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4 pin 'Amphenol' to 3 pin 'XLR' adapter for Shure 545 microphone

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  • 4 pin 'Amphenol' to 3 pin 'XLR' adapter for Shure 545 microphone

    Hi all!
    I found a nice older Shure 545 (Series 2 - "pistol grip") microphone that needed some work, at a garage sale.
    One of the challenges is that I would like to find one of the adapters that Switchcraft used to make (#L3MN), that would adapt the 4 pin 'Amphenol' connector on the mic base to the now more standard 3 pin 'XLR'.
    It looks like Switchcraft doesn't make that L3MN adapter anymore, but I just thought I'd put out feelers to see if any of you have seen anything like that or may know of a good alternative?

    Thanks for your help and leads,
    Buck

  • #2
    So instead of an adaptor, just find the plug and wire it to a cord with an XLR on the other end.
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

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    • #3
      Enzo's idea is probably best. Even if you can find someone who still has an L3MN, it's probably going to be quite expensive since they are NLA.
      "Yeah, well, you know, that's just, like, your opinion, man."

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      • #4
        And if you do find an adaptor, then you have this 6-inch hunk of metal hanging off the end of the mic.
        Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

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        • #5
          Shure has this posted on their website:
          "Shure do not carry Amphenol connectors, but pre-wired cables are available from Tom Ellis - U.S. phone: 214-328-3225 or email: tellis@ellisandassoc.com "

          https://service.shure.com/s/article/...language=en_US

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Enzo View Post
            So instead of an adaptor, just find the plug and wire it to a cord with an XLR on the other end.
            I was made aware of the magic Switchcraft part a couple years ago and went on a hunt for a few - no dice. So good luck with that. For my 545's I have made cables as Enzo suggests.
            This isn't the future I signed up for.

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            • #7
              Main reason to change from that Amphenol connector is their poor strain relief (along with getting all your mics on the same XLR standard). I don't know how much of a market there is for some machinist to crank out the shell of the L3MN connector. Most of us have spare Switchcraft A3M connectors (or other panel mounts) to source the male insert for the adapter. I've never tried to see if I could cobble the Amphenol 4-pin connector into one.
              Last edited by nevetslab; 05-11-2022, 06:42 PM.
              Logic is an organized way of going wrong with confidence

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              • #8
                I had posted some images of that Switchcraft L3MN adapter for the Amphenol-based connector. I looked at some Switchcraft and Neutrik male connectors, and don't see anyway around having a machinist turn the connector body out to retrofit into that cavity meant for the amphenol part.

                https://music-electronics-forum.com/...tronics/51885-
                Logic is an organized way of going wrong with confidence

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                • #9
                  Just in case, I've attached the Switchcraft Data Sheet that provides the external dimensions of this L3MN Adapter. Between that, a Switchcraft A3M connector and it's male insert, the details for machining the part from round Brass stock should be feasible. The coupling collar would have to be obtained from an Amphenol 91-MC4F connector. Switchcraft provided a nicer one with the part when they were producing them.

                  Switchcraft L3MN Replacement 91-MC4F.pdf

                  Click image for larger version  Name:	Switchcraft L3MN Connector-1.jpg Views:	0 Size:	1.45 MB ID:	960202 Click image for larger version  Name:	Switchcraft L3MN Connector-2.jpg Views:	0 Size:	1.18 MB ID:	960204

                  Attached Files
                  Logic is an organized way of going wrong with confidence

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                  • #10
                    Thanks very much for the helpful replies!
                    I was wondering how the 4 pin side of the adapter connects to the amphenol female jack? Do those pins go directly into the amphenol female, or do you solder lead wires to the adapter and then to the mic side?
                    On the adapter itself, are the 4 pins directly connected to the 3 pins, sans wires, or is there wiring between the two? It's a very small area and was wondering if, like most audio adapters, it is just metal contacts on metal contacts?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by buck1107 View Post
                      Thanks very much for the helpful replies!
                      I was wondering how the 4 pin side of the adapter connects to the amphenol female jack? Do those pins go directly into the amphenol female, or do you solder lead wires to the adapter and then to the mic side?
                      On the adapter itself, are the 4 pins directly connected to the 3 pins, sans wires, or is there wiring between the two? It's a very small area and was wondering if, like most audio adapters, it is just metal contacts on metal contacts?
                      OH.....you disconnect the Amphenol 4-pin connector from your 545S mic, and select which xfmr tap of it's xfmr you're going to connect to the XLR Male connector in this L3MN adapter.

                      I've attached the Shure User Guide/Data Sheet for this 545/545S Mic, which has the internal wiring diagram.

                      us_pro_545_ug.pdf

                      Years ago, I had a few of these 545's, and swapped out the Amphenol connector with the L3MN adapters.


                      Last edited by nevetslab; 05-19-2022, 10:42 PM.
                      Logic is an organized way of going wrong with confidence

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I wish I could be of assistance, but from what I've seen, it seems like the others on this forum have beat me to all the possible suggestions.

                        I'm digging through this because I creeped your profile after finding your name in several threads on a Fender bass amp circa 90s, the M80. I bought one from goodwill store's app, gave about 95 dollars for it, and it had the distorted output you spoke of in several threads. I did like you said first, went to those particular transistors that are bent 90 degrees, and checked the solder joints. After less than 5 minutes with a soldering iron, I got them back fastened properly, and have you to thank for it. Before, it would only go up to 2 or 3 if the eq was set to zero before it sounded like a terrible distortion pedal. Now I no longer have the issues.

                        I apologize for semi-necro-ing this thread, but you deserve my thanks, and I wanted to let you know that even years after, your solution is still being found and put to use.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Cookar1992 View Post
                          I wish I could be of assistance, but from what I've seen, it seems like the others on this forum have beat me to all the possible suggestions.

                          I'm digging through this because I creeped your profile after finding your name in several threads on a Fender bass amp circa 90s, the M80. I bought one from goodwill store's app, gave about 95 dollars for it, and it had the distorted output you spoke of in several threads. I did like you said first, went to those particular transistors that are bent 90 degrees, and checked the solder joints. After less than 5 minutes with a soldering iron, I got them back fastened properly, and have you to thank for it. Before, it would only go up to 2 or 3 if the eq was set to zero before it sounded like a terrible distortion pedal. Now I no longer have the issues.

                          I apologize for semi-necro-ing this thread, but you deserve my thanks, and I wanted to let you know that even years after, your solution is still being found and put to use.
                          Hello! That's great news, and I'm glad that my post helped you out!
                          It almost seems to be a design/production flaw, in that the solder joints can be made very weak, if they are soldered before attaching to the heat sink (at the factory).
                          I remember it was amazing how loud and clean the amp was after hearing that distored sound for quite some time. The friend I fixed it for said it was "too loud" after I fixed it. LOL

                          I'm so glad that it's working!

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