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Thread: Meanwhile in Las Vegas...

  1. #71
    Supporting Member John_H's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Dude View Post
    I love it when I hear people from Las Vegas say it's cold.
    Ha! Maybe I am a little thin blooded, but my garage is pretty drafty, and when the wind is blowing my little propane heater can't keep up. I'm sure it's a little humorous to all of my friends in the GWN, similar to when I hear those in colder climates complain of heat, but as much as I enjoy working on the gear, It's no fun when I'm uncomfortable.

    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck H View Post
    Well remember that Las Vegas is in a desert. It actually can get cold there (though mid 40's isn't that cold). The coldest I ever felt was in Flagstaff Arizona. The temp was exactly zero Fahrenheit, but the humidity was very low so the moment you went out it felt like all the water in your skin was sublimating as you freeze dried. My breath was crystallizing and falling in tiny flakes. It had to be the low humidity, but it was oddly, bitingly cold feeling.
    Usually when it's cold here in Vegas, the humidity is very low, so we don't see much snow. Last Wednesday we had the most significant snow event in almost thirty years. Some parts of the Las Vegas valley had well over a foot. A few inches fell at my house in the center of town. It was very surreal seeing my neighborhood covered.

    Quote Originally Posted by Justin Thomas View Post
    Something I've had to tell some of my housies about those "Polar Vortex" days & nights in the northeast. Please, be sure to drink a lot of water. You don't realize how much you lose when it's 2° out, the wind is 20-30mph, & humidity in the 30-40% range. A lot of them (there are 32 of us this year) are from So-Cal, Florida, Hawaii, had a Bolivian & a Filipino... But tgey think they're okay cuz they're not sweating...

    I remember in fall when most of rhem were saying how cold it was & how miserable when it got down to 45°. I just kept telling them "just wait. It gets better." Not that this thread need be a urination competition about our weather, cuz I already know G1, Dude, & Enzo win that one; just shooting crap. And yes, it DOES get cold in the desert. But that's better than 115° in the shade.
    It's easy to become dehydrated here at any time of the year, but you're right about how easy it is to be unaware in cold weather. During July, and August it will get over 110 degrees a few times. The official record for Las Vegas is 117*, but that's at the airport downtown. Many parts of the valley exceed that frequently. There's also a theory that the Chamber of Commerce has a special thermometer designed to not scare tourists. I'm getting older, and the heat affects me more than it used to. I'll still take 105* over 25* any day though.

    Quote Originally Posted by DrGonz78 View Post
    Last Thursday it snowed in parts of north Scottsdale and it was like 45 degrees most of the day. For us that's about as cold as it gets. A week later it's a high temperature of 75. Chuck has it right with the dry cold nights in Arizona. I don't think I could handle the REAL cold and that damn polar vortex.
    I lived in Scottsdale in the mid 70's. Those were some wild times. Arizona does have exciting weather. In '77 it flooded so bad that it destroyed all of the bridges crossing the Salt River, except for one half of the Interstate 10. I was working in Chandler at the time. The commute afterwards was nearly impossible. I thought at the time that it deserved a special edition of "Arizona Highways". I have a lot of friends in AZ. I was sent this photo last week. A satellite image showing two thirds of your state covered in snow.

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  2. #72
    Supporting Member John_H's Avatar
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    I haven't built many single-cut guitars, but for the last one I made a jig, and matching template for the neck mortise. It worked really well, and this will be the first occasion to use it since then. Both the jig, and the body template have the angle built in. I didn't look at anyone Else's design, but instead envisioned on doing it this way before I had the chance. I dig making my own jigs. I have many that are made from the simplest of materials like this one, but are very accurate. I'll need it for both of these guitars.

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    I put a lot of thought into the cutaway on this guitar. It is after all for me. I looked at several examples. I found that many of my favorites shared a similarity. The cutaway, and the return to the body had a symmetry to them. Like the letter S, but not exaggerated. I used this concept, and oriented the 'S' vertically. I sketched it a few times until I found a balance that liked. I like doing full scale layouts. On this one, it really helped. I already had the templates, so it was easy. This is with a 22 fret neck joining at the 16th fret. (like a les paul) I plan to use a vintage Nashville T-O-M that I have with a traditional tailpiece. I drew in the area that will be chambered. I'll trim it with single ply black binding. I'm working on an idea for some custom humbucker surrounds coordinated with a floating pick guard reminiscent of a late 50's National. I'm not committed to anything, but I like a subtle art deco vibe.

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    Last edited by John_H; 03-04-2019 at 09:45 PM. Reason: I fixed the pictures of the neck jig

  3. #73
    Supporting Member John_H's Avatar
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    I made some good progress this weekend. The necks are done as far as I'll go until I mount them to the bodies. On mine, I'm going to contour the transition.

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  4. #74
    Old Timer Leo_Gnardo's Avatar
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    Right on - take the dusty work outdoors! Dig the darlington schemo T shirt too.

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    Enjoy. Every. Sandwich.

  5. #75
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    I plan to use a vintage Nashville T-O-M that I have with a traditional tailpiece.
    Just a personal opinion:

    Having owned (still have a few) and played many Gibson LPs, I always preferred the ones with the ABR-1 bridge over the Nashville T-O-M. The ABR seems to couple better with the wood and produces a fuller (woodier?) less metallic sound. Its threaded studs are in direct contact with the top, while the Nashville is suspended on metal inserts that don't couple very well.
    Also I don't like the pot metal saddles of the Nashville.

    I tried locking bridges but found that they neither improve sound nor sustain.

    One of the best sounding ABR bridges is the Gibson Historic part. But the Allparts version compares very well.

    Unfortunately the ABR design depends on tight tolerances (press fit of saddles) of its components and sometimes you may find a rattling saddle. Gibson also sells the (unnotched) saddles separately and I always keep some spares.

    I also prefer a lightweight aluminum stop-tailpiece.

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    Last edited by Helmholtz; 03-04-2019 at 05:19 PM.
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  6. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leo_Gnardo View Post
    Right on - take the dusty work outdoors! Dig the darlington schemo T shirt too.
    Looks like a Fuzzface circuit to me.

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  7. #77
    Old Timer Leo_Gnardo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Helmholtz View Post
    Looks like a Fuzzface circuit to me.
    Could be that. I'm sure John will enlighten us soon enough. Cascaded transistors - lots 'o gain. Make mine germanium!

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    Enjoy. Every. Sandwich.

  8. #78
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    Make mine germanium!
    They are! Looks like AC128s.

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  9. #79
    Don't forget the joker g1's Avatar
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    What happened to the snow? A place where cold means not being able to wear shorts?

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    Just because they don't have tubes doesn't mean they don't have feelings! - glebert

  10. #80
    Supporting Member John_H's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leo_Gnardo View Post
    Right on - take the dusty work outdoors! Dig the darlington schemo T shirt too.
    I used to have a dedicated workshop. My space is very limited anymore. All of the woodwork is done outside. I have my stationary tools under a covered patio, and the dozens of other power tools are stored in totes. It's a pain sometimes, but is what it is.

    Quote Originally Posted by Helmholtz View Post
    Just a personal opinion:

    Having owned (still have a few) and played many Gibson LPs, I always preferred the ones with the ABR-1 bridge over the Nashville T-O-M. The ABR seems to couple better with the wood and produces a fuller (woodier?) less metallic sound. Its threaded studs are in direct contact with the top, while the Nashville is suspended on metal inserts that don't couple very well.
    Also I don't like the pot metal saddles of the Nashville.

    I tried locking bridges but found that they neither improve sound nor sustain.

    One of the best sounding ABR bridges is the Gibson Historic part. But the Allparts version compares very well.

    Unfortunately the ABR design depends on tight tolerances (press fit of saddles) of its components and sometimes you may find a rattling saddle. Gibson also sells the (unnotched) saddles separately and I always keep some spares.

    I also prefer a lightweight aluminum stop-tailpiece.
    Good points. I set aside the Nashville T-O-M because I originally intended to string it through the body. They're thinner and better suited. That's no longer my intention though. I'll look through my stuff. I have a bunch of bridges.

    Quote Originally Posted by Helmholtz View Post
    Looks like a Fuzzface circuit to me.
    Quote Originally Posted by Leo
    Could be that. I'm sure John will enlighten us soon enough. Cascaded transistors - lots 'o gain. Make mine germanium!
    Quote Originally Posted by Helmholtz View Post
    They are! Looks like AC128s.
    It's a Fuzz Face. Only a true gear head will recognize this shirt. Fuzz pedals are my newest obsession. The shirt fits literally, and figuratively.

    Quote Originally Posted by g1 View Post
    What happened to the snow? A place where cold means not being able to wear shorts?
    A week later it was in the 70's. From now on, You keep your weather up there where it belongs.

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  11. #81
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    I set aside the Nashville T-O-M because I originally intended to string it through the body.
    I think if the string height at the bridge (depending on neck angle) is not too low, an ABR-1 with a stop tailpiece is the better solution. Also a stop-tailpiece allows to vary the string kink angle at the bridge, which influences sound and feel.

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  12. #82
    Supporting Member John_H's Avatar
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    I sorted through the 25 or so T-O-M's in my parts collection. Three of them were vintage wired abr-1's. One of them has new saddles. I've got 7 brand new BR-EG asian bridges that Ibanez used about 15 years ago. Most of these came from an estate sale a few years ago.

    I also found a new aluminum wireless Gotoh ABR replacement in the pile.

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  13. #83
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    Looks similar to my bridges collection. I would go for the vintage wired abr-1. Some people complain about wire rattling, but I found that a little bending prevents this. Actually the wire is a useful thing, as it prevents saddles from falling off.

    Original abr-1 saddles are made from machined brass (and nickel plated). I even experimented with titanium saddles but didn't like the sound.
    Asian bridges often have cheap cast zinc alloy saddles. And I prefer to file my own notches for best string spacing/alignment and sound. So I tend to avoid pre-notched saddles.
    Also the stud spacings may not be compatible even if bridges look alike.

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    Last edited by Helmholtz; 03-05-2019 at 03:51 PM.
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  14. #84
    Bent Member Chuck H's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Helmholtz View Post
    Looks similar to my bridges collection. I would go for the vintage wired abr-1. Some people complain about wire rattling, but I found that a little bending prevents this. Actually the wire is a useful thing, as it prevents saddles from falling off.

    Original abr-1 saddles are made from machined brass (and nickel plated). I even experimented with titanium saddles but didn't like the sound.
    Asian bridges often have cheap cast zinc alloy saddles. And I prefer to file my own notches for best string spacing/alignment and sound. So I tend to avoid pre-notched saddles.
    Also the stud spacings may not be compatible even if bridges look alike.
    I just want to say that your dedication to the craft as it applies to this genre is and has been a great new asset to this forum. And that I've tried to offer rep points to your profile at many opportunities, but the forum keeps telling me I have "spread some reputation points around" before allowing me to give more to you Just know that I would and you deserve them.

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    "...less ear-friendly but handy for jazz." Leo_Gnardo

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  15. #85
    Supporting Member John_H's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Helmholtz View Post
    Looks similar to my bridges collection. I would go for the vintage wired abr-1. Some people complain about wire rattling, but I found that a little bending prevents this. Actually the wire is a useful thing, as it prevents saddles from falling off.
    I'm not worried about the wire. Like you said, It's not hard to fix a rattle. I have a very large collection of used guitar parts. Much more than I will ever use, but when doing repairs, or building something for myself, it's nice to have the stockpile. My jaw hit the floor when I saw what the vintage bridges were selling for on ebay. I've got everthing I need, but I'll need to buy a stop-tail for this guitar. I don't like any of the ones that I have. I too prefer aluminum.
    Original abr-1 saddles are made from machined brass (and nickel plated). I even experimented with titanium saddles but didn't like the sound.
    I know what you mean! I tried some graphite saddles once, and that didn't last long.
    Asian bridges often have cheap cast zinc alloy saddles. And I prefer to file my own notches for best string spacing/alignment and sound. So I tend to avoid pre-notched saddles.
    Also the stud spacings may not be compatible even if bridges look alike.
    The only thing that isn't zinc on these Asian bridges that I have is the screws, and wire. I don't like zinc parts, and avoid them when I can. The spacing on the vintage gibson ABR-1's that I have is 73.8 mm. The Gotoh, a tone pros, and the Asian bridges are all 74. The 4 Schaller Nashville bridges are 74.3 I didn't bother measuring the cheap stuff with the 8mm posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck H View Post
    I just want to say that your dedication to the craft as it applies to this genre is and has been a great new asset to this forum. And that I've tried to offer rep points to your profile at many opportunities, but the forum keeps telling me I have "spread some reputation points around" before allowing me to give more to you Just know that I would and you deserve them.
    I agree Chuck, Hr. Helmholtz has been an amazing asset to the forum. I recognized this, and began to follow his posts when he first arrived.

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  16. #86
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    I've got everthing I need, but I'll need to buy a stop-tail for this guitar. I don't like any of the ones that I have. I too prefer aluminum.
    Gotoh makes one of the nicest. The dimensional quality of many other makes (including the Gibson historic part) is inconsistent.

    I tried some graphite saddles once, and that didn't last long.
    Same with me. Tried the GraphTec sadlles, but found them to dull the sound.


    Thanks for appreciation!

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  17. #87
    Supporting Member John_H's Avatar
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    I haven't had a Telecaster for a few years. Neither has my guitar building buddy. A couple of weeks ago we were lamenting this problem, and decided to build a couple. I've got a few stewmac neck blanks, pre-slotted fingerboards, and dual acting truss rods that came from a local friend who decided that building guitars was more difficult than assembling them, and gave it up. I made up a pair of 2 piece alder bodies for them. I had a nice plank to work with, very stable with uniform grain, and not very heavy.

    Sure, it would be easier to build a partscaster, or just buy a tele, but I'd rather have one that's mine. For the most part it will be a spec tele. 50's style double bound Shell Pink. Maple fretboard. Most of the parts showed up in the last couple of days. I've ordered a bare fender american three saddle bridge, and some compensated saddles to go along. The new fender elite tele's have a curved neck plate. I splurged and bought the genuine article for this one. I'll flip the control plate. I had my last tele like that, and liked it. I've got pickup parts on hand. I'll wind a set when the time comes.

    The two alder tele blanks, and the mahogany all needed to be surfaced. I've got a nice surface planer that will cut 13" wide, but choose to use a router sled. A surface planer because of the close proximity of the feed rollers will not take a slight twist out of a piece of wood. On the other hand, a router sled allows you to mill one perfectly flat surface, then turn it over to machine other side. The finished product is flat, and uniform in thickness. This weekend I hope to rout the body cavity on the mahogany, and get all three cut out on the band saw.

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