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    Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
    If there is god, he doesn't have to play by rules.
    Not only does he play dice. He sometimes throws them where you can't see them. (Stephen Hawking)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
    I appreciate all the thoughts about communicating and so on, but those are arguments for teaching clear writing. Teaching someone to print clearly does the job just as easily as teaching them cursive. I hand write with a flowing print. It won't pass muster as cursive, but it is readable, and that is what counts. I was taught that cursive was to be done not lifting the pen during a word. I don't find that requirement useful to speed up my writing. I forget the name of the cursive we learned, but I do recall there was a competing form called the Palmer Method. Palmer was rounder and "prettier". The girls were especially good at it.
    A fair point. Of course, penmanship in general seems to be underserved by contemporary curriculum.

    When I was teaching university in 1990, students would hand in handwritten assignments. It was a student demographic that tended to preclude personal ownership of word-processing equipment, and perhaps even a simple typewriter.Each submission was reasonably legible. The only problem was that every student had a different handwriting style, such that grading involved spending a bit of time learning to decode each style from each student. It was draining, because you had to devote effort to figuring out what the words were before you could get to the deeper ideas. So I photocopied a bit of every student's submission, made a collage, and taped it to my office door as an illustration of why I would prefer typed assignments from now on.

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    Bent Member Chuck H's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave H View Post
    That isn't in line with current thinking. The idea of a totally deterministic universe had to be abandoned with the advent of quantum mechanics. It's one of the few times Einstein was proved wrong. It seems that God really does play dice.
    I don't know about quantum mechanics. But it does seem to me that if the bang happened again under the EXACT same circumstances that everything would end up exactly the same. Just like any other repeatable experiment proving a theory. You put the pieces in place and set it off. The reactions, physical and chemical, occur relative to other forces around them unto the end of the reaction. (<period) At least that's what makes sense to "me". Even if through a perfect understanding of quantum mechanics we were to learn how to bend time and alter what has gone before, it was going to happen. You, now, defending the ideal that you are capable of controlling your own destiny. Also part of the ongoing reaction. You have no choice but to believe you have a choice.

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    So, unrelated to Enzo's initial post, but in keeping with the nostalgic theme, are there any license-plate slogans people remember, that might not be used any more? I find they generally tend to persist over the decades, but I imagine there might be some that sounded okay at the time, and later made someone say "Um, I don't think so".

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    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    If there is god, he doesn't have to play by rules.
    If there is God, you can bet that he capitalizes his name.

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    "Stand back, I'm holding a calculator." - chinrest

    "I happen to have an original 1955 Stratocaster! The neck and body have been replaced with top quality Warmoth parts, I upgraded the hardware and put in custom, hand wound pickups. It's fabulous. There's nothing like that vintage tone or owning an original." - Chuck H

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    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    I remember using typewriters to create documents and to complete forms. And using a stack of index cards as an analog word processor, because digital word processing wasn't yet available.

    Back in the old days we used to write "papers" by hand on stacks of index cards. You'd write one paragraph per card, and you'd shuffle and replace the cards as you re-wrote your paper. A re-write involved recopying a card and replacing it in the stack. When the paper was finalized, then you got to type it all up, or send it to a typist. When we wrote something up for publication we'd submit typed documents and artwork, then the publishing house would do the final typesetting and send us oversized "galley proofs" for final approval before the journal went to press.

    It was a big thing when word processors came along. At the university lab I remember everyone in the building had to share a giant rack-mounted unit that used a modified IBM electric typewriter for input/output and a huge round CRT that looked like an air traffic controller's radar display. It ran on a DEC PDP "minicomputer" and stored data on magnetic tape. If you wanted a hard copy back-up, you "printed" contents of the tape onto binary punch cards or made a duplicate tape. A large program or document could use a stack of cards that spanned several two-foot long boxes. I wrote my thesis on one of those huge rack mounted word processing systems. In the spirit of letting no ridiculously expensive computer resource go to waste, we used to kill time playing Spacewar! on the word processor.

    By the 70s the technology had advanced a lot -- instead of using only tape drives, IBM had developed hard disks. The drive unit was the size of a washing machine, and huge removable disks were stored in clear cake boxes like you'd see in a restaurant. My dad was an MIS guy back then for one of the biggest companies in America. The computer room had rows of spinning tape machines and those washing-machine disk drives, as far as the eye could see. They covered an entire floor in a Chicago office building. He had a room full of employees whose full time job was to keypunch data into punch cards. Another guy had a full time job pushing a cart full of 2" magnetic tapes from the library on one floor to the computer room on another floor. Back then there was no Internet and "network connectivity" meant that twice a day someone would drive a station wagon full of magnetic tapes from Chicago to the East Coast, while another team of drivers drove tapes from the East Coast to Chicago.

    I remember the 8" floppy disk being a game changer because it could fit into a notebook or a briefcase.

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    Last edited by bob p; 04-09-2018 at 05:16 PM.
    "Stand back, I'm holding a calculator." - chinrest

    "I happen to have an original 1955 Stratocaster! The neck and body have been replaced with top quality Warmoth parts, I upgraded the hardware and put in custom, hand wound pickups. It's fabulous. There's nothing like that vintage tone or owning an original." - Chuck H

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Hammer View Post
    So, unrelated to Enzo's initial post, but in keeping with the nostalgic theme, are there any license-plate slogans people remember, that might not be used any more? I find they generally tend to persist over the decades, but I imagine there might be some that sounded okay at the time, and later made someone say "Um, I don't think so".
    Yeah - "You've Got A Friend In Pennsylavania!" The way they drive up there isn't just aggressive, it's just downright RUDE. Totally unconvincing for you to tell me I have a friend, when you're insistent on being as rude and inconsiderate on the road as possible. Anyway, no longer available...

    Justin

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    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    "Land of Lincoln" is on all of the IL licence plates, even though Lincoln was born in Kentucky and grew up in Indiana. How IL lays claim to him doesn't make much sense, other than he practiced law there and served in the IL Militia for 3 months.

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    "Stand back, I'm holding a calculator." - chinrest

    "I happen to have an original 1955 Stratocaster! The neck and body have been replaced with top quality Warmoth parts, I upgraded the hardware and put in custom, hand wound pickups. It's fabulous. There's nothing like that vintage tone or owning an original." - Chuck H

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    I gather the original slogan was with reference to Quakers, colloquially known as "Friends".

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    For a while Indiana's said "Wander Indiana", an invitation to explore. However once the car dealer hung his border thing on there, all you saw was "Wander". Just seemed strange.

    If there is God, you can bet that he capitalizes his name.
    She may chose not to, just as does one bob p.


    Chuck, wanting it all to happen exactly the same is appealing, but I think the only given would be the results would necessarily be CONSISTENT with the premise, but not necessarily identical. Quantum bits are random. In this universe, one quark was up, but in the next it comes out down. That makes some proton a neutron, making an atom...

    There is nothing special about my handwriting, but it doesn't look like anyone else's. And I went through all the penmanship training as did the rest of my age group. I got a grade for penmanship on my report card. I recall it being the lowest of my grades. You can teach math and geography, but you can't teach dexterity.

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    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    here you go:

    Wander Indiana


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    "Stand back, I'm holding a calculator." - chinrest

    "I happen to have an original 1955 Stratocaster! The neck and body have been replaced with top quality Warmoth parts, I upgraded the hardware and put in custom, hand wound pickups. It's fabulous. There's nothing like that vintage tone or owning an original." - Chuck H

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    Lifetime Member Enzo's Avatar
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    Driving...yikes.

    I used to be field service guy, and I flew all over the country with my tool box. I grew up in Washington DC where I drove a cab, but I detected driving styles. IN DC we had the DC lane change. A car pulls halfway into your lane, but keeps his spot in the old lane. That way he can finish into whichever lane moved next. Just like politicians.

    Up in New Jersey, the GArden State, seriously, they did the Jersey Yield. You are driving down a commercial street. Some guy exiting a store parking lot pulls the nose of his car halfway out into a lane. You either have to screech to a stop and let him in, or you have to swerve over into the next lane to avoid him.

    In New York City, it is pure dodge-em cars. They are all going manically from point A to point B as fast as possible, with only passing regard to traffic laws. Understand that, and drive with them, and you are OK.

    Then I got to Boston. They drive with the same abandon as in NYC, but without the purpose. They just drive around like nuts all the time everywhere. They call traffic circles "rotaries" there. And you see signs that say "Rotary traffic ahead". First time I saw that sign, I assumed we would be coming up on an intersection full of spinning cars.

    I recall working with some guys in Boston, preparing for an install in New Hampshire. The Boston buys warned me that the New Hampshire guys had these thick accents and were hard to understand. Really?

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    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    we have what's known as the "Chicago Turn Signal", which means that you put on the blinker just as you start turning the wheel to change lanes. Better late than never.

    There's guttersniping, where if you leave a car length in front of you someone else decides to fill it to get ahead, and you just get pushed back another car length. So you have to choose between following at a safe distance and getting pushed back in traffic, or driving on the other guy's bumper to hold your place in traffic. If necessary people behind you will use the shoulder to take that spot in front of you.

    There's push-parking, where if someone doesn't leave you enough room to park your car, or to get out of your parking space, you just use your car to push them back far enough to let you get in/out. If you park your car in a non-reserved space on the street you can expect the bumpers to be bashed in, even if your car is brand new.

    In the winter time people claim "Dibbs" on street parking spaces. They put chairs and tables and all sorts of appliance on the street to reserve their parking place. They figure if they shoveled out a space on the street then it's their private space until spring thaw. I once saw someone use a life-size nativity scene to hold their spot, with Mary, Joseph and Baby Jesus guarding their parking space. In Chicago everyone knows that "Jesus Saves."

    And then we have the worst of all Chicago driving habits, gridlocking. People will enter an intersection without bothering to make sure they have an exit. The result is that when the traffic doesn't move and light changes, they get the red light and end up sitting in the middle of the intersection blocking the flow of traffic that has the green light. The grid is locked, and everyone just sits there until they get the green light again. It's an unwritten rule that if you do this through two red lights, bullets may start flying.

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    Last edited by bob p; 04-09-2018 at 07:33 PM.
    "Stand back, I'm holding a calculator." - chinrest

    "I happen to have an original 1955 Stratocaster! The neck and body have been replaced with top quality Warmoth parts, I upgraded the hardware and put in custom, hand wound pickups. It's fabulous. There's nothing like that vintage tone or owning an original." - Chuck H

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    Lifetime Member Enzo's Avatar
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    Contrasting California, where you put your turn signal on about 5 miles ahead of a lane change, or face the wrath of traffic.

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    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    If you're on The 5 and you put your turn signal on 5 miles ahead, then that means that it's on for at least an hour.

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    "Stand back, I'm holding a calculator." - chinrest

    "I happen to have an original 1955 Stratocaster! The neck and body have been replaced with top quality Warmoth parts, I upgraded the hardware and put in custom, hand wound pickups. It's fabulous. There's nothing like that vintage tone or owning an original." - Chuck H

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    Bent Member Chuck H's Avatar
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    Oh contraire re: California turn signal use... In the bay area it's much more typical to do the "Chicago turn signal" Bob described. Daring to do otherwise will invariably result in someone either jumping up to fill the gap, because they know you want it and it would mean THEY would end up one car length further back (unacceptable) or someone else will grab it from the opposite lane. A gap that a whole car can fit into doesn't last long on a bay area highway or freeway. Telling someone you want it (like using your turn signal) is like putting up a sight that says "FREE REAL ESTATE".

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    "...less ear-friendly but handy for jazz." Leo_Gnardo

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    Lifetime Member Enzo's Avatar
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    1960 election. JFK versus Nixon. I took a page from my folks and worked for Nixon. Nixon and Henry Cabot Lodge. "Experience counts". What did I know. My mom was scared to death by JFK, he's a CATHOLIC!!! Elect him and we'd be having mass in the schools, we'd all have to turn catholic, etc etc etc. They hated Nixon, but geez, we can't have a catholic president after all.

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    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    God -- she likes it when you capitalize the names of religions.

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    "Stand back, I'm holding a calculator." - chinrest

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    Lifetime Member Enzo's Avatar
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    Whatever "God" might be, as far as I know, the reference manual is mute on the subject of capitalization. It mentions honoring parents, not killing or stealing, and some others, like not eating cheeseburgers. But I don;t see capitalization.

    For now, god is one among many.

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    Old Timer J M Fahey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
    Whatever "God" might be, as far as I know, the reference manual is mute on the subject of capitalization. It mentions honoring parents, not killing or stealing, and some others, like not eating cheeseburgers. But I don;t see capitalization.

    For now, god is one among many.
    And you wonīt, because the Hebrew Alphabet does not even *have* capital letters.

    But Greek does, and it always capitalizes names
    And they donīt waste time writing about cheeseburgers, drunks who f*ck their daughters and "exotic dancers" who cut their customerīs hair.

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    Juan Manuel Fahey

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    Supporting Member eschertron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bob p View Post
    here you go:

    Wander Indiana
    I think Ontario (one of our northern neighbors) still has "yours to explore" as their license plate slogan. I became interested when a car passed me one day with the vanity plate "CINDY" ...and yeah, "yours to explore"

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    Quote Originally Posted by J M Fahey View Post
    And you wonīt, because the Hebrew Alphabet does not even *have* capital letters.
    Heck, the words for God don't even have vowels in Hebrew, but that's a whole other thing.

    But back to the major topic at hand....

    I asked about license plate slogans and that got interesting for a bit. We've pretty much covered TV shows, so I need to inject some other topics.

    1) Toys you lusted after as a kid. I always thought the Johnny 7 One Man Army was cool. Dinky toys were cool, but Corgi toys were better. They frequently had doors and car hoods that opened, steering wheels that turned, etc.


    2) School curriculum that seems bizarre by today's standards. I may have mentioned here or somewhere else that our middle-grade science curriculum included learning all about relevent breeds of farm animals - cows, pigs, sheep, poultry - and what they were optimal for. Middle-school music, of course, had a heavy emphasis on Gilbert & Sullivan.

    3) Foods that you lusted after that they don't make anymore. Could be candy. Could be something else.


    One of my favorite cartoonists is Lynda J. Barry., of Ernie Pook's Comeek fame ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ernie_Pook%27s_Comeek ). She understands the mind of pre-teens and teenage (14-15) girls better than anyone I know. I even used her cartoons as exam questions when I taught adolescent development. (A google image search on "Ernie Pook's commek" will turn up hundreds of strips.)

    Twenty five years ago, she was being interviewed on CBC radio by the late Peter Gzowski. He asked her how she was able to recreate that period of childhood so vividly, and she replied that it begins with making a list of objects. "Like, make a list of your favorite shoes, boots, or running shoes that you ever had. All of those objects are connected to childhood memories." Works like a charm.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Quote Originally Posted by J M Fahey View Post
    And they donīt waste time writing about cheeseburgers, drunks who f*ck their daughters and "exotic dancers" who cut their customerīs hair.
    They leave out all the good stuff you mean? Where's the fun in that?

    When I was a kid I used to collect the plastic racing cars that came in cereal packets. I didn't care about the cereal I only bought it for the cars. When I got a new packet I would rummage through the cereal to find the car. Shock horror! it was loose in there with the product! They'd say a child could easily choke on it these days but I never did. I didn't drown rafting on the river behind our house either and I couldn't swim.

    My sister went to a convent school in Chester. The nuns were like the Mother Superior in the Blues Brothers only ten times worse. They would make the girls eat the rotting vegetables from the canteen even though it made them sick saying starving children in Africa would be grateful for it. Quite often a girl would just disappear one day never to be seen again. This usually coincided with her putting on a little weight.

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    Last edited by Dave H; 04-11-2018 at 01:07 AM.

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    Bent Member Chuck H's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
    Whatever "God" might be, as far as I know, the reference manual is mute on the subject of capitalization. It mentions honoring parents, not killing or stealing, and some others, like not eating cheeseburgers. But I don;t see capitalization.
    Well, Jesus threw over the table in the bazaar that was operating within the church. Something about 'My house is a house of prayer, but you have made it a den of robbers.' So there's THAT. But I'm not religious. I just read The Book a couple of times because it's important culturally. I mean, a third of the world is Christian. Two thirds of the USA where I live. It made sense to me to know something about it beyond what others say.

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    "...less ear-friendly but handy for jazz." Leo_Gnardo

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    "Now get off my lawn with your silicooties and boom-chucka speakers and computers masquerading as amplifiers" Justin Thomas

    "A shot gun delivers a force that exceeds the operational range of most systems, such as pumpkins." Antigua

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    I've never read the bible Chuck. At the wanna be public school (grammar school) I went to it was used as a punishment. When you were in detention they would make you copy out verses of the bible for hours until your hand was dropping off. It's enough to put you off it for life. Still it was preferable to being sent to the headmaster's study for the cane. "Bend over boy! Keep it tight!" Effing pervert!

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    Bent Member Chuck H's Avatar
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    Well I can sure see that. Being basically atheist I have to say that there are parts of the Bible that are a beating to get through. Most of it actually reads like a story though, which isn't so bad. And why shouldn't it read like a story? Scholars have identified writing styles from authors of the time and found amazingly parallel tales in folklore and older dead religions. The tale of God and Jesus would seem to be a mash up of "older religions greatest hits" and put together by popular writers of the time.

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    "...less ear-friendly but handy for jazz." Leo_Gnardo

    "A pedal, any kind, will not make a Guitar player more dangerous than he already is." J M Fahey

    "Now get off my lawn with your silicooties and boom-chucka speakers and computers masquerading as amplifiers" Justin Thomas

    "A shot gun delivers a force that exceeds the operational range of most systems, such as pumpkins." Antigua

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    Supporting Member eschertron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J M Fahey View Post
    And they donīt waste time writing about cheeseburgers, drunks who f*ck their daughters and "exotic dancers" who cut their customerīs hair.
    I appreciate your subtle sarcasm, Juan. However I'm afraid it may pass over the heads of some infidels

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    If it still won't get loud enough, it's probably broken. - Steve Conner
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    Old Timer J M Fahey's Avatar
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    Oh , no sarcasm at all, simply thereīs *two* Bibles; the first one some 50 Books long (+/- a couple ones depending on Geographic area) which is the Hebrew one, and the second, the Greek one, just 4 Books and very focused ones at that (the first 50 ones are all over the place, literally).

    I was talking about the Greek one, in case it wasnīt clear.

    In fact we have a *third* Bible section, which continues where the second one ended, which is the Quran, and this one returned to Arabic like the first one.

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  29. #99
    Supporting Member eschertron's Avatar
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    OK. Consider me enlightened. I've always considered the 'compilation' version to be the capital "B" Bible. But I can see your point about the Gospels being more succinct.

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  30. #100
    Lifetime Member Enzo's Avatar
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    And I wasn't joking about cheeseburgers. Don't stop at Genesis, read through Leviticus and Deuteronomy. It tells you not to mix milk and meat. In other words do not eat the cow who gave you the milk. Part of being Kosher. Mixing meat and milk is the definition of a cheeseburger.

    When I was a kid, there were GI Joes. But the original GI Joe was a real marine tough guy, sort of a step up from rubber "Army Guys". It wasn't until later GI Joe turned into some sort of high tech, super hero-ish team. Closer to Batman. I would love to have an original GI Joe metal lunch box. The cartoonish GI Joe of today... not so much.

    But I did have bags of rubber army guys. The bag was 98 cents, tax was 2 cents, so it was a buck out the door. We went out in the yard and dug holes in the dirt to make bases and forts from which to operate. We played Americans and Nazis or us and Japs. WW2 had just ended 5-10 years earlier, so it was still influencing culture. "I was the Nazis yesterday, YOU have to be Nazis today."

    I liked creative toys. Tinkertoys, Lincoln Logs, and the giant of them all, the Gilbert Erector Set. I got an electronics radio kit at 7, and we know where that led. But the erector set, you used nuts and bolts to screw girders together and make real machines.

    I had a chemistry set too. Good luck getting one of those today.

    I used to like reading Tom Swift Junior books. I aspired to be like Tom. I had some large construction toys, like Tonka Trucks. We played with them in the dirt, but to us they were giant war machines our rubber army guys rode in.

    Food? The store bus sold Twinkies. I still like a Twinkie once a year or so. Of course we had bubble gum, the little comic strip included in each Double Bubble. I liked Necco Wafers - the chalk like discs. Ther were the mixed flavors, and there was the roll of all brown ones - ostensibly chocolate. They still make them. Unfortunately in today's business news, Necco is looking for a buyer or they may fold. New England Confectionery Company. But my real favorite was the Necco Skybar.

    Skybar was laid out like a Hershey bar, but had four sections, each was filled with a different flavor: caramel, vanilla, peanut butter, fudge. You can still buy them at Cracker Barrel. I'd hate to see them go.
    NECCOŪ - Sky Bar

    I miss real root beer. Used to be Hires was real, Frosty was real. Now they are all artificial like Fanta. If I recall it was something about the original root flavoring that could be carcinogenic. Used to get a cold Frosty on the store bus.

    I liked a cereal. It was corn balls like Kix, but they were frosted. They were called Sugar Jets.

    I also liked puffed rice and puffed wheat. Good for munching. But mainly they were sold by Gabby Hayes. Gabby Hayes was the eternal cowboy sidekick. Puffed cereal was "shot from guns" And Gabby did commercials for the puffed cereal. He had a big cannon on the set. He would dump a scoop of wheat or rice into the cannon and BOOM. Puffed wheat came out. I was a big Gabby fan.


    If you might find the bible interesting but don't dig the churchy part. try the "Skeptic's Annotated Bible". It has notes, points out inconsistencies and contradictions.
    Skeptic's Annotated Bible / Quran / Book of Morman>

    And another bible fave: The Brick Testament. The bible as told through Lego blocks
    The Brick Testament

    For a real good parody of CHristians:
    Landover Baptist | Where the Worthwhile Worship. Unsaved Unwelcome

    And of course Betty Bower, America's Best Christian.
    https://www.facebook.com/Mrs-Betty-B...-312383761871/

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  31. #101
    ToneOholic! big_teee's Avatar
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    I have always liked IBC rootbeer.
    I'm allergic to a lot of corn products and syrups.
    IBC uses Cane sugar.
    They sell it at Sams club.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBC_Root_Beer
    **IBC Black Cherry is also heavenly!

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    Terry

  32. #102
    Lifetime Member Enzo's Avatar
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    I love black cherry soda.

    I haven't seen it in decades, but we used to have NeHi, which was a still drink. Basically Kool Aid or Hi-C in a bottle. Came in orange and grape.

    Something else I really like is Birch Beer. I think it is pretty much limited to eastern Pennsylvania, MAryland, Delaware and New Jersey. For general distribution. You can always find it at Cracker Barrel or other retro places. It is a form of root beer. Canada Dry used to make a real good Birch Beer, but they gave up in the 1970s. Now ther are little local brands like Pennsylvania Dutch.

    Sarsaparilla is a close second.

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  33. #103
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    Skybar sounds amazing.

    One of the best parts of Saturday mornings, apart from cartoons, was making a "mountain" out of the blankets and sheets on your bed, full of caves and such, that could provide hideouts for your soldiers.

    Never saw Erector kits, but we had Meccano, which seems to be the same thing. We also had Tinker Toys. There were also these sets of HO-scale army men, made by Airfix, that were more diversified. You could get a wide variety of very specific armies: https://www.ebay.com/b/Airfix-Toy-So...734/bn_1893314

    There is a terrific scene in the movie "The Road to Wellville", about the health obsessions of the physician who started Kellogg's of Battle Creek, where a small group of men are taste-testing various early versions of corn flakes. A lot of spit-takes.

    The meat and dairy thing stems from a phrase, repeated in three places, that one should not "see the kid in its mother's milk". It generalizes to all edible mammals (and not all are permitted to be eaten) and all dairy products and derivatives. Offspring and dairy source do not have to be related. Although, yeah, cheeseburgers are the poster-child for that. But so are all those south Asian dishes that begin with meat being marinated in yogurt. The association between Jews and Chinese food stems partly from the near total absence of dairy from much Chinese cuisine, due to the very high incidence of lactose intolerance amongst Chinese persons (not that what does get served in Chinese restaurants is entirely kosher).

    There was a sort of building-construction toy when I was a kid, called Mini-Brix, that had red bricks, green roofs, and white doors and window sashes. When I got a teaching job at a small university in New Brunswick, the student residences looked to me exactly like Mini-Brix buildings: red brick, green roofs, white trim. I felt like I had been shrunk and placed in aworld made of Mini-Brix.

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  34. #104
    Bent Member Chuck H's Avatar
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    I remember my giant box of Tinker Toys. I think I still had every one of them when a relative bought me another one for a birthday. So I was constructing enormous lattices. I remember doing this thing with the oversize center hole pieces (wheels?) and rubber bands to make fun machines. My mom showed me how to use candle wax on the wood as a lubricant to make things operate smoother. And I had the erector set, the chemistry set. Lincoln Logs, etc. The Legos came later. Like any boy I had big letter books on dinosaurs (and some rubber dinosaurs too!) and also star maps showing constellations and models of the solar system.

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  35. #105
    Lifetime Member Enzo's Avatar
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    In my day Tinker Toys came in a cylindrical box, with a screw cap.

    Little Airfix HO scale guys were for modelers. I have been a model railroader for over 60 years, though more in an armchair sense in recent decades. WHen I build a layout, I need people to stand at the station, to sit in a truck, to fish in a river, etc. Companies like Preisser and Airfix made them in all forms. I think Airfix was more oriented towards military modelers. I could be wrong.

    When we moved into our first house, I was about 4. Not sure if it was before or after my 4th birthday. We had a basement, and dad set up an old door on two sawhorses. Your basic panel door with raised frame parts and sunken panels. He bought me a Lionel 027 train set, and a few Plasticville buildings. We set it up on the door table. The raised parts were "roads" for my buildings. I loved the train set.

    I loved real trains too, stil do. MY mother came from a railroading family up in the Blue Ridge along the Potomac river. Not far from HArpers Ferry, WVA. We traveled by train, and whenever we went to visit grandma, I spent all day down by the tracks. In the town, they had a large engine terminal and a couple sorting yards. The railroad YMCA had a large porch overlooking the roundhouse and turntable. I sat up there for hours on end. Over right by the river - squeezed between the B&O RR and the river - was the C&O canal. The canal dates from the 1820s, and a hundred years later it was still in use. Parts of it are nowdays gentrified and trailed. PArts are restored. Quite a project, it went from Washington DC up to Cumberland.

    Growing up, there was a little CHinese take-out place right down the road. My folks ordered from there now and then. I was a snooty kid, and I always ordered the cheeseburger. Yes, the Chinee joint had cheeseburgers.

    Chuck, you must have been sitting next to me... I loved dinosaur books. We had a large coffeetable book from Life or maybe even NAt Geo, and it was the history of earth more or less. SO it had chapters on the solar system, the geological structure of the earth, dinosaurs and other life, and so on. I loved that book. My dad and I went to an astronomy club for a time, they were grinding their own lenses. We decided that was way too much work. But I knew all the planets and all the (then) moons. I watched all the Werner Von Braun and Disney stuff on TV.

    Sci Fi was important. I loved the cheap saturday Scifi on TV. MY favorite was the cheapest of them all - Captain Video. But also a fan of Tom COrbett Space Cadet, and the Space PAtrol.

    In fact that was my early career goal. I had it all figured out. I was going to be a Good Humor Man in the summer, wearing the white uniform, driving that special white truck, selling ice cream. And in the winter, when Ice cream was not sold, I would be a space ship pilot. It didn't work out for me. MY other goal as a kid was to have a full beard like Ulysses S Grant. That I got covered.

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