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Early Boss CE-2 Ticking

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  • #16
    The ticking actually should be there whether the effect is "on" or "off".

    LFO ticking occurs because the standard 2-op-amp LFO produces a square wave and then smoothes that out into a triangle for modulation purposes. The initial square wave produces a sudden current draw, which is heard as a spike on the power line shared with any other parts of the circuit, including the audio path.

    If it was the case that the CE-2 was true bypassed, then when "off" the straight wire would be unaffected by any nonsense going on with the power line. HOWEVER, the CE-2, like indeed the vast majority of chorus pedals, keeps most of the audio path in circuit, during both bypass and effect modes, and simply uses a single FET to disable the wet signal for "bypass". Any spikes on the supply line are experienced by the dry path as well.

    De-ticking such pedals benefits from a multi-pronged approach. One prong is certainly to use a low-current op-amp, like a TL062, TL022, or LM358 - commonly used in such applications - such that the current-draw is reduced. A second prong is to decouple the supply line for the LFO-dedicated chip from the overall supply line. So, normally, the V+ pin (pin 8) of the chip would be tied directly to the 9V supply. To decouple it, one would insert a small-value fixed resistor between pin 8 and V+, like 10-100R, in tandem with a medium-small electrolytic cap value (10-33uf) from pin 8 to ground. Think of the RC combo as being a bit like a micro-battery or pocket money. If what you want to buy is cheap enough, then pocket money is sufficient and you don't have to go to the bank or ATM. If the expense is big enough, though, you DO have to resort to a deeper current-well, like the bank. IOf teh current stored in the cap is enough for the chip to produce that initial square wave, then there is no draw on the overall supply, and no spike/tick produced.

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    • #17
      Yes the ticking was happening battery or power supply. I swapped the 4558 for a TL022 per Mark's instructions and the ticking stopped. I seem to have my volume back as well. Pedal sounds amazing. Thank you all for your suggestions. Now if I could just figure out this Line 6 echo park power problem...

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      • #18
        Great to hear! Or should I say, great to NOT hear?

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        • #19
          Hello...my CE-2 doesn't do anything like that. But my Boss PH-1R has this quiet pulse sound in the background which increases with the rate knob. But no volume drop in either pedal that I notice at least. It's low enough that it's not very noticeable. I wouldn't describe mine as a tick though. Like an electronic heart beat pulse lol.

          It's so very low in volume that I honestly wouldn't be surprised if most people have the same issue but don't realize it. Keep in mind the are 3 decade old pedals and not true bypass so the sounds runs through the inner circuitry. Not to say yours should have a tick but I'm not shocked mine slightly pulse with the rate knob.My CE-2 doesn't do anything like that. But my Boss PH-1R has this quiet pulse sound in the background which increases with the rate knob. But no volume drop in either pedal that I notice at least. It's low enough that it's not very noticeable. I wouldn't describe mine as a tick though. Like an electronic heart beat pulse lol.

          It's so very low in volume that I honestly wouldn't be surprised if most people have the same issue but don't realize it. Keep in mind the are 3 decade old pedals and not true bypass so the sounds runs through the inner circuitry. Not to say yours should have a tick but I'm not shocked mine slightly pulse with the rate knob.

          pcb quote
          Last edited by MelliLewis; 10-19-2020, 09:36 PM.

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          • #20
            I took notice that the PH-1R uses a TL022 opamp for the rate, as Mark suggested.
            I also see a 15uf/ 16 V tantalum capacitor on the one output pin.
            You may want to try changing that one out.
            (schematic compliments of R G Keen)
            Attached Files

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