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paint-inks for stamping pickups

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  • #16
    For the record... I quoted an incorrect part number above. The 3M solvent resistant masking tape is their 2040 line. I think the 2070 line is their "safe release" low adhesion product. So... Use 2040 masking tape.

    I chose to make a new post post AND an edit in case the info has already been documented by anyone. An edit would be more likely to go unnoticed.
    "Take two placebos, works twice as well." Enzo

    "Now get off my lawn with your silicooties and boom-chucka speakers and computers masquerading as amplifiers" Justin Thomas

    "Being born on third base and thinking that you must have hit a triple is pure delusion!" Steve A

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    • #17
      Originally posted by vitaliikit View Post
      pickup flatwork has a porous surface, and the tape does not lie closely .., for nitro-lacquer, the tape is not a problem. but the second option might work. it seems mister Brandon does so [ATTACH=CONFIG]54815[/ATTACH]
      One tried and true way to solve problems is not getting into them.

      In this picture I can *clearly* see that the bottom part (as seen) of the pickup where magnets and wire are, was dipped in some kind of lacquer, you can see itīs shiny and transparent, does not look like wax to me, while the top triangular flap where connecting rivets and rubber stamp are looks dry.
      The separating line is clearly visible.

      Maybe pickups are held by the flap with pliers and put on a shallow tray sideways, as shown, for as long as needed.
      A tray with many pickups might even get inside some vacuum chamber for deeper potting.

      The stamp area, which might use standard ink (oily? ... water based?) does not even touch lacquer.

      Iīm not into pickups, which one is shown?
      An original one? A custom wind?
      Juan Manuel Fahey

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      • #18
        As for that separation line, I'm going with tape as the cause. You can see the tell tale ridging that happens when masking tape is used.
        "Take two placebos, works twice as well." Enzo

        "Now get off my lawn with your silicooties and boom-chucka speakers and computers masquerading as amplifiers" Justin Thomas

        "Being born on third base and thinking that you must have hit a triple is pure delusion!" Steve A

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        • #19
          Originally posted by J M Fahey View Post

          Iīm not into pickups, which one is shown?
          An original one? A custom wind?
          this is Brandonwound pickups , you can easily find it on ebay

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          • #20
            Thanks.

            As of pickup lacquering, yes, maybe itīs tape.

            My doubt is that tape is fine to protect from sprayed paint which if itīs the case, is only decorative; not sure at all how tape applied to such a flimsy and rough surface could protect that area when pickup is fully submerged in lacquer for anti-microphonic potting.

            So my doubt remains: was that pickup fully submerged for deep impregnation?

            Or it was just spray painted so it looks potted?
            Juan Manuel Fahey

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            • #21
              Did anyone try the shellac? I would if I had a pot of wax but I don't.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by copperheadroads View Post
                I'm using water based finish to dip my bobbins in & the ink is not holding up as it gets cloudy . Have not used nitro in years for bobbins . i will have to try it after they are wound & see it it survives the wax pot .
                Have you tried sealing the stamped flatwork with a spray on clear coat (let dry), then dipping ?

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                • #23
                  I suspect we are way overthinking this as usual. I really doubt Fender went to any trouble at all. Meanwhile good old carbon based India ink is pretty much impervious to solvents, oils and paraffin if you want black.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by David King View Post
                    I suspect we are way overthinking this as usual. I really doubt Fender went to any trouble at all. Meanwhile good old carbon based India ink is pretty much impervious to solvents, oils and paraffin if you want black.
                    Sure. But plain ol ink pens probably had something coser to a basic india ink product in them back then. Which was carbon in water with a little plant gum or egg white. Modern ink pens use dyes mixed with things like alcohol based polymers and anti clotting and drying agents so they last longer on the shelf and don't dry up. Unless pickup makers are using quill pens or buying specifically "india ink" pens for $$$ I assumed the discussion was about marking pickups with regular pens of today. Which, I suppose, may be different from what Fender used.?.
                    "Take two placebos, works twice as well." Enzo

                    "Now get off my lawn with your silicooties and boom-chucka speakers and computers masquerading as amplifiers" Justin Thomas

                    "Being born on third base and thinking that you must have hit a triple is pure delusion!" Steve A

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Chuck H View Post
                      Sure. But plain ol ink pens probably had something closer to a basic india ink product in them back then. Which was carbon in water with a little plant gum or egg white. Modern ink pens use dyes mixed with things like alcohol based polymers and anti clotting and drying agents so they last longer on the shelf and don't dry up. Unless pickup makers are using quill pens or buying specifically "india ink" pens for $$$ I assumed the discussion was about marking pickups with regular pens of today. Which, I suppose, may be different from what Fender used.?.
                      Black-ink pens sold as "archival" typically contain carbon black in the ink. I like Sakura pens. My test is to write on a sample of the the surface to be used, allow ink to dry, and leave the sample on a sunny windowsill, in direct sun, for weeks. If it fades, it flunks. This will weed the usual dye-based inks out fairly quickly. There are a few kinds of dye that are pretty resistant to fading in the sunlight, but these dyes are expensive,

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Chuck H View Post
                        Sure. But plain ol ink pens probably had something coser to a basic india ink product in them back then. Which was carbon in water with a little plant gum or egg white. Modern ink pens use dyes mixed with things like alcohol based polymers and anti clotting and drying agents so they last longer on the shelf and don't dry up. Unless pickup makers are using quill pens or buying specifically "india ink" pens for $$$ I assumed the discussion was about marking pickups with regular pens of today. Which, I suppose, may be different from what Fender used.?.
                        Leo was a simple guy ... and his early training was in accounting so he must have been up to date with office supplies.
                        "1940's up to date" of course.

                        I BET those stamps are just *regular* office type rubber stamps, (or best case metallic ones) plus *regular* (1940īs style) stamp pad ink.

                        I canīt imagine him searching for NASA type stuff.
                        If anything because NASA wouldnīt be invented until 20 years later
                        Juan Manuel Fahey

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