charlie

  10. #255
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    44
    That's indeed a cool way to make them.
    could you post some pictures of the back / inside of the pickups?

    Hans

  11. #256
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    2
    Sorry for the late reply. Thanks for the positive comments. I am looking forward to trying out your RITE system. It may be a while before I get a chance as I am building a garage/workshop.

    Hans, here is some photos of one that I have put together as a mock up with some old broken transformers so you can see what it looks like. Once the loop is soldered together I then use a belt sander to take off the excess solder and copper to leave the top flat.
    pickup3.jpgpickup4.jpg

  12. #257
    Pickup Maker David Schwab's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Staten Island, NY
    Posts
    10,918
    Quote Originally Posted by charrich56 View Post
    Paul,

    It just knocks me out seeing the low-Z goodness in a standard humbucker sized package. The cutout and detail work on the loops is unique, artistic, and mondo cool. Great job engineering and designing these.

    -Charlie
    Don't forget that you can wind a standard humbucker with low-z coils. I made bass pickups like that for years!
    It would be possible to describe everything scientifically, but it would make no sense; it would be without meaning, as if you described a Beethoven symphony as a variation of wave pressure. Albert Einstein

    www.sgd-lutherie.com
    www.soundcloud.com/davidravenmoon
    SGD Lutherie Facebook page

  13. #258
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Dallas-Fort Worth, TX, USA
    Posts
    151
    David,

    I have indeed been rewinding "normal" humbucker bobbins with #32 to #36 AWG and have made several low-Z humbuckers, Strat-sized single coils, and P-90's. Low as in less than 200 ohms impedance at 1Khz. That works great for a mic level input to most mixers, or with an onboard preamp. I think it's an excellent way to go for getting a really high fidelity signal out of the strings and into whatever signal chain you want.

    I've been following this thread with Joseph's experiments and advice and really like that Paul has done the "single loop" ultra low-Z design with current transformers in that size/form factor.

    You have been a good contributor to the low-Z posts on the forum and I really dig the low-Z hi-fi bass playing clips you did.

    -Charlie

  14. #259
    Pickup Maker David Schwab's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Staten Island, NY
    Posts
    10,918
    I've also done it with regular 42 gauge wire. That's the way Bill Lawrence did the Les Paul Signature pickups too. You get a different tone than from using heavier wire.

    I used a JFET preamp, but you could also use a transformer.
    It would be possible to describe everything scientifically, but it would make no sense; it would be without meaning, as if you described a Beethoven symphony as a variation of wave pressure. Albert Einstein

    www.sgd-lutherie.com
    www.soundcloud.com/davidravenmoon
    SGD Lutherie Facebook page

  15. #260
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Dallas-Fort Worth, TX, USA
    Posts
    151
    Quote Originally Posted by David Schwab View Post
    I've also done it with regular 42 gauge wire. That's the way Bill Lawrence did the Les Paul Signature pickups too. You get a different tone than from using heavier wire.

    I used a JFET preamp, but you could also use a transformer.
    The ones I built, both with standard humbucker and single coil parts were about 40-50 ohms DCR and about 35 Millihenry. For the humbucker, I targeted 100 ohms/bobbin and 70 mHenry, and put the coils in parallel.

    When you get that low on output, you need about 28-32 dB gain. JFET preamps work well if you bootstrap the gain up. A transformer followed by a single stage simple JFET preamp works really well. ( but you have to make sure the transformer itself doesn't pick up hum.) I can post schematics for any of these if someone is interested in experimenting.

    I like to use the larger wire partially because it's easier to wind (for me) and doesn't stretch as easily, and it makes the resistive part of the impedance lower for better matching and step-up ratio with the transformer, or bridging to a medium impedance input like a mic preamp channel on a mixer. But the 42 AWG in general should be just fine into a medium or high Z input. Will have to do the experiment for tone differences.

    The Xicon miniature audio transformers from Mouser can do a good job for guitar and fit in a control cavity without much of a problem. Look at the TM series, for example the 42TM117-RC. The bass response drops off below 80 Hz or so, so one would have to go to bigger iron for this approach for bass. You can get about 17 dB voltage step-up, and then about 12 dB or so more gain from the JFET preamp, with very low battery drain and low noise.

  16. #261
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    2
    Hi, I'm new here.

    Very interesting and inspiring stuff.

    I remember reading somewhere in one of these threads "make sure you have phantom power turned off". I'm keen try building one of these things to try out on a banjo and a tenor guitar but I do usually have phantom power turned on - what would happen if I had 48v going through the output side of a CSE187L?

  17. #262
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Barnegat,NJ
    Posts
    510
    Quote Originally Posted by ptsefton View Post
    Hi, I'm new here.

    Very interesting and inspiring stuff.

    I remember reading somewhere in one of these threads "make sure you have phantom power turned off". I'm keen try building one of these things to try out on a banjo and a tenor guitar but I do usually have phantom power turned on - what would happen if I had 48v going through the output side of a CSE187L?

    Welcome aboard!

    Read this link to see details about the potential damage. Pay attention to reference 5. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phantom_power.

    If you look how power is supplied to an XLR microphone you will see that the positive voltage goes to both pins 2 and 3 with the same voltage. That means that there is no voltage added to the AC mic signal output of the current transformer if it is wired correctly. The output of the CSE187L or any current transformer (CT) should go to pins 2 and 3 of the XLR connector. Therefore, no current will flow between these pins. Pin 1 is the ground connector to ground the metal frame of the current transformer and the string loop to minimize noise. Current would only flow between pin 1 and either pins 2 or 3 but if you measure the resistance between these pins it should read open. It is a good quality control check to ensure that there is no continuity between either pin 1 to pin 3 or pin 1 to pin 2 to make sure that any phantom voltage would not affect the transformer. It is always a good thing to turn off phantom power so you can to prevent any mishaps if one of the wires in the XLR connector becomes shorted or undone.

    Some of my latest research shows that I can increase the output by using a thicker primary string loop wire. Typically with a CSE187L using the AWG 12 pre-installed CT primary winding connected to a 6 inch long string loop of AWG 11 wire at 105 micro ohms per inch adds 105 X 6 or 630 micro ohms. Since the 500 turn CT equals an impedance ratio of 500 squared or 250,000 or one quarter of a million. Then just divide 630 micro ohms by 4 to see how much the string loop adds to the output impedance. 630/4 equals 157.5 ohms. Now all we need to do is add that to the impedance of the CSE187L shorted out at 80 ohms. So the output impedance of this setup will be 80 plus 157.5 or 237.5 ohms just shy of the upper limit of feeding a typical mic input bridging impedance (typically 2400 ohms actual input impedance) for mics rated at 150 ohms that can be anywhere from 100 ohms to 250 actual impedance measured in ohms.

    If you obtain a CSE186L which is a 1 to 166 turns ratio CT and remove the 3 turn primary, you can install a single U-shaped turn of AWG 8 wire and only need to make one connection joint to form a full string loop. To remove the AWG 16 installed primary do this. The secondary still has 500 turns on it. Use copper tubing to make the joint in the string loop to ensure a good low resistance joint which controls the maximum current that can be developed in the string loop by the vibrating string in a magnetic field.

    1. Remove the yellow tape using a pick and/or a needle nose pliers.
    2. Cut a rectangular hole 7/16 inch by 9/16 inch about 1/8 inch deep in a piece of wood to hold the transformer flat to put in a vice to press the AWG 16 primary wires out from the glued in state.
    3. Once the primary is free of the glue, use a pliers to push the wires out to fully remove from the CT.

    Now you will have square openings to allow a single loop of AWG 8 at 52 micro ohms per inch to be placed into the CT. Use electrical tape on the outside walls of the transformer laminate to keep the string loop wire from shorting out to the metal frame. A 7.5 inch long total string loop including the part that goes through the CT will make a string loop of 7.5 X 52 or 390 micro-ohms. Add about 10 ohms for leakage inductance and the output impedance for this setup should be very near 100 ohms. The output will be about twice as high (10 mV p-p) as the setup using the AWG 12 primary (5mV p-p).

    Run the output of this CT to pins 2 and 3 of the XLR connector and clean the glue from the metal transformer frame to ground the frame and the string loop to the mic cable shield and connect to pin 1 of the XLR connector.

    Do a loud strum, just make sure that you set the mic input level to not clip showing the red flashing LED.

    Now you can enjoy your new pickup without worry.

    Joseph J. Rogowski
    Last edited by bbsailor; 08-02-2017 at 08:48 PM.

  18. #263
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by bbsailor View Post
    Welcome aboard!

    Read this link to see details about the potential damage. Pay attention to reference 5. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phantom_power.

    If you look how power is supplied to an XLR microphone you will see that the positive voltage goes to both pins 2 and 3 with the same voltage. That means that there is no voltage added to the AC mic signal output of the current transformer if it is wired correctly. The output of the CSE187L or any current transformer (CT) should go to pins 2 and 3 of the XLR connector. Therefore, no current will flow between these pins. Pin 1 is the ground connector to ground the metal frame of the current transformer and the string loop to minimize noise. Current would only flow between pin 1 and either pins 2 or 3 but if you measure the resistance between these pins it should read open. It is a good quality control check to ensure that there is no continuity between either pin 1 to pin 3 or pin 1 to pin 2 to make sure that any phantom voltage would not affect the transformer. It is always a good thing to turn off phantom power so you can to prevent any mishaps if one of the wires in the XLR connector becomes shorted or undone.

    Some of my latest research shows that I can increase the output by using a thicker primary string loop wire. Typically with a CSE187L using the AWG 12 pre-installed CT primary winding connected to a 6 inch long string loop of AWG 11 wire at 105 micro ohms per inch adds 105 X 6 or 630 micro ohms. Since the 500 turn CT equals an impedance ratio of 500 squared or 250,000 or one quarter of a million. Then just divide 630 micro ohms by 4 to see how much the string loop adds to the output impedance. 630/4 equals 157.5 ohms. Now all we need to do is add that to the impedance of the CSE187L shorted out at 80 ohms. So the output impedance of this setup will be 80 plus 157.5 or 237.5 ohms just shy of the upper limit of feeding a typical mic input bridging impedance (typically 2400 ohms actual input impedance) for mics rated at 150 ohms that can be anywhere from 100 ohms to 250 actual impedance measured in ohms.

    If you obtain a CSE186L which is a 1 to 166 turns ratio CT and remove the 3 turn primary, you can install a single U-shaped turn of AWG 8 wire and only need to make one connection joint to form a full string loop. To remove the AWG 16 installed primary do this. The secondary still has 500 turns on it. Use copper tubing to make the joint in the string loop to ensure a good low resistance joint which controls the maximum current that can be developed in the string loop by the vibrating string in a magnetic field.

    1. Remove the yellow tape using a pick and/or a needle nose pliers.
    2. Cut a rectangular hole 7/16 inch by 9/16 inch about 1/8 inch deep in a piece of wood to hold the transformer flat to put in a vice to press the AWG 16 primary wires out from the glued in state.
    3. Once the primary is free of the glue, use a pliers to push the wires out to fully remove from the CT.

    Now you will have square openings to allow a single loop of AWG 8 at 52 micro ohms per inch to be placed into the CT. Use electrical tape on the outside walls of the transformer laminate to keep the string loop wire from shorting out to the metal frame. A 7.5 inch long total string loop including the part that goes through the CT will make a string loop of 7.5 X 52 or 390 micro-ohms. Add about 10 ohms for leakage inductance and the output impedance for this setup should be very near 100 ohms. The output will be about twice as high (10 mV p-p) as the setup using the AWG 12 primary (5mV p-p).

    Run the output of this CT to pins 2 and 3 of the XLR connector and clean the glue from the metal transformer frame to ground the frame and the string loop to the mic cable shield and connect to pin 1 of the XLR connector.

    Do a loud strum, just make sure that you set the mic input level to not clip showing the red flashing LED.

    Now you can enjoy your new pickup without worry.

    Joseph J. Rogowski
    Thanks for all that Joseph, sounds great. I'm waiting on some parts - I'll let you know how I go.

    Peter

Page 8 of 8 FirstFirst ... 2345678

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Earth Sound Research
    By Matthias in forum Guitar Amps
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 03-18-2013, 09:14 PM
  2. Smoke/Burning Smell (Guitar Research T64RS Head)
    By ffaf 07 in forum Maintenance, Troubleshooting & Repair
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 03-13-2009, 09:35 AM
  3. Earth Sound Research/Fender Twin Trem/Verb questions
    By shiner555 in forum Maintenance, Troubleshooting & Repair
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 11-26-2007, 09:40 PM
  4. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-09-2007, 08:46 AM
  5. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-03-2007, 12:41 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •