Results 1 to 33 of 33

Thread: vibrato speed not slow enuff

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    hawaii
    Posts
    113
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 0/0
    Given: 0/0

    vibrato speed not slow enuff

    awhile back I posted a question about my TR vibrato speed not being slow enuff... I think it was tom that told me what to do.
    I copied his reply but lost it I was searching the past post but can't find it...

    so I need to ask again; my twin reverb vibrato speed can't go any slower and I know it should be able to...
    even when I have it turned down all the way it's just not slow enough..
    I think tom's reply was that there is a way to check it and then how to make it slower...

    it's is almost slow enough but I know it suppose to go a little bit slower and it would be how I like it..
    so was there a adjustment I could make or do I need to buy a new part?

    thanks, popoahi

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  2. #2
    Old Timer soundguruman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    California
    Posts
    2,522
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 3/0
    Given: 0/0
    You have to find out which twin and post the schematic. There's too many different twin circuits.
    Yes there is a way to make it slower. You probably have to install a new part. It's not an adjustment...

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  3. #3
    Lifetime Member Enzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Lansing, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    30,659
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 587/1
    Given: 0/0
    The Fender tremolo oscillators all work the same. There are three caps in series from plate to grid on the trem oscillator triode. From the plate they are 0.02uf, 0.01uf, and 0.01uf. I find it easiest to simply raise the two 0.01uf caps to 0.02uf. You can either replace then, or jut put a second 0.01uf in parallel with the existing ones.

    You COULD instead raise the resistance of the two 1 meg resistors to ground, but most shops don;t have any resistors over 1 meg, but do have a selection of caps.

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

  4. #4
    Supporting Member Jazz P Bass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Wernersville, PA
    Posts
    12,362
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 111/0
    Given: 31/0
    There is a 'limiting' resistor dirrectly before the Speed control.
    Lower that value.
    Here is the RI schematic: http://support.fender.com/schematics..._schematic.pdf

    And further reading: The Valve Wizard- Tremolo Oscillator

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  5. #5
    Lifetime Member Enzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Lansing, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    30,659
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 587/1
    Given: 0/0
    Um, by removing that series resistor with the speed control, you lower the overall resistance there. Lower resistance means the RC circuits time out faster, which means faster trem.

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

  6. #6
    Supporting Member Jazz P Bass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Wernersville, PA
    Posts
    12,362
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 111/0
    Given: 31/0
    Ooops!

    Didn't read all the way through the Valve Wizards explanation.

    "The usual approach is to design the oscillator for a frequency that is midway between the highest and lowest desired frequency, then add a series limiting resistor to prevent the total shunt resistance being reduced to zero. Thus the frequency can then be varied both above and below the initial chosen frequency (increasing resistance causes decreasing frequency). It will usually be necessary to experiment with the value of this limiting resistor, in order to get the maximum range without oscillations actually stopping. The oscillator designs found in the classic amps use wildly varying component values, and were almost certainly chosen by experimentation rather than calculation."

    Would raising the resistor help at all?

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    Last edited by Jazz P Bass; 02-24-2014 at 05:49 PM.

  7. #7
    Lifetime Member Enzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Lansing, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    30,659
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 587/1
    Given: 0/0
    It might, it wouldn;t hurt anything to experiment. I find on the typical fender that slow is just not slow enough that I have to double those caps in size to get where i want to be. I am not sure raising that one resistor would be enough. I fear if we enlarge it enough to be effective it will the reduce the sweep range of the speed control. If I wanted to do it in the resistors, I don;t think I'd change that one, I'd change the two 1 meg guys. Change them to maybe 2.2M or 3.3M. I have a few of those in stock for the reverb mixing resistor in Fenders.

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    hawaii
    Posts
    113
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 0/0
    Given: 0/0
    posting a schematic for a particular year may be a problem.. when trying to date my amp it was discussed that it could be from 1970 to 1980?? swaying mostly to the 1980 model...
    so at this time I wouldn't be able to post the correct one.

    but I think it was tom who didn't mention a year but that there could be a adjustment or modification one could do to get it a little more slower?
    I cannot find his suggestion again....


    thank you

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    hawaii
    Posts
    113
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 0/0
    Given: 0/0
    hi Enzo,

    I don't have any schematics for my amp...and I'm not able to do these things myself since I don't know what you are talking about...
    I'm not a electronics guy if it was welding then maybe but I'm too much of a novice when it comes to electronics..

    so I would tell a amp tech what you suggest and have him do the work...and if you remember when trying to date my amp it was anywhere from a 1970 to a 1980's model,,,, with the 1980 year a stronger case... and I also don't know where to buy a schematics chart... can you tell me where to buy them from?

    I just want to slow the vibrato down a little bit more...it just isn't slow enough and I am resisting using a box....

    thanks, popoahi

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  10. #10
    Lifetime Member Enzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Lansing, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    30,659
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 587/1
    Given: 0/0
    You or your guy can look on the fender web site for schematics for older amps. You can also look here:
    Schematic Heaven. Where All Good Amp & Effect Designs Await Resurrection...

    And of course you can come back here and ask.


    meanwhile the Fender trem circuit has varied little in the last 50 years. The resistor numbers may change model to model, but the circuit is the same.

    ANy competent tech ought to be able to slow down a trem, but if not, tell him to increase the value of the feedback caps in the oscillator stage.

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    hawaii
    Posts
    113
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 0/0
    Given: 0/0
    I have my TR amp on now for at least 20 min. just sitting all hooked up to my guitar and a chorus box.. the reverb is on 7 and the vibrato is all the way down at the slowest possible speed..

    there's faint buzzing with a touch of slow vibrato (not slow enuff) but what puzzles me is this heartbeat sound??? sounds like distant indian drums or a heartbeat like- ONE,two, three, four...anyone think this might show me the way to approach slowing down the vibrato speed???

    popo

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  12. #12
    Lifetime Member Enzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Lansing, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    30,659
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 587/1
    Given: 0/0
    No, but it suggests turning the speed control on the chorus box to see if the heartbeat changes pace.

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    hawaii
    Posts
    113
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 0/0
    Given: 0/0
    thanks this info you provided is really helpful
    aloha, popoahi

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  14. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    hawaii
    Posts
    113
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 0/0
    Given: 0/0
    hi Enzo,
    yah I thought of the box so I took it out of the circuit.. but it didn't change the sound..
    I wonder if everyones TR totally silent when ON and just sitting with the guitar hooked up or is there always a humm or sound and if so what kind of sounds do people have...
    lol that would be interesting to see what everyones TR sound like fully warmed up and ON with the guitar hooked up and no effects box inline...???

    thanks, popoahi

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  15. #15
    Lifetime Member Enzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Lansing, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    30,659
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 587/1
    Given: 0/0
    Oh, some trems thump some and others might tick. it happens, and when it does we can usually cure it. lead dress being a common fix.

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

  16. #16
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Birmingham MI USA
    Posts
    8
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 0/0
    Given: 0/0

    Slowing down the Tremolo on a Twin Reverb

    Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
    The Fender tremolo oscillators all work the same. There are three caps in series from plate to grid on the trem oscillator triode. From the plate they are 0.02uf, 0.01uf, and 0.01uf. I find it easiest to simply raise the two 0.01uf caps to 0.02uf. You can either replace then, or jut put a second 0.01uf in parallel with the existing ones.
    I know this is an old thread, but this seems to be the solution to the too-fast tremolo on my '77 Twin Reverb. These are ceramic disk caps, right? And what voltage rating would I need to buy?

    Thanks,

    Alan

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  17. #17
    Tubewreck jmaf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    BSB-DF
    Posts
    1,336
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 20/0
    Given: 20/0
    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Lenhoff View Post
    I know this is an old thread, but this seems to be the solution to the too-fast tremolo on my '77 Twin Reverb. These are ceramic disk caps, right? And what voltage rating would I need to buy?

    Thanks,

    Alan
    They can be poliester or polietilene as well if you can't find higher voltage ceramic disks out there. Must be rated 600V or more.

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  18. #18
    Lifetime Member Enzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Lansing, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    30,659
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 587/1
    Given: 0/0
    I think ceramics work well, and they are cheap. This is only an oscillator, not the signal path, so there is no "tone" involved.

    They need to be of enough voltage to handle the circuit.

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

  19. #19
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Birmingham MI USA
    Posts
    8
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 0/0
    Given: 0/0
    Thank you both for the info. I see 1KV ceramics readily available, so I'll go with those.

    Alan

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  20. #20
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Birmingham MI USA
    Posts
    8
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 0/0
    Given: 0/0
    While I am experienced with replacing components in relatively low voltage solid state keyboard instruments, I have not worked on tube devices with high voltages before. On these caps in the tremolo circuit, do I need to be concerned about high voltages being present? (The amp is a 100 watt, 1977 Twin Reverb.)

    I realize that this may be a trigger for some of you to tell me I ought to take the amp to a tech. (And if so, I can stand hearing the truth. Better safe than sorry.) But maybe this isn't an issue in this part of the circuit?

    Any advice?

    Thanks!

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  21. #21
    don't forget the joker g1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Canada, somewhere north of Fargo
    Posts
    10,206
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 353/1
    Given: 692/0
    Discharge all the high voltage caps before doing any work in there. Double check that they are discharged with your voltmeter.

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    The voices in my head are idiots!

  22. #22
    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Chicago, USA
    Posts
    4,908
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 54/0
    Given: 0/0
    Wow, Necrothread. I was surprised to see SGM offering advice. For a minute there, I thought he was back!

    Enzo gives good advice. But there are still some variations in the Trem/vibrato circuits that would render invalid the rule that "they are all the same."

    The Tweed and Brown/Blonde circuits are notable exceptions. The Tweed circuits typically used bias-vary tremolo while some of the Brown-era circuits relied on a very complex quadrature-voltage phase-shifting vibrato that often gets called "tremolo." The statement that all Fender circuits are the same is largely true in the 763-type amps of the BF/SF era, where the circuits use the optoisolator bug. That said, there are still some smaller SF/BF circuits that still used the power tube bias method, rather than the opto bug, so those would be notable exceptions to the rule.

    If you're looking at an AB763 BF Twin or it's SF descendants, the circuits are going to be the same basic opto bug design.

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    "Stand back, I'm holding a calculator." - chinrest

    "I happen to have an original 1955 Stratocaster! The neck and body have been replaced with top quality Warmoth parts, I upgraded the hardware and put in custom, hand wound pickups. It's fabulous. There's nothing like that vintage tone or owning an original." - Chuck H

  23. #23
    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Chicago, USA
    Posts
    4,908
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 54/0
    Given: 0/0
    Wow, Necrothread. I was surprised to see SGM offering advice. For a minute there, I thought he was back!

    Enzo gives good advice. But there are still some variations in the Trem/vibrato circuits that would render invalid the rule that "they are all the same."

    The Tweed and Brown/Blonde circuits are notable exceptions. The Tweed circuits typically used bias-vary tremolo while some of the Brown-era circuits relied on a very complex quadrature-voltage phase-shifting vibrato that often gets called "tremolo." The statement that all Fender circuits are the same is largely true in the 763-type amps of the BF/SF era, where the circuits use the optoisolator bug. That said, there are still some smaller SF/BF circuits that still used the power tube bias method, rather than the opto bug, so those would be notable exceptions to the rule.

    If you're looking at an AB763 BF Twin or it's SF descendants, the circuits are going to be the same basic opto bug design. But I agree -- it always helps to post the schematic for the amp that you're asking about.

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    "Stand back, I'm holding a calculator." - chinrest

    "I happen to have an original 1955 Stratocaster! The neck and body have been replaced with top quality Warmoth parts, I upgraded the hardware and put in custom, hand wound pickups. It's fabulous. There's nothing like that vintage tone or owning an original." - Chuck H

  24. #24
    don't forget the joker g1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Canada, somewhere north of Fargo
    Posts
    10,206
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 353/1
    Given: 692/0
    I should clarify that where I said high voltage caps I meant the main filter caps in the power supply circuit. These are the ones that can hold a charge when the unit is turned off.

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    The voices in my head are idiots!

  25. #25
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Birmingham MI USA
    Posts
    8
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 0/0
    Given: 0/0
    Thanks everyone! The job is done, and the slower tremolo on my Twin Reverb sounds fabulous with my Fender Rhodes piano. (But you can still turn up the speed so it's fast enough to sound like a blur. It's a perfect range.)

    I worked VERY carefully on this because I'm not experienced in working on tube amps. I was going to buy -- or make -- a capacitor discharge tool. But then I saw a video online that indicated that my Silverface Twin has a bleeder circuit. So, I just verified with my meter that it worked properly: I turned on the amp long enough for it to fully warm up and be playable, noting that the positive ends of the filter caps were measuring about 370 volts. I switched the amp off (without touching the standby switch) and watched the voltage quickly drop to 6-7 volts. And after a minute or so, the voltage was less than one volt. That sounded safe enough to me. Added two 0.01uf 1KV caps in parallel with the existing 0.01 uf caps. (I did this rather than replacing the existing caps with higher value ones because I wanted to leave it evident that a mod had been done, in case I ever sell it.)

    If I've given any bad -- or unsafe -- advice here, I hope someone will correct me. (And I'll edit my post to make sure I don't lead anyone into electrocution.)

    Anyway, thanks again!

    Alan

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  26. #26
    don't forget the joker g1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Canada, somewhere north of Fargo
    Posts
    10,206
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 353/1
    Given: 692/0
    Well done and well thought out. That's how I discharge, use the amps own bleeders if possible (via standby switch in play position), then check and further discharge if necessary.
    Also like your thinking on the parallel caps to make the mod stand out and be easily returned to stock.

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    The voices in my head are idiots!

  27. #27
    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Chicago, USA
    Posts
    4,908
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 54/0
    Given: 0/0
    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Lenhoff View Post
    Thanks everyone! The job is done, and the slower tremolo on my Twin Reverb sounds fabulous with my Fender Rhodes piano.
    I'm guessing that you've got the 4-legged Stage model piano, right? Neoprene or felt tipped?

    I think those sound absolutely fabulous through a Twin Reverb.

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    "Stand back, I'm holding a calculator." - chinrest

    "I happen to have an original 1955 Stratocaster! The neck and body have been replaced with top quality Warmoth parts, I upgraded the hardware and put in custom, hand wound pickups. It's fabulous. There's nothing like that vintage tone or owning an original." - Chuck H

  28. #28
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Birmingham MI USA
    Posts
    8
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 0/0
    Given: 0/0
    Quote Originally Posted by g1 View Post
    Well done and well thought out. That's how I discharge.
    I am hardly a brilliant electronics person. But I take pride in being smart enough to know what I DON'T know. I try to overcome that by listening well, and working carefully and cautiously. (Come to think of that, I guess that's how you learn!)

    By the way, I just recently discovered this group, and I'm finding a lot of excellent and very helpful people here.

    Alan

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  29. #29
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Birmingham MI USA
    Posts
    8
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 0/0
    Given: 0/0
    Quote Originally Posted by bob p View Post
    I'm guessing that you've got the 4-legged Stage model piano, right? Neoprene or felt tipped?

    I think those sound absolutely fabulous through a Twin Reverb.
    Yes, I have a 1974 Stage with Neoprene tips that sounds great through my Twin. The Rhodes pianos varied considerably by year in tone, action and craftsmanship. '74 was an excellent year. You can see my baby here:

    https://vintagerockkeyboards.wordpress.com/

    Alan

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  30. #30
    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Chicago, USA
    Posts
    4,908
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 54/0
    Given: 0/0
    Nice. I remember when Rhodes came out the neoprene tipped Stage pianos. I was playing bass back then and our piano guy ended up buying the smaller 73 and playing it through a Super Twin Reverb. There was something special about the way he was able to get that Super Twin dialed in -- he used a combination of the masters and the EQ to add some subtle "bite" to the Rhodes tone, keeping it clear but on-edge no matter what sort of volume level we played at. He had to trade away the tremolo feature of the standard TR to get that, so he bought an MXR phaser to fill that niche. Phasors were the big deal at the time -- and "Just the Way You Are" was a popular cover back in '77.

    I see that you have a D6 Clavinet. I've always loved the sound of those.

    And I see that you're using a 490. I'm wondering if you've given any thought to using the ST for your piano collection, stretch tuning and all.

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    "Stand back, I'm holding a calculator." - chinrest

    "I happen to have an original 1955 Stratocaster! The neck and body have been replaced with top quality Warmoth parts, I upgraded the hardware and put in custom, hand wound pickups. It's fabulous. There's nothing like that vintage tone or owning an original." - Chuck H

  31. #31
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Birmingham MI USA
    Posts
    8
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 0/0
    Given: 0/0
    Oh, don't get me started! I could talk all day about vintage keys. (Actually, I can write about them all day, too. A co-author and I will be publishing a book next year that's a tribute to the great rock keyboards of the 1950s through early 1980s. Large format, full of gorgeous studio photos and what we hope will be regarded as the authoritative story of these instruments.)

    I used to play the Rhodes with a Small Stone phaser. But I'm not really into that '70s/'80s pop kind of sound. To me, tremolo is the defining Rhodes sound. Clavinets are being re-born because you can finally buy the "consumable" parts for them. (Strings, hammer tips, etc.) There was a long time when those parts were totally unavailable, and lots of Clavs got scrapped because their hammer tips had decayed into a gooey, stick mess. A real shame.

    I'm not sure I know anyone who stretch tunes a Wurli. I'd say the overwhelming majority of Rhodes players do not stretch tune their pianos. Rhodes shipped them without stretch tuning, but at some point added a stretch tuning chart to the Rhodes service manual in case that was your preference. To me, a Rhodes sounds out of tune when it's stretch-tuned. But I might think differently if I were in a band in which I was playing a Rhodes along with an acoustic piano that's stretched. I'm told by a tech who works for Donald Fagen (Steely Dan) that Donald wants his stretch-tuned for that reason.

    Alan

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  32. #32
    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Chicago, USA
    Posts
    4,908
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 54/0
    Given: 0/0
    That sounds like a very interesting book. Keep us posted!

    I agree, the sound of a phasor on a Rhodes is great (I'm not a Joel fan, but he got a lot of miles out of it), but the phasor is something that can grow old quickly. That said, there is no substitute for that tone. To my ears at least, that's one of the classic Rhodes sounds. I guess you can tell that I really like the sound of a real Rhodes. Are there any modern keyboards that even come close? I'm not familiar enough with modern keyboards to really know. To me the Rhodes models don't quite sound the same.

    It's interesting that people are not stretching their electric keyboards. I can see the rationale for not doing that when they're being played alone, or beside other keyboards that aren't stretched, like a Hammond organ. But if they're being played beside a concert grand I don't see how you could get away without doing it. Interesting comment about Fagen. Did not know that.

    Thanks.

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    "Stand back, I'm holding a calculator." - chinrest

    "I happen to have an original 1955 Stratocaster! The neck and body have been replaced with top quality Warmoth parts, I upgraded the hardware and put in custom, hand wound pickups. It's fabulous. There's nothing like that vintage tone or owning an original." - Chuck H

  33. #33
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Birmingham MI USA
    Posts
    8
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 0/0
    Given: 0/0
    Quote Originally Posted by bob p View Post
    That sounds like a very interesting book. Keep us posted!
    Will do. It should be available in fall 2019. (If anyone wants to be notified when it publishes, send me a PM with your email address.)

    I don't think any of the digital Rhodes emulations fully capture the sound of the original -- and certainly not their feel. But for gigging, they are a godsend for their portability. And in the mix of a band, they can sound quite good. If you want to explore the possibilities, you might want to visit a music store that stocks Nords or maybe Korg's SV-1. Another issue is that you get one keyboard that makes many sounds. So you may be playing pianos on a Hammond-like keyboard or organs on weighted piano-style keys. It's not ideal, but the convenience helps many people learn to tolerate it.

    Alan

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. SF Twin Reverb Vibrato Hum on Speed Pot??
    By marcumh in forum Maintenance, Troubleshooting & Repair
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 05-03-2013, 04:11 PM
  2. Sozo Amplification / Slow ?
    By Amp Kat in forum Maintenance, Troubleshooting & Repair
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 05-11-2011, 11:12 AM
  3. Anyone else have a slow august for repairs?
    By AudioWorks in forum Maintenance, Troubleshooting & Repair
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 09-10-2010, 03:09 PM
  4. Why is this entire website so slow?
    By head_spaz in forum Fun with computers
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 07-30-2009, 06:07 AM
  5. Ampeg B4 R slow power up anyone see this before?
    By Garydean in forum Maintenance, Troubleshooting & Repair
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03-13-2009, 06:35 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •