Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: Stabilize particle board?

  1. #1
    Supporting Member Axtman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Seattle WA
    Posts
    437
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 42/0
    Given: 2/0
    Rep Power
    14

    Stabilize particle board?

    I recently picked up a broken 1980's Peavey Mark III bass amp head at a swap meet for $15!

    I repaired the electronics and now need to repair the cabinet. It looks like the cabinet sat in a wet basement. I could not reglue the tolex because the particle board kept flaking off. I stripped off the tolex and have sanded down the cabinet. I would like to "stabilize" the particle board to reduce further crumbling. My thought is to paint the whole cabinet with a watered down carpenters glue. After the glue solution has dried I will sand and roll on truck bed liner or recover with new tolex.

    Will watered down glue work?

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  2. #2
    Supporting Member Jazz P Bass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Wernersville, PA
    Posts
    13,024
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 587/3
    Given: 306/0
    Rep Power
    28
    The water base may make things worse.

    I would try sealing it with polyurethane.

    1 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  3. #3
    Supporting Member Axtman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Seattle WA
    Posts
    437
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 42/0
    Given: 2/0
    Rep Power
    14
    Yeah you are right. Water will make the wood swell.

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  4. #4
    Supporting Member John_H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Las Vegas Nevada
    Posts
    1,131
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 264/1
    Given: 255/0
    Rep Power
    15
    I would seal it with shellac. Unlike some poly's, anything will bond to it. Buy a quart, and brush it on. I use the Kilz solvent base for pigmented, and Zinsser for clear.

    3 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  5. #5
    Bent Member Chuck H's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    pacific north west
    Posts
    15,897
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 2,744/4
    Given: 3,208/0
    Rep Power
    30
    Something to keep in mind is that particle board is already full of glues and plastics, etc. Obviously water can penetrate it but you do want to put something on there that will soak in and actually harden the now fragile matrix. I haven't tried the Minwax Wood Hardener but I look at it all the time when I shop for painting supplies. I like Minwax products. I'm keeping this one in mind for when such a circumstance arises. This may be one. It's designed to soak into rotten wood and harden it so that it can be worked without crumbling. Seems like just the right stuff. Available at most hardware stores.

    1 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    "In fact when I run into problems working on electronic circuirts, there are so many times that when I finally track it down, the source of the problem is located between my soldering iron and my seat." SoulFetish

    "Now get off my lawn with your silicooties and boom-chucka speakers and computers masquerading as amplifiers" Justin Thomas

    "Being born on third base and thinking that you must have hit a triple is pure delusion!" Steve A

  6. #6
    Supporting Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Nova Scotia
    Posts
    213
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 109/1
    Given: 249/1
    Rep Power
    4
    Good call on the shellac, it is an excellent barrier coat between finishes. If the crumbling is really bad you could try squegeeing some thinned down epoxy or even polyester resin into it and then sanding again.

    Andy

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  7. #7
    Supporting Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    1,071
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 65/0
    Given: 45/0
    Rep Power
    14
    I've never tried to stabilize particle board, but for all the trouble, I think I would just build another cab from ply. If you have to retolex anyway, you can start with a smooth surface. (Also, a little lighter!)
    Here's a little Peavey practice amp that had a broken cab, (I used biscuits to put it together).
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	RSBandit1.jpg 
Views:	66 
Size:	153.7 KB 
ID:	50269

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  8. #8
    Supporting Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Nova Scotia
    Posts
    213
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 109/1
    Given: 249/1
    Rep Power
    4
    I'll admit 'build a new cabinet' was my first thought too, but not everyone has woodworking tools or skills. Considering the amp only cost $15, any amount of plywood etc. would soon add up to more than that. Trying to fix up the old particle board doesn't seem such a bad idea in that light. Bondo works well for any filling holes and dents that might be in it.

    Andy

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  9. #9
    Lifetime Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    4,448
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 443/1
    Given: 3/0
    Rep Power
    21
    There are products for the marine/boating industry, the name brand "Getz-Rot" being one of them. They are water-thin catalyzed epoxies which are designed to soak into wood damaged by rot and stabilize it - very much like what you describe. You might try one of these.

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    Amazing!! Who would ever have guessed that someone who villified the evil rich people would begin happily accepting their millions in speaking fees!

    Oh, wait! That sounds familiar, somehow.

  10. #10
    Supporting Member Axtman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Seattle WA
    Posts
    437
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 42/0
    Given: 2/0
    Rep Power
    14
    This is what I used to stablize the particle board. BTW the "particle board" is really more like OSB. The sawdust particles are larger than dust. The product is expensive and worked okay.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_7164.JPG 
Views:	42 
Size:	558.2 KB 
ID:	50516  

    1 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  11. #11
    Old Timer olddawg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    La Jolla CA, Hanalei, Kauai
    Posts
    3,054
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 342/0
    Given: 36/1
    Rep Power
    16
    Know anyone who makes or repairs surfboards? I would imagine the catalytic resin they use would be fine and inexpensive. Same stuff they use to patch and repair fiberglass boats.

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    184
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 8/3
    Given: 172/14
    Rep Power
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by R.G. View Post
    There are products for the marine/boating industry, the name brand "Getz-Rot" being one of them. They are water-thin catalyzed epoxies which are designed to soak into wood damaged by rot and stabilize it - very much like what you describe. You might try one of these.
    Is that what they called it when Stan Getz began to lose popularity!

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 79
    Last Post: 05-28-2016, 02:46 PM
  2. How to attach board?
    By pbiagi in forum 5 E 3
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 02-26-2011, 06:10 PM
  3. G-10 board
    By Paul P in forum Build Your Amp
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 05-02-2010, 07:51 AM
  4. turret board vs eyelet board
    By clintonb in forum Build Your Amp
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 09-22-2007, 08:44 PM
  5. Is the old board gone?
    By pupoholic in forum Pickup Makers
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 08-01-2006, 11:06 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •