Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 35 of 40

Thread: Who Screws the Screws?

  1. #1
    Twobie
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Posts
    4
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 0/0
    Given: 0/0
    Rep Power
    0

    Who Screws the Screws?

    Has anyone come across a pedal with screws so tight it seems like they were glued in place?

    I recently got a great audio interface made by Orange but it suddenly went bad. When I tried to open it up the screws absolutely would not budge. Any advice?

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  2. #2
    Bent Member Chuck H's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    pacific north west
    Posts
    15,934
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 2,772/4
    Given: 3,249/0
    Rep Power
    30
    Quote Originally Posted by Looselectronics View Post
    Has anyone come across a pedal with screws so tight it seems like they were glued in place?

    I recently got a great audio interface made by Orange but it suddenly went bad. When I tried to open it up the screws absolutely would not budge. Any advice?
    Heat them by sticking the tip of your soldering iron on the head. If they were CA'd in place that'll help crack them loose. Otherwise it will expand the metal and temporarily tighten them. But then they'll often break easier once they cool. And I'm bad about this because I don't replace my tools often enough, but a new phillips head screw driver will grab a lot more secure in the head than a rounded old one giving you more ability to force the matter without damage to the screw.

    1 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    Last edited by Chuck H; 01-14-2020 at 01:54 AM.
    "In fact when I run into problems working on electronic circuirts, there are so many times that when I finally track it down, the source of the problem is located between my soldering iron and my seat." SoulFetish

    "Now get off my lawn with your silicooties and boom-chucka speakers and computers masquerading as amplifiers" Justin Thomas

    "Being born on third base and thinking that you must have hit a triple is pure delusion!" Steve A

  3. #3
    Lifetime Member Enzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Lansing, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    32,751
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 2,162/7
    Given: 0/0
    Rep Power
    55
    So many tricks of the trade...

    Sometimes tightening a screw ever so slightly will crack it free, then you can back it out.

    SOmetimes Tapping the handle end of your driver as you apply some turn will start it loose.

    Put your driver in the head, and hold a solder iron against it near the top to apply heat to the screw.

    1 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

  4. #4
    Supporting Member The Dude's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Sioux Falls, SD
    Posts
    6,593
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 1,406/1
    Given: 1,059/1
    Rep Power
    16
    I've run into this before- even worse when someone has stripped the heads out leaving you nothing to grab onto. I'll take a dremel tool and grind a slot in the screw head(s) and use a straight slot screwdriver to get them out. Then, just toss them and install new ones when you reassemble it.

    2 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    “Yeah, well, you know, that’s just, like, your opinion, man.”

  5. #5
    Supporting Member eschertron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Great Black Swamp
    Posts
    2,293
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 475/0
    Given: 1,259/1
    Rep Power
    11
    Chuck beat me to the 'size matters' point, but it bears repeating. It only took me 30 years to realize that a properly-sized screwdriver in a well-made (not junk) screw will fit with absolutely no gap; the firm contact allows much more torque to be applied without fear of stripping. Otherwise the screw gets turned into a tiny metal martini glass.

    Once you've sized the screwdriver to the application and still no joy, the heat* treatment can work a treat!

    edit: *or other

    2 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    If it still won't get loud enough, it's probably broken. - Steve Conner
    If the thing works, stop fixing it. - Enzo
    We need more chaos in music, in art... I'm here to make it. - Justin Thomas
    MANY things in human experience can be easily differentiated, yet *impossible* to express as a measurement. - Juan Fahey


  6. #6
    Lifetime Member Enzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Lansing, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    32,751
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 2,162/7
    Given: 0/0
    Rep Power
    55
    Done that many times^^^

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

  7. #7
    Lifetime Member Enzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Lansing, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    32,751
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 2,162/7
    Given: 0/0
    Rep Power
    55
    esch makes a good point too.

    Not all crosspoint drivers are phillips. Phillips do come in sizes, and folks way often use too small a size. But there are also posidrive, and Reed-Prince (Frearson). There is also a Japanese standard I forget the name of. It LOOKS like a phillips, but is not. It has a little dot next to the hole. We see it often in the machine screws in Japanese products.

    3 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

  8. #8
    Don't forget the joker g1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Canada, somewhere north of Fargo
    Posts
    12,207
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 1,947/24
    Given: 4,918/11
    Rep Power
    24
    I have one of those impact drivers that you tap on with a hammer, but it's not great for smaller stuff.
    I sometimes use a bit, held by mini-visegrip, and tap with a small hobby hammer as I apply turning pressure.

    One thing I did come across, which I don't suspect for your Orange product, was fake screws molded into a plastic casing.

    2 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    "Everything is better with a tube. I have a customer with an all-tube pacemaker. His heartbeat is steady, reassuring and dependable, not like a modern heartbeat. And if it goes wrong he can fix it himself. You can't do that with SMD." - Mick Bailey

  9. #9
    Supporting Member eschertron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Great Black Swamp
    Posts
    2,293
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 475/0
    Given: 1,259/1
    Rep Power
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
    esch makes a good point too.

    Not all crosspoint drivers are phillips. Phillips do come in sizes, and folks way often use too small a size. But there are also posidrive, and Reed-Prince (Frearson). There is also a Japanese standard I forget the name of. It LOOKS like a phillips, but is not. It has a little dot next to the hole. We see it often in the machine screws in Japanese products.
    I have a few phillips-head drivers that I ground the tip off of so that they would fit 'better' in a Reed-Prince screw. Saved my butt many times.

    I have a hunch that many of the screws in the offshore equipment I ran into (mostly in the 80s, 90s) were fabricated by the same folks who made the imported sockets, etc., found in K-Mart and others. Close to being in tolerance, but not close enough to actually work as designed.

    2 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    If it still won't get loud enough, it's probably broken. - Steve Conner
    If the thing works, stop fixing it. - Enzo
    We need more chaos in music, in art... I'm here to make it. - Justin Thomas
    MANY things in human experience can be easily differentiated, yet *impossible* to express as a measurement. - Juan Fahey


  10. #10
    Bent Member Chuck H's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    pacific north west
    Posts
    15,934
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 2,772/4
    Given: 3,249/0
    Rep Power
    30
    Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
    There is also a Japanese standard I forget the name of. It LOOKS like a phillips, but is not. It has a little dot next to the hole. We see it often in the machine screws in Japanese products.
    I always wondered what the heck that was about. Fortunately the Japanese seem to use good quality metal for the screws so I haven't had a problem with yet

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    "In fact when I run into problems working on electronic circuirts, there are so many times that when I finally track it down, the source of the problem is located between my soldering iron and my seat." SoulFetish

    "Now get off my lawn with your silicooties and boom-chucka speakers and computers masquerading as amplifiers" Justin Thomas

    "Being born on third base and thinking that you must have hit a triple is pure delusion!" Steve A

  11. #11
    Bent Member Chuck H's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    pacific north west
    Posts
    15,934
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 2,772/4
    Given: 3,249/0
    Rep Power
    30
    Quote Originally Posted by eschertron View Post
    I have a few phillips-head drivers that I ground the tip off of so that they would fit 'better' in a Reed-Prince screw. Saved my butt many times.

    I have a hunch that many of the screws in the offshore equipment I ran into (mostly in the 80s, 90s) were fabricated by the same folks who made the imported sockets, etc., found in K-Mart and others. Close to being in tolerance, but not close enough to actually work as designed.
    Wow! This goes deep. I thought the stuff that didn't fit was just crappy stuff. Ya' know, because that happens. I didn't know there wasn't a standard for cross point screws because I've NEVER seen a reference to one other than the standard Phillips.?.

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    "In fact when I run into problems working on electronic circuirts, there are so many times that when I finally track it down, the source of the problem is located between my soldering iron and my seat." SoulFetish

    "Now get off my lawn with your silicooties and boom-chucka speakers and computers masquerading as amplifiers" Justin Thomas

    "Being born on third base and thinking that you must have hit a triple is pure delusion!" Steve A

  12. #12
    Supporting Member Jazz P Bass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Wernersville, PA
    Posts
    13,038
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 592/3
    Given: 307/0
    Rep Power
    28

    2 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Cheshire, UK
    Posts
    2,295
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 596/4
    Given: 308/0
    Rep Power
    16
    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck H View Post
    I thought the stuff that didn't fit was just crappy stuff. Ya' know, because that happens. I didn't know there wasn't a standard for cross point screws because I've NEVER seen a reference to one other than the standard Phillips.?.
    Orange cross head screws are probably Pozidriv therefore a Pozidriv bit should be used not a Phillips. A Phillips bit will fit in a Pozidriv screw but slips out before it's fully tight.

    Phillips on the left, Posidriv on the right
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	021254038-phillips_xlg-700x603.jpg 
Views:	25 
Size:	67.9 KB 
ID:	56630

    2 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    Last edited by Dave H; 01-14-2020 at 03:30 AM.

  14. #14
    Lifetime Member Enzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Lansing, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    32,751
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 2,162/7
    Given: 0/0
    Rep Power
    55
    When I first noticed the dot on Japanese screws I thought it just meant metric, but I later learned their driver is shaped different.

    Oh Chuck, there is a world of screw slots out there. Decades ago I learned the difference between Bristol and Spline, and took an interest in the subject. When I was in the coin-operated amusements world, I added security screws to my "hobby". We all should know clutch heads from old Ampeg.

    Here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_screw_drives

    1 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

  15. #15
    Bent Member Chuck H's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    pacific north west
    Posts
    15,934
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 2,772/4
    Given: 3,249/0
    Rep Power
    30
    Well, yes. But I always thought the obviously odd shaped cross screws were just rare and odd. "You gotta buy a special tool for that". I don't do repairs so it never came up often enough to matter, much. Though there have been times when it did and I was at a loss I managed somehow. But to learn that probably 30% of the problematic "Phillips" screws I've encountered weren't even Phillips and that there was a proper fitting tool is absolutely news to me. I never thought the ratio could be that high.

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    "In fact when I run into problems working on electronic circuirts, there are so many times that when I finally track it down, the source of the problem is located between my soldering iron and my seat." SoulFetish

    "Now get off my lawn with your silicooties and boom-chucka speakers and computers masquerading as amplifiers" Justin Thomas

    "Being born on third base and thinking that you must have hit a triple is pure delusion!" Steve A

  16. #16
    Don't forget the joker g1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Canada, somewhere north of Fargo
    Posts
    12,207
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 1,947/24
    Given: 4,918/11
    Rep Power
    24
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave H View Post
    A Phillips bit will fit in a Pozidriv screw but slips out before it's fully tight.

    Phillips on the left, Posidriv on the right
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	021254038-phillips_xlg-700x603.jpg 
Views:	25 
Size:	67.9 KB 
ID:	56630
    Interesting. I'd always assumed that they were the same except for the extra smaller ribs. If that were the case, the phillips still shouldn't slip out of the pozidriv.
    But your close up photo shows that the main ribs of the phillips are tapered (toward the tip), where the pozidriv are not.

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    "Everything is better with a tube. I have a customer with an all-tube pacemaker. His heartbeat is steady, reassuring and dependable, not like a modern heartbeat. And if it goes wrong he can fix it himself. You can't do that with SMD." - Mick Bailey

  17. #17
    Lifetime Member Enzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Lansing, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    32,751
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 2,162/7
    Given: 0/0
    Rep Power
    55
    They are all so similar, most of the time, at least for light work, the "wrong" driver will work. And threads are threads, so a 3mm one type will replace a 3mm of another. SOmetimes I find a rounded out head on a screw, and one of my "wrong" drivers will grip it better.

    1 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

  18. #18
    Don't forget the joker g1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Canada, somewhere north of Fargo
    Posts
    12,207
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 1,947/24
    Given: 4,918/11
    Rep Power
    24
    Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
    SOmetimes I find a rounded out head on a screw, and one of my "wrong" drivers will grip it better.
    My 'go to' for that is usually a Robertson (red, green, or yellow) and a hammer.

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    "Everything is better with a tube. I have a customer with an all-tube pacemaker. His heartbeat is steady, reassuring and dependable, not like a modern heartbeat. And if it goes wrong he can fix it himself. You can't do that with SMD." - Mick Bailey

  19. #19
    Supporting Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    3,702
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 412/0
    Given: 67/0
    Rep Power
    14
    US thread sizes are relatively uncommon over here in the UK and a regular thing is to force a metric screw into a threaded hole and it gets jammed. If the screw is poor quality it can either break or the slot deform. Another gripe is screws that strip on their way out. Chinese Vox amps sometimes do this, even when taking utmost care. Another gripe is where someone has put together a guitar and not drilled pilot holes for the screws and chewed up the heads so they won't come out. Or worse, broken off and they bring the guitar to me to sort out.

    I just did a pickup repair where the coil is partly exposed (Nocaster). The owner had caught the winding when fitting it. I fixed it, re-potted it and supplied new screws. He'd originally fitted it with the screws angled outward and I advised him to plug and re-drill the holes correctly. He didn't do this and managed to destroy one of the screw heads so it would neither screw in or out. So, he taped up the pickup and used a Dremel to cut through the tape and winding in an attempt to remove the screw. Then pulled off the tape along with more wire. Along with that, the flatwork got bent away from the pole pieces. Steel screws, Dremels and pickups are an unhealthy combination anyhow.

    2 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  20. #20
    Supporting Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    2,750
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 2,082/1
    Given: 1,186/2
    Rep Power
    5
    With somewhat worn screwheads a (well fitting) screwdriver with a diamond coated tip can help to avoid slippage and further damage.
    That's what I prefer to use on vintage instruments.

    When lots of torque are required angled screwdrivers can be helpful.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0297.JPG 
Views:	13 
Size:	616.8 KB 
ID:	56640

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    Last edited by Helmholtz; 01-14-2020 at 05:55 PM.
    - Own Opinions Only -

  21. #21
    Supporting Member eschertron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Great Black Swamp
    Posts
    2,293
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 475/0
    Given: 1,259/1
    Rep Power
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave H View Post
    Orange cross head screws are probably Pozidriv therefore a Pozidriv bit should be used not a Phillips. A Phillips bit will fit in a Pozidriv screw but slips out before it's fully tight.

    Phillips on the left, Posidriv on the right
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	021254038-phillips_xlg-700x603.jpg 
Views:	25 
Size:	67.9 KB 
ID:	56630
    Someone once regaled me with the story on posidriv screws, something about manufacturers and suppliers angling for exclusivity with the automakers, I think. That's why there are so many types of screw head designs.

    But I turned 60 over the weekend, and now can't remember anything anybody has ever told me. sigh.

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    If it still won't get loud enough, it's probably broken. - Steve Conner
    If the thing works, stop fixing it. - Enzo
    We need more chaos in music, in art... I'm here to make it. - Justin Thomas
    MANY things in human experience can be easily differentiated, yet *impossible* to express as a measurement. - Juan Fahey


  22. #22
    Don't forget the joker g1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Canada, somewhere north of Fargo
    Posts
    12,207
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 1,947/24
    Given: 4,918/11
    Rep Power
    24
    Quote Originally Posted by Helmholtz View Post

    When lots of torque are required angled screwdrivers can be helpful.
    Or a ratchet with a bit holder socket. Then you can push down on the head with one hand while applying turning pressure with the other.

    1 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    "Everything is better with a tube. I have a customer with an all-tube pacemaker. His heartbeat is steady, reassuring and dependable, not like a modern heartbeat. And if it goes wrong he can fix it himself. You can't do that with SMD." - Mick Bailey

  23. #23
    Twobie
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Posts
    4
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 0/0
    Given: 0/0
    Rep Power
    0
    Schooled! You guys are awesome. I had no idea screwing was such a varied and interest topic filled with tools of so many shapes and sizes.

    I tried again with a shorter L-shaped two-way driver with a different bit made of a better material that fit more snuggly. That gave me the additional torque I needed to loosen the stubborn screws, though I damaged the heads and my wrist in the process. All that just to find the guts of the pedal are SMD wrapped in a PITA. I guess I'll just buy a new one after all...

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  24. #24
    Bent Member Chuck H's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    pacific north west
    Posts
    15,934
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 2,772/4
    Given: 3,249/0
    Rep Power
    30
    Quote Originally Posted by Looselectronics View Post
    Schooled! You guys are awesome. I had no idea screwing was such a varied and interest topic filled with tools of so many shapes and sizes.

    I tried again with a shorter L-shaped two-way driver with a different bit made of a better material that fit more snuggly. That gave me the additional torque I needed to loosen the stubborn screws, though I damaged the heads and my wrist in the process. All that just to find the guts of the pedal are SMD wrapped in a PITA. I guess I'll just buy a new one after all...
    Well I can't give a guy a "thumbsdown" for posting this. But the idea would have been that this is a bummer.

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    "In fact when I run into problems working on electronic circuirts, there are so many times that when I finally track it down, the source of the problem is located between my soldering iron and my seat." SoulFetish

    "Now get off my lawn with your silicooties and boom-chucka speakers and computers masquerading as amplifiers" Justin Thomas

    "Being born on third base and thinking that you must have hit a triple is pure delusion!" Steve A

  25. #25
    Senior Member SoulFetish's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    1,322
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 473/1
    Given: 407/0
    Rep Power
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by Helmholtz View Post
    With somewhat worn screwheads a (well fitting) screwdriver with a diamond coated tip can help to avoid slippage and further damage.
    That's what I prefer to use on vintage instruments.

    When lots of torque are required angled screwdrivers can be helpful.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0297.JPG 
Views:	13 
Size:	616.8 KB 
ID:	56640
    That top screwdriver look like a Wera. Kraftform Stainless, right?
    I've heard some great reports on their quality from trusted friends. I've been looking at getting a set of Hex Plus from them.

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    If I have a 50% chance of guessing the right answer, I guess wrong 80% of the time.

  26. #26
    Supporting Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    2,750
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 2,082/1
    Given: 1,186/2
    Rep Power
    5
    That top screwdriver look like a Wera.
    Yes, German brand Wera with diamond coated tip.

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    - Own Opinions Only -

  27. #27
    Supporting Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Nova Scotia
    Posts
    215
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 111/1
    Given: 256/1
    Rep Power
    4
    Just saw that Lee Valley has diamond-coated bits https://www.leevalley.com/en-ca/shop...16-diamond-tip

    Made in Germany, so likely Wera brand as they do carry some of their tools. Too bad, I was just there yesterday and I could have picked up a couple.

    That being said, a dedicated screwdriver would be nicer. The Wera handles are really good for being able to transmit a lot of torque easily.

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  28. #28
    Supporting Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    3,702
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 412/0
    Given: 67/0
    Rep Power
    14
    I have some Kamasa diamond coated bits in Phillips and JIS. Really good performance and have been as durable as the Wera ones.

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  29. #29
    Supporting Member Jazz P Bass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Wernersville, PA
    Posts
    13,038
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 592/3
    Given: 307/0
    Rep Power
    28
    Here is a good history on the 'Phillips' screwdriver: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R-mDqKtivuI

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  30. #30
    Supporting Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Staffordshire UK
    Posts
    3,822
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 562/1
    Given: 487/2
    Rep Power
    18
    The Wera diamond coated posidrive bits were my choice for hex drivers (manual and electric) a while ago, but I came to the view that they still wore out and so worked out rather expensive. I tried a 25 box of regular DeWalt posi bits for half the price of a single Wera bit and found that each bit seemed to give almost as good a life and performance as Wera, I'm not even halfway through them yet. As soon as one gets even slightly rounded I can just replace it, whereas I was trying to carry on using the Wera bits long after they should have been replaced, due to their cost.

    1 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  31. #31
    Supporting Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    2,750
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 2,082/1
    Given: 1,186/2
    Rep Power
    5
    I avoid using an electric drill on delicate equipment. Each single slippage wears the edges of the bit and the screw head - increasing the risk for future slippage. Using a fitting manual diamond coated screwdriver allows me to (almost) completely avoid slippage. I have had this Wera screwdriver for over 10 years now - but I only use it where required. A screwdriver that never slipped lasts forever.

    2 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    Last edited by Helmholtz; 01-15-2020 at 11:32 PM.
    - Own Opinions Only -

  32. #32
    Supporting Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Staffordshire UK
    Posts
    3,822
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 562/1
    Given: 487/2
    Rep Power
    18
    Yes, totally agree, manual only for delicate stuff.
    To my shame I lack sufficient organisation / discipline, tools get used for general DIY service as required.

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  33. #33
    Supporting Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    3,702
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 412/0
    Given: 67/0
    Rep Power
    14
    +1.

    I never use an electric driver around anything delicate either. I have an old Gordon (Sheffield) driver that takes bits, though I do prefer a dedicated screwdriver overall.

    2 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  34. #34
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Cheshire, UK
    Posts
    2,295
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 596/4
    Given: 308/0
    Rep Power
    16
    Yes, electric drill drivers are great for building stud walls and putting up plasterboard where you have hundreds of screws to drive but I would never use an electric driver on electronics. A manual posi driver lasts for ever because it never slips. I'm not sure about Phillips as they were designed to slip (cam out). I like the way posidriv screws stay attached to the bit even when horizontal so you only need one hand to insert them.

    1 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  35. #35
    Don't forget the joker g1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Canada, somewhere north of Fargo
    Posts
    12,207
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 1,947/24
    Given: 4,918/11
    Rep Power
    24
    There is a big difference between an electric drill and a real cordless screwdriver. Not sure which you are all speaking of.
    My cordless screwdriver has a lock, so I can manually start the screws, then power out the rest of the way. It also has a pivot, so it can be straight like a regular screw driver, or pistol style depending on the pivot setting.
    Most electric drills are quite cumbersome, the battery type usually have a huge battery on the bottom. Not good as screwdrivers.

    I got a real nice Snap-on ratcheting screw driver long ago. The Phillips bits have little barbs on the fins to prevent slippage. Does anyone know what these kind of bits are called?

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    "Everything is better with a tube. I have a customer with an all-tube pacemaker. His heartbeat is steady, reassuring and dependable, not like a modern heartbeat. And if it goes wrong he can fix it himself. You can't do that with SMD." - Mick Bailey

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. How do I rust new screws?
    By Axtman in forum Maintenance, Troubleshooting & Repair
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 05-28-2013, 07:56 AM
  2. How can I sexy up these screws?
    By rhgwynn in forum Pickup Makers
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 03-14-2013, 06:56 PM
  3. P90 Pole screws
    By SpareRibs in forum Beginner/ Hobbyist
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-27-2012, 10:29 PM
  4. Baffle screws
    By RudeBoy in forum Cabinetry
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 01-18-2010, 08:40 AM
  5. Warning regarding screws
    By ShannonH in forum Pickup Makers
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 05-10-2008, 06:14 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •