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  • Charging one pole?

    Hi,

    I have a single coil pickup where one of the poles (the G-string) is very weak compared to the other poles.

    Is it possible to charge just one pole, without affecting the others? Maybe putting a Neodynium rod on top of just that pole?

    I cannot take out the pole, it is epoxied in place..

    Thanks.
    http://guitarfix.dk

  • #2
    Is it possible to charge just one pole, without affecting the others? Maybe putting a Neodynium rod on top of just that pole?
    Yes, here is my method: https://music-electronics-forum.com/...l=1#post529722
    - Own Opinions Only -

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Helmholtz View Post
      Interesting, I will try that
      http://guitarfix.dk

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      • #4
        This is pretty smart. I never considered adjusting the G string problem by altering the magnet strength. The problem I always had with the G string relative to single coils (as I interpreted it) was the pole stagger. I play a plain G and the vintage stagger is, of course, too loud. So pickup makers started offering a flat stagger. Well that's no good either because it makes the D and B sound weak. Now I guess the modern stagger for a plain G is more common, but it's radiused for a vintage strat fingerboard (9.5"?) and I play a Warmoth "Radius" fingerboard (16"). Anyway, I've never been happy with any stock pole stagger. What I do, and I don't recommend it, is move the poles. I use a wood dowel and a small hammer and just place the dowel on the poles and tap with the hammer to move the pole pieces up or down. I've adjusted several like this but the reason I don't recommend it is because I did ruin one once where moving the magnet pole clipped the winding. I haven't had to re pot the pickups after, but it's probably a good idea if you want to be thorough.

        I'm probably going to get some heat for this so I want to point out that I disclosed the risk and reiterate that I don't recommend it. Proceed at your own risk.
        "Take two placebos, works twice as well." Enzo

        "Now get off my lawn with your silicooties and boom-chucka speakers and computers masquerading as amplifiers" Justin Thomas

        "Being born on third base and thinking that you must have hit a triple is pure delusion!" Steve A

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        • #5
          Well the risk, especially with old strat PUs is that the wire tends to stick to the poles (either caused by corrosion or because it binds to the lacquer coating). If the poles are moved it may break the wire or cause shorted turns.
          Two of the PUs in my '68 strat had to be rewound because the former owner had attempted to push poles (not much actually). And I have seen a number of others with the same symptoms that needed to be rewound.
          - Own Opinions Only -

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          • #6
            I would never try it on a vintage pickup. For one thing, they're collectible and historic so altering them in ANY way is a detriment to their value. And, of course, there's the risk of shorted turns. Maybe I've been lucky? More likely the risk is lower with more modern pickups because of a construction difference like the smoothness, lower level of oxidation and deeper wax potting that holds the wire in place. Anyway, having lost two vintage pickups to this method and seeing several others I would fully expect you to be 100% against it.

            For me and in my case I wasn't bonking on vintage pickups and I didn't like them the way they were anyway. So nothing to lose.
            "Take two placebos, works twice as well." Enzo

            "Now get off my lawn with your silicooties and boom-chucka speakers and computers masquerading as amplifiers" Justin Thomas

            "Being born on third base and thinking that you must have hit a triple is pure delusion!" Steve A

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Chuck H View Post
              I would never try it on a vintage pickup. For one thing, they're collectible and historic so altering them in ANY way is a detriment to their value. And, of course, there's the risk of shorted turns. Maybe I've been lucky? More likely the risk is lower with more modern pickups because of a construction difference like the smoothness, lower level of oxidation and deeper wax potting that holds the wire in place. Anyway, having lost two vintage pickups to this method and seeing several others I would fully expect you to be 100% against it.

              For me and in my case I wasn't bonking on vintage pickups and I didn't like them the way they were anyway. So nothing to lose.
              I actually got away with the pole push method back then with my new 1970 strat. Would never do it again.
              The magnet strength calibration method is effective and safe.
              - Own Opinions Only -

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