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Prepping NOS resistor/capacitor leads for first use

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  • Prepping NOS resistor/capacitor leads for first use

    I have a cache of Piher resistors from the 70's and a collection of Mullard/philips mustards for the same era... all unused and tested to read within spec.

    Of course the leads are pretty oxidized... the resistors wouldn't even give me a reading unless I took some light sand paper and cleaned the leads up. So it led me to wonder if there are any special steps people take for this... like sand down and clean with alcohol ... or some deoxit... or ... well, that's my question I guess??

    How would one go about a very thorough cleaning for usage?

    I think I will be building a 1987 type clone... I ordered some JTM45 trannies from Metro Amp in the states... which I assume will show up in about a month or so.... so it will be all JTM45 but 1987 for the v1 setup. AT least that's where I'm leaning. Which I think more or less makes is a 67-68 1987, or a modified JTM45

    Thanks!!
    "'He who first proclaims to have golden ears is the only one in the argument who can truly have golden ears.' The opponent, therefore, must, by the rules, have tin ears, since there can only be one golden-eared person per argument." - Randall Aiken

  • #2
    I have a small square of emery cloth on my bench for just this purpose. 400 grit,I think, but it isn't critical.

    SOmetimes I reach for my Xacto knife and scrape the leads clean.


    SOmetimes I use mt fiber brush eraser, but I usually don't bother.
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

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    • #3
      I use my craft knife or blade to take off the crud before tinning with fresh solder.
      Support for Fender, Marshall, Mesa, VOX and many more. https://jonsnell.co.uk

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      • #4
        Ive tried a bunch of different techniques. But the fastest and cleanest way is to straighten out the resistor lead and lay it flat against a hard flat surface like a block of hardwood or granite countertop, etc. The use The rounded back side of a pair of needle nose pliers, and lightly scrape it back and forth along the length of the lead while gently applying pressure. Slowly rotate the resistor as you do this and you’ll start to see a the tarnish fade and a shiny tin appear
        If I have a 50% chance of guessing the right answer, I guess wrong 80% of the time.

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        • #5
          I should mention that some needle nose are better than others for this. If you’ve got a few different ones you’ll find which one works better.
          If I have a 50% chance of guessing the right answer, I guess wrong 80% of the time.

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          • #6
            If you want smooth surfaces without grain or discoloration, use sharp scissors to scrape the pins once they are straight. For me they allow better grip and pressure measurement than other scraping tools in that task.
            I particularly use children's scissors

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            • #7
              Molten NaOH!*

              kidding, scotchbrite

              (*only to remove ultra fine magnet wire insulation before immediately tinning)

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              • #8
                Na-OH, Na-a-a-OH. DAylight come and me wan' go home.


                Come mister pickup man sodium hydroxide
                Daylight come and me wan'go home.
                Cleans me wire off, source of me own pride
                Daylight come and me wan' go home.
                Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

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                • #9
                  HAHA! Nice one

                  Thanks all for the cool suggestions... I will try out some of them!
                  "'He who first proclaims to have golden ears is the only one in the argument who can truly have golden ears.' The opponent, therefore, must, by the rules, have tin ears, since there can only be one golden-eared person per argument." - Randall Aiken

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                  • #10
                    +1 on using a Scotchbrite pad

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