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New StewMac tool for high spot fret levelling: The" Fret Kisser"

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Helmholtz View Post
    It's not the appropriate tool for low frets (but it wouldn't really make the problem worse). It is generally not suited to cure fret wear issues. High frets are most commonly found on new (even plekked) instruments.
    But, the average person wouldn't know if they have a low or high fret and if you just file away on what you think is a high fret (but really is a low fret), you will make the problem worse, because now you have two low frets..

    True, that most issues are because of high frets, but I do see a fair amount of low frets in my shop.


    Originally posted by Helmholtz View Post
    The tool helps me to save alot of time and work. It only takes off fret material where needed, while complete fret dressing bears the risk of unneccesarily lowering too many frets - especially when done without string tension/simulation.
    You can do exactly the same with a simple file that doesn't cost 120 USD..
    http://guitarfix.dk

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    • #17
      you will make the problem worse, because now you have two low frets..
      As the FretKisser in this case would ride on a low and a high fret, the leveled fret would come out at an intermediate height. This might actually be a slight improvement. A complete fret dressing on the other hand would bring all neighboring fret heights down to the lowest fret anyway.

      You can do exactly the same with a simple file that doesn't cost 120 USD..
      Well filing down just a portion of a single high fret with a normal file is tricky and risky. I have done this in the past using a fret crowning file, but its time consuming because it requires checking after each stroke and it's easy to take off too much.
      Last edited by Helmholtz; 07-10-2019, 02:37 PM.
      - Own Opinions Only -

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Helmholtz View Post
        As the FretKisser in this case would ride on a low and a high fret, the levelled fret would come out at an intermediate height. This might actually be a slight improvement. A complete fret dressing on the other hand would bring all neighboring fret heights down to the lowest fret anyway.



        Well filing down just a portion of a single high fret with a normal file is tricky and risky. I have down this in the past using a fret crowning file, but its time consuming because it requires checking after each stroke and it's easy to take off too much.
        I would think a high fret would be a "popped" fret. As I can't imagine any other way for a single fret to be high after any leveling. That should require different attention.

        I suppose a high fret could also be a replaced fret. In which case this tool offers a very good way to work replaced frets without further reduction of the surrounding frets. Which is a very good thing.
        "Take two placebos, works twice as well." Enzo

        "Now get off my lawn with your silicooties and boom-chucka speakers and computers masquerading as amplifiers" Justin Thomas

        "Being born on third base and thinking that you must have hit a triple is pure delusion!" Steve A

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        • #19
          I would think a high fret would be a "popped" fret. As I can't imagine any other way for a single fret to be high after any leveling. That should require different attention.
          There are ways to identify and take care of a "popped" or loose fret. But (factory) fret leveling is rarely perfect.


          BTW, anyone heard of John_H lately?
          Last edited by Helmholtz; 07-10-2019, 02:36 PM.
          - Own Opinions Only -

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Helmholtz View Post
            As the FretKisser in this case would ride on a low and a high fret, the levelled fret would come out at an intermediate height. This might actually be a slight improvement. A complete fret dressing on the other hand would bring all neighboring fret heights down to the lowest fret anyway.



            Well filing down just a portion of a single high fret with a normal file is tricky and risky. I have down this in the past using a fret crowning file, but its time consuming because it requires checking after each stroke and it's easy to take off too much.
            You don't use a fret crowning file for that.

            Anyway, let's agree to disagree

            I work with this every day and know whats works for me (and my customers). Others may have different methods, which I fully respect.

            Peace
            http://guitarfix.dk

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Helmholtz View Post
              BTW, anyone heard of John_H lately?
              Well his last activity was a couple of months ago, but his most recent posts show he hasn't visibly participated since March? Let's hope he's just busy right now. Being as he's in Las Vegas he's certainly battling the heat this time of year.
              "Take two placebos, works twice as well." Enzo

              "Now get off my lawn with your silicooties and boom-chucka speakers and computers masquerading as amplifiers" Justin Thomas

              "Being born on third base and thinking that you must have hit a triple is pure delusion!" Steve A

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              • #22
                Yep. I hope he's in good health. I always enjoy his posts- lots of awesome builds.
                "Yeah, well, you know, that's just, like, your opinion, man."

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                • #23
                  This

                  Click image for larger version

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                  is the kind of traditional "spot" leveling file I have been using for some 30 years now. It's single-cut, straight and sharp. Works fine, but doesn't allow to treat only one high fret without unneccessarily "kissing" some others as well. Reason is that the single high fret in the middle causes some rocking action when filing.
                  Last edited by Helmholtz; 07-10-2019, 02:36 PM.
                  - Own Opinions Only -

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