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Non-stompbox vintage effects

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  • Enzo
    replied
    The 6th floor landing in the cinder block stairwell of my college dorm was just perfect for blowing blues harp.

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  • DrGonz78
    replied
    Not sure this counts in the same way but older records had to utilize making reverb in physical form.

    https://reverb.com/news/6-echo-chamb...-popular-music

    Leave a comment:


  • vintagekiki
    commented on 's reply
    Weird Vintage Spring Speaker Reverb

  • vintagekiki
    replied
    https://www.google.com/search?q=spring+speaker+reverberator&source=lnms&tbm=isc h
    spring speaker reverberator
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTZGXUnvy-Q
    Slinky Spring Reverb in a Cigar Box - Guitar Test
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MbCspUJKRDs
    DIY Plate Reverb
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u6eZ_JbmBDw
    Plate Echo - The Greatest Studio Effect Of All Time

    Leave a comment:


  • g1
    replied
    Originally posted by tboy View Post
    The device I spoke of was not a "necklace reverb" and was not electronic or electro-mechanical. It was a purely mechanical contraption that was mounted in front of the speaker. I was hoping to find a photo or two because it really is a strange-looking thing, but so far I've seen no mention of it anywhere on the web.
    I guess not the FR-40 unit?

    Click image for larger version

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  • Mick Bailey
    replied
    See this;

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=00_pbkyN2cc

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  • Helmholtz
    replied
    It was a purely mechanical contraption that was mounted in front of the speaker.
    You really make me curious about the principle.

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  • tboy
    replied
    Originally posted by tboy View Post
    Before electronic spring-reverb units, there were mechanical spring-reverb devices...
    Originally posted by Helmholtz View Post
    ...necklace reverbs were not any more mechanical/less electronic than Accutronics/Gibbs etc. reverb pans. Principle is the same.
    The device I spoke of was not a "necklace reverb" and was not electronic or electro-mechanical. It was a purely mechanical contraption that was mounted in front of the speaker. I was hoping to find a photo or two because it really is a strange-looking thing, but so far I've seen no mention of it anywhere on the web.

    Leave a comment:


  • Helmholtz
    replied
    Originally posted by tboy View Post
    Before electronic spring-reverb units, there were mechanical spring-reverb devices built into organ speaker cabinets. They were scary-looking things.
    FWIW, Hammond necklace reverbs were not any more mechanical/less electronic than Accutronics/Gibbs etc. reverb pans. Principle is the same:
    Electric motor excites a torsional wave that slowly propagates along the springs and induces a delayed signal voltage in the receiving generator. Multiple wave reflections add to reverb.
    Last edited by Helmholtz; 10-22-2020, 11:14 PM.

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  • Leo_Gnardo
    replied
    The E-Bow got its mention, but that set off a nerve way back in my brain. Didn't I read about some gadget in the 1970's called the Gizmotron? Gizmo for short? Guitar Player covered it back then. Indeed, it got a mention on this website 14 Jun 2014 by the great waldo. https://music-electronics-forum.com/...ge2#post529398

    Apparently Gizmotron is a motorized brush that fits on the guitar over the bridge. When the player switches it on, rotating bristles stroke the strings then it's a matter of hammering-on and palm-muting to get the chords & notes intended. 10cc's hit songwriting team Lol Creme and Kevin Godley are credited with having developed it in the mid 70's and there is a current version offered for sale.

    Gizmotron website: https://www.gizmotron.com/aboutus

    Click image for larger version

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  • Leo_Gnardo
    replied
    Originally posted by Chuck H View Post
    This is (said to be) Frampton's
    HAH! How did I miss this? It's one of a pair of talkbox enclosures made by Bob Heil for Peter Frampton I guess in the early 1970's. 1981 I was tasked with making them work again, and so they did until their owner started using and selling custom-made pyramid shaped talkboxes under the "Framptone" name. Biggest problem was threads that were supposed to mate with a screw-in hi frequency driver were totally skunked. A friend who did auto machine shop work suggested fitting them with copper plumbing pipe adapters and PC-7 epoxy. Worked perfectly well, that's what you're seeing in this photo. January 2005 I spotted one of them on display in the Hollywood Florida House of Blues.

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  • vintagekiki
    replied
    Talk box vs vocoder. Although the principles are different, (sound) effect is similar.
    At the end, it all depends down to the inventiveness of the performers who use the instrument.

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  • Chuck H
    replied
    Originally posted by vintagekiki View Post
    Vocoder in the beginning (analog)
    A talkbox has a similar sound to a vocoder, but the effect is achieved in a different manner.
    I'm not seeing it.?. And anyway, I think the range of products and their use in classic recordings earns the "talk box" stuff it's own mention.

    When I was a kid, maybe fourteen or fifteen (I was already a nerd), I built my own talk box from parts I had around. The effects send on my amp went to a small amp that powered a speaker that I duct tapped into a funnel. A tube ran from the end of the funnel into my mouth. Then I plugged the mic into the effects return. Very rough version of the idea but I had some fun with it.

    Leave a comment:


  • vintagekiki
    replied
    Originally posted by Chuck H View Post
    I'm surprised I'm the first one bringing up the "talk box" offerings.
    Vocoder in the beginning (analog)
    A talkbox has a similar sound to a vocoder, but the effect is achieved in a different manner.

    Leave a comment:


  • vintagekiki
    replied
    Originally posted by nosaj View Post
    Wonder if its similar to the expandora?
    nosaj
    No, its similar to Univox U-250 Uni-Fuzz

    https://www.premierguitar.com/articles/1969_Univox_U_250_Uni_Fuzz


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