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Truss Rod issue.

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  • #31
    you still posting on my thread? i ask you again- dont pls. dont waste yr time again. I wont be reading it

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    • #32
      Originally posted by John_H View Post
      Steve, I have to disagree. Double action truss rods allow you to adjust backwards on them, but do you really want a guitar that needs to be adjusted backwards? I've had the occasion to adjust on a couple that needed backwards compensation. The result was always a really dead sounding guitar that didn't stay tuned very well. I build a lot of necks, and I'll never use one. My favorite is good old fashioned traditional truss rods. They're way more solid than any "box" type unit.
      the reason to use a double acting rod is exactly this situation. If you don't have enough relief with string tension you can add relief to the neck. The other benefit is the rod is never slack. Slack rods can buzz.

      If you had a dead sounding neck, there was something wrong with that neck.

      I never use curved traditional rods. I always use over/under dual action rods. They require less wood removed and don't compress the neck like the curved rods.
      It would be possible to describe everything scientifically, but it would make no sense; it would be without meaning, as if you described a Beethoven symphony as a variation of wave pressure. Albert Einstein


      http://coneyislandguitars.com
      www.soundcloud.com/davidravenmoon

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Sea Chief View Post
        you still posting on my thread? i ask you again- dont pls. dont waste yr time again. I wont be reading it
        All members can post in any thread. If you ask a question at least try to seem interested in the answers instead of just complaining. Your posts have been reported to me.
        It would be possible to describe everything scientifically, but it would make no sense; it would be without meaning, as if you described a Beethoven symphony as a variation of wave pressure. Albert Einstein


        http://coneyislandguitars.com
        www.soundcloud.com/davidravenmoon

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        • #34
          Originally posted by David Schwab View Post
          the reason to use a double acting rod is exactly this situation. If you don't have enough relief with string tension you can add relief to the neck. The other benefit is the rod is never slack. Slack rods can buzz.

          If you had a dead sounding neck, there was something wrong with that neck.

          I never use curved traditional rods. I always use over/under dual action rods. They require less wood removed and don't compress the neck like the curved rods.
          Sorry David, but you'll never get me to buy in the benefits of a DA rod other than you could otherwise adjust an inherently bad neck. To stiffen the neck the truss has to work against string tension. If you push in the opposite direction, it can only have the opposite affect, and make the neck less stiff. This will cause faster decay, and make the guitar sound dead. I'm not a scientist, or an engineer, but that's my rational.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by David Schwab View Post
            All members can post in any thread. If you ask a question at least try to seem interested in the answers instead of just complaining. Your posts have been reported to me.
            Eh? interested in answers like #19 ?

            You say I should instead of complaining about such troll comments (the 1st this prick posts on my thread but countless similar on another thread/ nowt but troll post after post).. I should be interested?!

            utterly ridiculous.

            I'm not interested in such waster posts, nor the slightest bit interested in double truss rods if I dont have one for goodness sake; ok if the thread diverts & folks talk amongst themselves about them- but dont tell me please I should be interested in any digression!

            SC
            Last edited by Sea Chief; 08-13-2015, 11:59 PM.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by John_H View Post
              Sorry David, but you'll never get me to buy in the benefits of a DA rod other than you could otherwise adjust an inherently bad neck. To stiffen the neck the truss has to work against string tension. If you push in the opposite direction, it can only have the opposite affect, and make the neck less stiff. This will cause faster decay, and make the guitar sound dead. I'm not a scientist, or an engineer, but that's my rational.
              David King gave a great talk on truss rods at the last GAL conference in Tacoma. He made a whole bunch of mock-up necks and tested a variety of characteristics. IIRC, a single compression rod in a curved slot was the lowest weight and had the best turns-to-relief movement ratio of many rods tested. The catch, though, is that everything around the rod, including tiny details like fret slot width and degree of fret compression, need to be just right to allow the right balance of relief and potential range of adjustability. The double-acting rod, though heavier and bringing the possibility of changing the neck resonance, as John suggests, I think is the "safer" option from a construction standpoint. Coupled with carbon fiber reinforcement rods or tubes, it might even be necessary, in case the neck is too stiff. With a few more iterations, and maybe some consultation with Mr. King, I'd like to try the single-action rod in a curved slot, just to add that technique to my repertoire.

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              • #37
                On the note of a DA rod making the neck "less stiff" when adjusted to create relief... Not at all. Think about it. If you post tension the wood in any direction it stiffens. Simply put, if the tension of the strings alone isn't enough to bend the neck, so you force a bend, that is added tension. If the wood must be stressed in either direction there is added tension. JM2C on that.
                "Take two placebos, works twice as well." Enzo

                "Now get off my lawn with your silicooties and boom-chucka speakers and computers masquerading as amplifiers" Justin Thomas

                "Being born on third base and thinking that you must have hit a triple is pure delusion!" Steve A

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                • #38
                  are you using a capo on the first fret?..Undo the rod let it rest for a day try to get any old dirt and sawdust out put some WD40 down in there slowly retighten with the capo on and check with a .007-,009 feeler gauge at the 7th or 9th fret..The worst case, rod may of been over tightened and crushed the wood inside..PITA to fix...GO SLOW...It can take a few days for it to set..If it is Hot or cold..I live at the beach and redo my rods 3-4 times a year..

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