Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Help assess this selector switch - can it be repaired?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Help assess this selector switch - can it be repaired?

    I have an Adcom preamplifier with a problematic selector switch.

    If you look at the photo, the switch looks like it lost contact at some point and then it was crimped to restore contact, but now the switch has lost the positive feel that its neighbor has.

    Can this be restored? If so, where do I start?

    Otherwise, I am not sure where to start on matching an appropriate replacement?

    Thanks in advance, this is more of a home audio thing, but a lot of guitar amp gear has this positive feel selector, so perhaps this is a better place to seek help.




    Click image for larger version

Name:	InkedfrLI.jpg
Views:	97
Size:	936.2 KB
ID:	959437

  • #2
    I think for pots, the 'feel' is usually a function of the grease where the shaft passes through it's bushing.
    In this case you may be referring to the 'click' action, which may involve some kind of spring in a detent, which may be able to be re-tensioned.

    Can you clarify exactly what you mean by 'positive feel' ?
    "Everything is better with a tube. I have a customer with an all-tube pacemaker. His heartbeat is steady, reassuring and dependable, not like a modern heartbeat. And if it goes wrong he can fix it himself. You can't do that with SMD." - Mick Bailey

    Comment


    • #3
      If click action is the things look at the lower switch. Right next to the blob of solder see the small wheel nestled between two bumps. Now look at the upper switch. The bumps are there, and the springy ring that would hold the wheel, but...no wheel. The wheel and bumps are the indexing mechanism.

      Unless that wheel is rotated out of view.
      Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

      Comment


      • #4
        In cases like this one, my usual approach is to remove the switch from the PCB and carefully disassemble it. The goal, of course, is to look for obvious broken or missing parts. It is wise to take photos and make notes during the process. There is usually around a 50% chance to make a useful repair. That doesn't sound like great odds but if it is not working at all in it's current condition then it's worth a try.

        Comment

        Working...
        X