Results 1 to 32 of 32

Thread: The making of an eyelet board...

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Edmonton, AB
    Posts
    243
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 223/3
    Given: 112/3
    Rep Power
    5

    The making of an eyelet board...

    So here we go...
    This will eventually become a conversion on a little amp I have, that has a pcb circuit board.

    Here's the fiberboard and eyelets.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	100_2390.jpg 
Views:	105 
Size:	875.2 KB 
ID:	49119

    Holes punched, not drilled.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	punch001.jpg 
Views:	99 
Size:	1,011.2 KB 
ID:	49120

    Business end.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	punch002.jpg 
Views:	99 
Size:	947.2 KB 
ID:	49121

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	punch003.jpg 
Views:	95 
Size:	865.0 KB 
ID:	49122

    Place eyelets in holes...

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	100_2391.jpg 
Views:	107 
Size:	960.1 KB 
ID:	49123

    Tape to hold in place, now off to the eyelet press.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	100_2393.jpg 
Views:	85 
Size:	894.9 KB 
ID:	49124

    Dri...err... I mean, eyelet press.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	100_2395.jpg 
Views:	105 
Size:	940.2 KB 
ID:	49125

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	100_2396.jpg 
Views:	94 
Size:	799.0 KB 
ID:	49126

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	100_2397.jpg 
Views:	97 
Size:	709.1 KB 
ID:	49127

    3 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Edmonton, AB
    Posts
    243
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 223/3
    Given: 112/3
    Rep Power
    5
    oops, it's easy to split the eyelets, less pressure please.


    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	100_2399.jpg 
Views:	93 
Size:	754.3 KB 
ID:	49128

    Done

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	100_2401.jpg 
Views:	74 
Size:	799.4 KB 
ID:	49129

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	100_2402.jpg 
Views:	74 
Size:	798.7 KB 
ID:	49130

    3 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  3. #3
    Supporting Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    1,070
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 63/0
    Given: 43/0
    Rep Power
    14
    Looks good!
    I prefer turrets, and generally use Garolite for the board, so I drill the holes. My friend Pete made some tools for me to stake the turrets. (not pretty, but functional). My "press" is similar to yours!
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DR-9.jpg 
Views:	78 
Size:	1.13 MB 
ID:	49165

    3 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Edmonton, AB
    Posts
    243
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 223/3
    Given: 112/3
    Rep Power
    5
    Thanks Bill!

    Ya, I can see how it might be difficult to use a punch on those boards.

    My plan is to build something "Fenderish" looking, so I went with the eyelets and fiber board.
    I know the circuit can't tell the difference.
    This is my first attempt at this type of build, (I've done home etched pcb's before).
    Also have worked on a few eyelet type amps, Fender, Traynor, etc, and like the ease of modding them.
    Never worked on a turret board type so nothing to compare.

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Edmonton, AB
    Posts
    243
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 223/3
    Given: 112/3
    Rep Power
    5
    So that first board was a test since I have never worked with this stuff before.

    Here's the final version I will be using to convert my Blues Junior to hand wired.
    Started populating the board...

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	100_2410.jpg 
Views:	90 
Size:	942.4 KB 
ID:	49420

    To get to this point the board went thru about 2 dozen iterations.
    I added a tube so it will have tube driven reverb.
    Here it is a little farther along. Still waiting for some parts...

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	100_2416.jpg 
Views:	108 
Size:	974.4 KB 
ID:	49421

    Edit; Hummm, I was going to edit the first post to change the title to include "For Blues Junior Conversion"...
    but I see that it times out for editing.
    Did not know that... as some other forums I am on allow you to edit posts basically forever.
    Oh well, if some kind mod sees this maybe they can change the title for me?

    5 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Edmonton, AB
    Posts
    243
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 223/3
    Given: 112/3
    Rep Power
    5
    A few more pics.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	100_2425.jpg 
Views:	81 
Size:	997.0 KB 
ID:	49431

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	100_2426.jpg 
Views:	71 
Size:	705.5 KB 
ID:	49432

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	100_2429.jpg 
Views:	77 
Size:	871.0 KB 
ID:	49433

    It's getting there...

    3 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Edmonton, AB
    Posts
    243
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 223/3
    Given: 112/3
    Rep Power
    5
    Finally got this wired up.
    Not the neatest wiring job, probably going to howl like a Banshee.

    Smoke test next!

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	100_2432.jpg 
Views:	73 
Size:	776.4 KB 
ID:	49539

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	100_2433.jpg 
Views:	69 
Size:	805.1 KB 
ID:	49540

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	100_2434.jpg 
Views:	80 
Size:	963.6 KB 
ID:	49536

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	100_2435.jpg 
Views:	70 
Size:	926.6 KB 
ID:	49537

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	100_2436.jpg 
Views:	89 
Size:	888.3 KB 
ID:	49538

    3 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    The world is full of people that are right.

  8. #8
    Supporting Member The Dude's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Sioux Falls, SD
    Posts
    6,362
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 1,249/1
    Given: 968/1
    Rep Power
    16
    Looks good to me. Good luck with the smoke test!

    2 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    “Yeah, well, you know, that’s just, like, your opinion, man.”

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Edmonton, AB
    Posts
    243
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 223/3
    Given: 112/3
    Rep Power
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by The Dude View Post
    Looks good to me. Good luck with the smoke test!
    Thanks!

    Smoke test went well.
    Plugged in my lamp limiter, no tubes, checked voltages, all seemed ok. B+ 355
    Installed tubes, again lamp limiter, still no smoke.

    Took it off the limiter... annnnnd.... Ta freakin Da!

    Tweaked the bias (I installed 1 ohm cathode resistors) for about 28ma.

    Worked way better than I expected.
    Very little noise, (back shield panel still not on, amp on bench).
    A little hissy but not bad, certainly no worse than my stock 1978 SFDR.

    I have a hum balance control on the heater string, tweaked for least hum.

    Played it for 1/2 hour, sounds great to me, considering this is my very first build of anything like this...

    I'm Stoked!

    Reverb is incredible, absolutely cavernous, too much even, I think it's the med decay Belton tank, I'll get a short delay tank and see.

    Happy, Happy, Happy,

    6 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    The world is full of people that are right.

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Posts
    153
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 82/0
    Given: 143/2
    Rep Power
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by galaxiex View Post
    Thanks!

    Smoke test went well.
    Plugged in my lamp limiter, no tubes, checked voltages, all seemed ok. B+ 355
    Installed tubes, again lamp limiter, still no smoke.

    Took it off the limiter... annnnnd.... Ta freakin Da!

    Tweaked the bias (I installed 1 ohm cathode resistors) for about 28ma.

    Worked way better than I expected.
    Very little noise, (back shield panel still not on, amp on bench).
    A little hissy but not bad, certainly no worse than my stock 1978 SFDR.

    I have a hum balance control on the heater string, tweaked for least hum.

    Played it for 1/2 hour, sounds great to me, considering this is my very first build of anything like this...

    I'm Stoked!

    Reverb is incredible, absolutely cavernous, too much even, I think it's the med decay Belton tank, I'll get a short delay tank and see.

    Happy, Happy, Happy,
    Awesome! Looks great!

    2 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Edmonton, AB
    Posts
    243
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 223/3
    Given: 112/3
    Rep Power
    5
    Thanks Greg!

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    The world is full of people that are right.

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Edmonton, AB
    Posts
    243
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 223/3
    Given: 112/3
    Rep Power
    5
    Here it is back in the box.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	100_2443.jpg 
Views:	83 
Size:	939.2 KB 
ID:	49547

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	100_2445.jpg 
Views:	59 
Size:	880.4 KB 
ID:	49548

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	100_2446.jpg 
Views:	59 
Size:	846.3 KB 
ID:	49549

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	100_2447.jpg 
Views:	60 
Size:	1.02 MB 
ID:	49550

    I need to make a new back panel for it.

    4 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    The world is full of people that are right.

  13. #13
    Supporting Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Near Nashville
    Posts
    770
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 145/1
    Given: 135/1
    Rep Power
    11
    this is my very first build of anything like this...
    WOW looks really neat and tidy. Nothing I work on ever looks that good.

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  14. #14
    Old Timer J M Fahey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Buenos Aires, Argentina
    Posts
    11,753
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 1,883/23
    Given: 1,463/35
    Rep Power
    27
    Congratulations

    The first "musical instrument amplifier dedicated" tool I bought back in 1969 was a bench eyelet press "to make boards like those on Fender amps" .
    It still works flawlessly 49 years later, have made thousands of boards , even used it for my early SS amps and even today use it regularly for quick projects such as speaker crossovers, simple supplies and such.
    It´s a twist type, similar to this one:

    Still saves my bacon often.

    4 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    Juan Manuel Fahey

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Edmonton, AB
    Posts
    243
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 223/3
    Given: 112/3
    Rep Power
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by dmartn149 View Post
    WOW looks really neat and tidy. Nothing I work on ever looks that good.
    Thanks!.... but full disclosure...

    There is quite a bit of wiring on the back of the eyelet board...

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	100_2409.jpg 
Views:	60 
Size:	943.1 KB 
ID:	49555

    I thought to make the top side wiring less "busy"
    So what you see there is mostly power and grounds and a little bias wiring.

    I'm not sure if you're "supposed to" do this... or not...
    Never seen it done before so IDK.

    I'm sure this will come back to bite me in the a**....

    Indeed it already has...

    I mounted the eyelet board with spacers above the insulating card...
    and with the volume and bass turned up the eyelet card "buzzes" with the low E string.
    Had to shove some foam in there to stop the buzz.

    OR... a short or broken wire under there will cause no end of grief... I'm sure...

    2 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    The world is full of people that are right.

  16. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Edmonton, AB
    Posts
    243
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 223/3
    Given: 112/3
    Rep Power
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by J M Fahey View Post
    Congratulations

    The first "musical instrument amplifier dedicated" tool I bought back in 1969 was a bench eyelet press "to make boards like those on Fender amps" .
    It still works flawlessly 49 years later, have made thousands of boards , even used it for my early SS amps and even today use it regularly for quick projects such as speaker crossovers, simple supplies and such.
    It´s a twist type, similar to this one:

    Still saves my bacon often.
    Thanks JM!

    That's a cool vintage press.

    I've never worked with eyelets before and I'm finding lots of uses for them.

    1 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    The world is full of people that are right.

  17. #17
    Old Timer J M Fahey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Buenos Aires, Argentina
    Posts
    11,753
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 1,883/23
    Given: 1,463/35
    Rep Power
    27
    Of course.
    I only use aluminum for chassis and such, since I buy it by the sheet (in fact in 10 sheet packs, since I know I use it for everything), and cut/punch/bend as needed.
    But... aluminum can´t be soldered (in practical terms) so preferred assembly way is by riveting parts together.

    I use nickel plated 3.5mm (~1/8") by 7 to 9 mm (almost 3/8") hollow rivets/eyelets to assemble heat sinks, chassis reinforcements, double thickness areas for better heatsinking, the works.

    Plus repairing belts, etc.

    2 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    Juan Manuel Fahey

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Edmonton, AB
    Posts
    243
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 223/3
    Given: 112/3
    Rep Power
    5
    Here's the schematic I made for this conversion.

    It's basically a mish-mash of the AB763 Deluxe Reverb effects channel minus the tremolo,
    and the Blues Junior from the Master Volume to the power tubes.
    Plus a few tweaks like the added Mid pot, etc.

    The stock BJ uses a 50k MV, I didn't have one, so used a 100k instead.

    Stock BJ transformers plus the replacement TX for the reverb.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	BLUES JUNIOR Conversion.jpg 
Views:	58 
Size:	279.8 KB 
ID:	49564

    1 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    The world is full of people that are right.

  19. #19
    Bent Member Chuck H's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    pacific north west
    Posts
    15,410
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 2,400/4
    Given: 2,775/0
    Rep Power
    30
    Quote Originally Posted by galaxiex View Post
    Thanks!.... but full disclosure...

    There is quite a bit of wiring on the back of the eyelet board...

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	100_2409.jpg 
Views:	60 
Size:	943.1 KB 
ID:	49555

    I thought to make the top side wiring less "busy"
    So what you see there is mostly power and grounds and a little bias wiring.

    I'm not sure if you're "supposed to" do this... or not...
    Never seen it done before so IDK.

    I'm sure this will come back to bite me in the a**....

    Indeed it already has...

    I mounted the eyelet board with spacers above the insulating card...
    and with the volume and bass turned up the eyelet card "buzzes" with the low E string.
    Had to shove some foam in there to stop the buzz.

    OR... a short or broken wire under there will cause no end of grief... I'm sure...
    In all my designs I never do under board wiring and I try to keep repair/remodel access in mind. Because Murphy says that if a problem does come up you're going to have to unsolder a bunch of crap and lift the board to fix it. And Murphy also says that in that long process you'll end up with a secondary problem that will mean doing it again. Nope. I'd rather have form follow function. To hell with pretty.

    2 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    "In fact when I run into problems working on electronic circuirts, there are so many times that when I finally track it down, the source of the problem is located between my soldering iron and my seat." SoulFetish

    "Now get off my lawn with your silicooties and boom-chucka speakers and computers masquerading as amplifiers" Justin Thomas

    "Being born on third base and thinking that you must have hit a triple is pure delusion!" Steve A

  20. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Edmonton, AB
    Posts
    243
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 223/3
    Given: 112/3
    Rep Power
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck H View Post
    In all my designs I never do under board wiring and I try to keep repair/remodel access in mind. Because Murphy says that if a problem does come up you're going to have to unsolder a bunch of crap and lift the board to fix it. And Murphy also says that in that long process you'll end up with a secondary problem that will mean doing it again. Nope. I'd rather have form follow function. To hell with pretty.
    I hear ya Chuck.

    I thought about all that when I made the decision to do this.
    In the end my desire for a "pretty" board won out.
    ...and it's not all that much "more pretty" anyway....

    First time it gives me trouble
    I'll probably snip off all the under board wires and put them on top.

    2 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    The world is full of people that are right.

  21. #21
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Edmonton, AB
    Posts
    243
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 223/3
    Given: 112/3
    Rep Power
    5
    Got started on a new back panel for this that allows access to the fuse, speaker jack and hum balance.
    Now waiting for some tolex to arrive.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	100_2452.jpg 
Views:	68 
Size:	823.9 KB 
ID:	49576

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	100_2453.jpg 
Views:	59 
Size:	846.6 KB 
ID:	49577

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	100_2454.jpg 
Views:	59 
Size:	814.9 KB 
ID:	49578

    3 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    The world is full of people that are right.

  22. #22
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Edmonton, AB
    Posts
    243
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 223/3
    Given: 112/3
    Rep Power
    5
    ...and a little update on the schematic.

    I forgot to add the 2000pf cap on the grid of the reverb recovery tube.

    Moved some other stuff around to make it a little easier to read.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	BLUES JUNIOR Conversion.jpg 
Views:	66 
Size:	282.9 KB 
ID:	49582

    1 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    The world is full of people that are right.

  23. #23
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Edmonton, AB
    Posts
    243
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 223/3
    Given: 112/3
    Rep Power
    5
    So I've been playing this for a while now and like it very much.

    Nice cleans and great crunch when cranked.
    Tone controls very effective, can dial in whatever I want.
    Honky mids to thick thunderous bass, great scooped sound, glassy treble, etc.

    Sure couldn't do all that with the stock BJ.

    The only minor issue is the reverb.
    When cranked to "12" the reverb is on the edge of feedback, and waaaaay too much reverb.
    I know I can just dial it down/not turn it up so much, but how would you go about taming this?
    What component value changes would you look at making?

    Thanks!

    Edit; This seems to be a problem on almost anything I "build". Way over the top reverb, on amps that have it. SS or tube.
    I don't actually design anything... I just kinda "paint by numbers" and copy existing schematics.
    Sometimes, like this one, I mish-mash different circuits just to see....

    1 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    The world is full of people that are right.

  24. #24
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Edmonton, AB
    Posts
    243
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 223/3
    Given: 112/3
    Rep Power
    5
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	BLUES JUNIOR Conversion.jpg 
Views:	59 
Size:	304.2 KB 
ID:	49612

    Updated the schem with voltages...

    I seem to always forget to do this, (add voltages to schem) for some weird reason, even tho I know it's kinda important. (insert embarrassed smiley here)

    3 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    Last edited by galaxiex; 07-05-2018 at 05:49 AM.
    The world is full of people that are right.

  25. #25
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Edmonton, AB
    Posts
    243
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 223/3
    Given: 112/3
    Rep Power
    5
    A small update on this,

    I removed C18, the 22uf bypass cap on the reverb recovery.

    The reverb was waaaaaay over the top on this amp, bordering on feedback.

    Pulling the cap tamed it to a reasonable level.
    Before, reverb on 3 and it was lots, but nudge the knob and it became too much.
    Now reverb on 4 and it's good, and much smoother increase with knob rotation.

    2 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    The world is full of people that are right.

  26. #26
    Bent Member Chuck H's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    pacific north west
    Posts
    15,410
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 2,400/4
    Given: 2,775/0
    Rep Power
    30
    Quote Originally Posted by galaxiex View Post
    A small update on this,

    I removed C18, the 22uf bypass cap on the reverb recovery.

    The reverb was waaaaaay over the top on this amp, bordering on feedback.

    Pulling the cap tamed it to a reasonable level.
    Before, reverb on 3 and it was lots, but nudge the knob and it became too much.
    Now reverb on 4 and it's good, and much smoother increase with knob rotation.
    I had a similar situation with the last reverb amp I did. Too much reverb. But really just too much in the LF. I could have trimmed the cap feeding the driver, but I liked the idea of bigger reverb tone so instead I changed the recovery triode cathode bypass cap from 22uf to .1uf. That did the trick. So if you think you might like a brighter reverb now that you've trimmed the level you can always partially bypass rather than leave your cathode unbypassed.

    3 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    "In fact when I run into problems working on electronic circuirts, there are so many times that when I finally track it down, the source of the problem is located between my soldering iron and my seat." SoulFetish

    "Now get off my lawn with your silicooties and boom-chucka speakers and computers masquerading as amplifiers" Justin Thomas

    "Being born on third base and thinking that you must have hit a triple is pure delusion!" Steve A

  27. #27
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Edmonton, AB
    Posts
    243
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 223/3
    Given: 112/3
    Rep Power
    5
    Thanks Chuck,

    I never even thought to try a smaller cap there.

    As is the reverb now sounds pretty good, but it won't hurt to experiment.

    1 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    The world is full of people that are right.

  28. #28
    Old Timer J M Fahey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Buenos Aires, Argentina
    Posts
    11,753
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 1,883/23
    Given: 1,463/35
    Rep Power
    27
    Quote Originally Posted by galaxiex View Post
    Got started on a new back panel for this that allows access to the fuse, speaker jack and hum balance.
    Now waiting for some tolex to arrive.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	100_2452.jpg 
Views:	68 
Size:	823.9 KB 
ID:	49576
    Now you have a long relatively narrow strip of ¿MDF? as the bottom of your back speaker panel.

    I would cut a long narrow strip of said material (maybe from the routed out oblong strip material), say 1 cm narrower on top and bottom so it´s invisible, 2 or 3 cm shorter at each end so it clears the mounting cleats, and glue it along the bottom strip for added strength, on the inside of course.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Galaxiex.jpg 
Views:	57 
Size:	201.8 KB 
ID:	49992


    Leo would have cut two smaller oblong holes instead, leaving center untouched for strength but you already cut, so ....


    3 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    Juan Manuel Fahey

  29. #29
    Bent Member Chuck H's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    pacific north west
    Posts
    15,410
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 2,400/4
    Given: 2,775/0
    Rep Power
    30
    Quote Originally Posted by J M Fahey View Post
    Now you have a long relatively narrow strip of ¿MDF? as the bottom of your back speaker panel.

    I would cut a long narrow strip of said material (maybe from the routed out oblong strip material), say 1 cm narrower on top and bottom so it´s invisible, 2 or 3 cm shorter at each end so it clears the mounting cleats, and glue it along the bottom strip for added strength, on the inside of course.

    Leo would have cut two smaller oblong holes instead, leaving center untouched for strength but you already cut, so ....
    Good catch. Don't need that long, thin panel flapping around. Another option might be to square the back panel at the top line of the peek a boo and then install a piece of channel aluminum as the tube protection. Since the tubes are all rowed close to the back it seconds as a heat sink. I think Mesa did this with one of their models and I always thought it was a good idea. Doesn't look very retro though.

    EDIT: Here's an image.

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	aluminumtubeguard.jpg 
Views:	188 
Size:	39.9 KB 
ID:	49994  

    2 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    "In fact when I run into problems working on electronic circuirts, there are so many times that when I finally track it down, the source of the problem is located between my soldering iron and my seat." SoulFetish

    "Now get off my lawn with your silicooties and boom-chucka speakers and computers masquerading as amplifiers" Justin Thomas

    "Being born on third base and thinking that you must have hit a triple is pure delusion!" Steve A

  30. #30
    Senior Member SoulFetish's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    1,226
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 432/1
    Given: 361/0
    Rep Power
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by J M Fahey View Post
    Congratulations

    The first "musical instrument amplifier dedicated" tool I bought back in 1969 was a bench eyelet press "to make boards like those on Fender amps" .
    It still works flawlessly 49 years later, have made thousands of boards , even used it for my early SS amps and even today use it regularly for quick projects such as speaker crossovers, simple supplies and such.
    It´s a twist type, similar to this one:

    Still saves my bacon often.
    “Thumbs up”

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    If I have a 50% chance of guessing the right answer, I guess wrong 80% of the time.

  31. #31
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Edmonton, AB
    Posts
    243
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 223/3
    Given: 112/3
    Rep Power
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by J M Fahey View Post
    Now you have a long relatively narrow strip of ¿MDF? as the bottom of your back speaker panel.

    I would cut a long narrow strip of said material (maybe from the routed out oblong strip material), say 1 cm narrower on top and bottom so it´s invisible, 2 or 3 cm shorter at each end so it clears the mounting cleats, and glue it along the bottom strip for added strength, on the inside of course.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Galaxiex.jpg 
Views:	57 
Size:	201.8 KB 
ID:	49992


    Leo would have cut two smaller oblong holes instead, leaving center untouched for strength but you already cut, so ....

    Thanks JM,

    I made the back panel out of what we call "Masonite" or "Hardboard".
    Very similar to what was used for the original.

    It's 1/4" thick and fairly stiff with the Tolex on it.

    Breakage was/is a slight concern... I thought about reinforcing it with something, but it seems fine.
    It does vibrate somewhat when playing loud but doesn't add any noise that I can hear.
    It was so easy to make I could do another with the double cutouts if it gets damaged.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	100_2493.jpg 
Views:	50 
Size:	596.6 KB 
ID:	49998

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	100_2494.jpg 
Views:	45 
Size:	843.3 KB 
ID:	49999

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	100_2495.jpg 
Views:	44 
Size:	678.7 KB 
ID:	50000

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	100_2497.jpg 
Views:	46 
Size:	722.1 KB 
ID:	50001

    As you can see I have not yet applied any shielding foil.
    I plan to, but the amp is quiet even without it.

    1 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    The world is full of people that are right.

  32. #32
    Supporting Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    2,316
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 1,771/1
    Given: 1,014/2
    Rep Power
    5
    As you can see I have not yet applied any shielding foil.
    Just make sure the foil is grounded via chassis contact, if you do (shouldn't be a problem). Otherwise the foil could make things worse.

    3 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    - Own Opinions Only -

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Best eyelet board material
    By Jarvini in forum Guitar Amps
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 09-06-2017, 11:15 PM
  2. Eyelet Board
    By Bloomfield in forum Build Your Amp
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 11-30-2016, 04:26 AM
  3. Conductive Eyelet Board
    By lowell in forum Maintenance, Troubleshooting & Repair
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 04-18-2015, 10:37 PM
  4. eyelet board wiring
    By camnicklaus in forum Build Your Amp
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 12-30-2008, 01:57 AM
  5. turret board vs eyelet board
    By clintonb in forum Build Your Amp
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 09-22-2007, 08:44 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •