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GT/Sovtek ecc83 socket problem

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  • GT/Sovtek ecc83 socket problem

    Hi folks

    Is the 9 pin socket for an ecc83 valve a standard size? I have just built a little Champ style amp.

    My GT badged Sovtek 12AX7wc pre-amp tube is too fat for the socket/shielding can I am using.

    https://valvetubeguitaramps.com/prod...-12ax7wc-pair/

    This is the socket:

    https://www.cricklewoodelectronics.c...D/B9asComp.jpg

    I could probably widen the base to get it in, but I am concerned that the tube glass will be touching the metal of the socket. Would that matter!

    Can anyone advise and/or recommend an alternative shielded socket that might work with the GT/Sovtek?

    Cheers

    Steve

  • #2
    Originally posted by Steve Blackdog View Post
    Hi folks

    Is the 9 pin socket for an ecc83 valve a standard size? I have just built a little Champ style amp.

    My GT badged Sovtek 12AX7wc pre-amp tube is too fat for the socket/shielding can I am using.

    https://valvetubeguitaramps.com/prod...-12ax7wc-pair/

    This is the socket:

    https://www.cricklewoodelectronics.c...D/B9asComp.jpg

    I could probably widen the base to get it in, but I am concerned that the tube glass will be touching the metal of the socket. Would that matter!

    Can anyone advise and/or recommend an alternative shielded socket that might work with the GT/Sovtek?

    Cheers

    Steve
    My advice is unless you mounting your tube upside down and need to hold it in, don't use that type of socket. They use the shittiest metal on those things, and basically just radiate heat right back to the tubes. Plus, I've seen those springs damage the glass envelope in some cases. Every time I have to reinstall one of those shields back on the socket, it feels like nails on a chalkboard.
    But, it's only one man's humble opinion. I'm not here just to crap on your tube socket.
    If you must use a shield, or cover for your tubes, these are the ones to treat yourself too.


    Tube Shields
    If I have a 50% chance of guessing the right answer, I guess wrong 80% of the time.

    Comment


    • #3
      That’s what I was thinking. There was nothing nice about that socket. As we all know “buy cheap, buy twice” - a lesson I forget more than remember.

      I cut back the flange (thin as tin foil!) so the valve goes in properly. You can still get the sleeve on Ok. I will replace it when I get the time.

      Thanks for your help!

      As we all like photos- here’s the finished amp - you can see where I clipped back the socket. Now I just need to turn it on and test it!

      Cheers

      Steve
      Attached Files

      Comment


      • #4
        They use the shittiest metal on those things
        Don't know what shitty metal means in this context. Traditionally Fender used steel shields, Marshall, Hiwatt, Vox used aluminum shields and Mesa used nickel-silver shields. All of them were shiny and IR reflective on the inside and worked just fine. All it takes is conductive material that connects to ground.
        Tube shields can improve stability and noise rejection especially in high gain amps. I recommend to use them.
        - Own Opinions Only -

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Helmholtz View Post
          Don't know what shitty metal means in this context. Traditionally Fender used steel shields, Marshall, Hiwatt, Vox used aluminum shields and Mesa used nickel-silver shields.
          let me clarify and add some context.. The "shitty" I'm referring to has to do with the quality of metal and machining in the manufacturing, not the type of metal used. While I'm not a big fan of this style of tube shield, almost every new production tube/shield socket of this type is complete garbage compared to the type used in vintage fenders, marshalls, etc. (in my experience).
          One need only pull a shield cap of a JCM800 or 70's twin and compare that to one of the New Sensor types the OP is talking about and the difference is clear.


          All of them were shiny and IR reflective on the inside and worked just fine. All it takes is conductive material that connects to ground.
          Right. All it takes is a flat black finish on the insides of shields to aid in Heat dissipation instead of compounding it. It's incredibly simple and it would make for a better design.
          Yeah, they made for decent shields. But fender and Marshall did a lot of things, not all of them were great ideas just because they manage to get away with it for years.

          Tube shields can improve stability and noise rejection especially in high gain amps. I recommend to use them.
          I agree. I just recommend using good ones.
          If I have a 50% chance of guessing the right answer, I guess wrong 80% of the time.

          Comment


          • #6
            All it takes is a flat black finish on the insides of shields to aid in Heat dissipation instead of compounding it. It's incredibly simple and it would make for a better design.
            I don't think that tube temperature increase by tube shield heat reflection is a concern in typical guitar/audio equipment.

            BTW, the bulb temperature limit for a ECC83 is a very high 170°C. I haven't found any info on temperature derating, so I expect the spec data to apply up to this limit.
            I do admit, though, that any temperature increase generally accelerates degenerative processes and thus the probability of failure.
            But for any assessment the first thing to know would be the actual bulb temperature increase caused by the shield.
            Last edited by Helmholtz; 03-02-2020, 09:36 PM.
            - Own Opinions Only -

            Comment


            • #7
              If you don’t have hum you don’t need it. I prefer ceramic sockets with a wire retainer. About $2.

              Comment


              • #8
                takes all kinds, I guess
                If I have a 50% chance of guessing the right answer, I guess wrong 80% of the time.

                Comment

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