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  • nevetslab
    replied
    Foredom Model 30 Depth Gauge for cut-off discs use

    Another treasure found at a local surplus store (Industrial Liquidators in Hawthorne, CA), I came back to the shop at BGW Systems, Inc with a Forerdom Model MMG Bench-Model high speed hand grinder system. Bought both a Model 30 hand piece, which has a Jacob's #0 Chuck, and a smaller #28 handpiece (which used collets like used in Dremel's), I was a happy camper. When an order of PCB's arrived where the vendor messed up on cutting the depth of the PCB, I wandered into the machine shop and, armed with a 1-1/8" Forstner Bit, I drilled a thru hole in a small block of maple, then added a couple holes where I threaded in a pair of #10-32 bushings, and cut to size some fish paper and rolled it up, I had a crude but well-adustable depth gauge to set the cut of the carborundum cut-off discs. Then, is was a matter of slicing off the excess PCB material, and finishing the edge with my carbide mill files.

    This simple depth gauge has seen a lot of use over the years. I've never had the funds nor the space for a proper milling machine, but have worked around the absence of it as needed.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	Model 30 Handpiece -Jacobs #0 Chuck.jpg
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Name:	Model 30 Handpiece mtgd in depth gauge-2.jpg
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Name:	Model 30 Handpiece mtgd in depth gauge-3.jpg
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Name:	Foredom Model MMG Bench Motor & Model 30.jpg
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    Last edited by nevetslab; 03-06-2020, 08:28 PM.

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  • nevetslab
    replied
    Dumore Drill Speeder for PCB hole drilling

    Early in my prototyping days, after taping up a PCB layout 2X on the light table (Bishop Graphics donuts, tape, Rubylithe film, frosted mylar base, taped down onto large transparent grid sheet on 0.1" grid @ 2X), I sent it out to be shot/reduced to 1:1 on clear film. Our engineering dept (BGW Systems, Inc) would drop it off at a PCB fabrication house out in the valley (on the way home for our chief engineer), where they'd do a print-and-etch (single-sided boards), and would have it ready to be picked up the following morning. All that was needed next was to spend the time at the drill press with the Dumore Drill Speeder chucked into its' Jacob chuck, and, armed with the marked up blue line of the PCB showing all the hole sizes via the hole size chart (A=0.031", B=0.041", C=0.055", D = 0.063, etc), I'd drill out the component holes. Always well stocked with carbide PCB Drills, all having 1/8" shanks. So, a morning's effort yielded a fresh 1st article PCB now drilled and ready to stuff and move onto the initial power-up phase.

    Obviously many more uses for these Dumore Model 17-011 Drill Speeder, but that's what I've always used it for.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	Dumore Model 17-011 Drill Speeder-1.jpg
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ID:	856923 Click image for larger version

Name:	Dumore Drill Speeder Mtd in Drill Press-1.jpg
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ID:	856924 Click image for larger version

Name:	Dumore Drill Speeder Mtd in Drill Press-2.jpg
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Size:	1.31 MB
ID:	856925
    Last edited by nevetslab; 03-06-2020, 09:45 PM.

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  • Helmholtz
    replied
    How much did it used to be?
    I bought mine at least 20 years ago, don't remember how much it was then. I'm sure I wouldn't have payed that much (+shipping +20% import).
    Mine also came with 2 blocks, one tapered for knobs and one non-tapered for pulling bushings. But open bottom stud bushings can be easily pulled (actually pushed out) by inserting something (e.g. wooden dowel) for bottoming against and using the original stud screws.
    Last edited by Helmholtz; 03-06-2020, 08:42 PM.

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  • g1
    replied
    Originally posted by Helmholtz View Post
    It has a sticker saying "Schatten Design/Canada".

    Just saw it got very expensive meanwhile: https://schatten-pickups.myshopify.c...le-puller-tool
    It's even $4 more ($68.95) at stew-mac. How much did it used to be?
    It does mention an extra 'heavy duty block' for pulling bridge studs, etc. Does yours have that? (not saying it justifies the price jump)

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  • Helmholtz
    replied
    It has a sticker saying "Schatten Design/Canada".

    Just saw it got very expensive meanwhile: https://schatten-pickups.myshopify.c...le-puller-tool

    Leave a comment:


  • nevetslab
    replied
    Originally posted by Helmholtz View Post
    I love my StewMac (guitar) knob puller. Won't mar the lacquer. New ones have a clear tube, even better.

    [ATTACH=CONFIG]57247[/ATTACH]
    That's one I've never seen before. Clever design!

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  • Helmholtz
    replied
    I love my StewMac (guitar) knob puller. Won't mar the lacquer. New ones have a clear tube, even better.

    Click image for larger version

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ID:	856915

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  • Enzo
    replied
    My friend was just thanking me for the pair of church keys I gave him for knob removal. I use the unpointed end to lever up the knob. But the key is to use two of them, one on either side. If I use one, it cocks teh knobs sideways so it can bind on the shaft. Two and the knob comes straight up.

    Click image for larger version

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ID:	856913

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  • nevetslab
    replied
    Originally posted by dmeek View Post
    Here's a late addition. I found this in a thrift store. It's for undoing canvas snaps on boats. also works great for pulling knobs.

    Called a "Top-Snapper"
    https://music-electronics-forum.com/...1&d=1583368231
    Nice tool for getting those stubborn push-on knobs off! I don't have anything of that shape in my tool chests, and really hate having to pry them off with a select bladed screwdriver, pivoting off the edge of the front panel. Looks like this tool has a second 'blade' as seen behind the RED end of the handle.

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  • dmeek
    replied
    Here's a late addition. I found this in a thrift store. It's for undoing canvas snaps on boats. also works great for pulling knobs.

    Called a "Top-Snapper"
    https://music-electronics-forum.com/...1&d=1583368231
    Attached Files

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  • g1
    replied
    Originally posted by olddawg View Post
    I still have a bunch of weird tools from my vcr days. Eccentricity gauges, head pullers, tentilometers... also have stuff for R to R and cassette tools and gauges, test tapes. Alignment discs.. etc.. It will all be tossed soon..
    You should try to sell the cassette stuff. I'm amazed at what some of the cassette multi-tracks are selling for these days, and it's tough to find proper test tools at any reasonable price.
    VCR stuff maybe not so much, but possibly for the ADAT crowd.

    Leave a comment:


  • olddawg
    replied
    I still have a bunch of weird tools from my vcr days. Eccentricity gauges, head pullers, tentilometers... also have stuff for R to R and cassette tools and gauges, test tapes. Alignment discs.. etc.. It will all be tossed soon..

    Leave a comment:


  • Enzo
    replied
    That identical Weldmuller stripper is sold here as a Paladin brand. I have had one for decades, and dearly love it.

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  • Helmholtz
    replied
    While this is my all time favorite self-adjusting wire stripper:
    Click image for larger version

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    ..nothing beats these (see post #30) with Teflon insulation:
    Click image for larger version

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ID:	856840

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  • nevetslab
    replied
    Stainless Steel Surgical Needle Nose Pliers

    I think I came upon these Stainless Steel Surgical Needle Nose Pliers at a TRW Radio Amateur's Technical Swap Meet decades ago, and picked them up for under $10. Overall length is a touch over 8", and they do come in really handy at times when the other larger needle nose pliers aren't quite up to the task at hand. I will confess they've pinched my skin every so often from being a little careless, but an excellent tool.

    Click image for larger version

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ID:	856830 Click image for larger version

Name:	Surgical Pliers-3.jpg
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ID:	856831

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