Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Will I Hear A Difference?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Will I Hear A Difference?

    I have a an all original, played hard and rode hard '68 Fender Telecaster bass. The tone pot is scratchy and both pots are a little sketchy feeling. I've tried cleaning the tone pot with high grade cleaner to no avail. I'm nervous about playing it on stage fearing its reliability or that something might come apart. I'm thinking of carefully removing all of the electronics, including the jack and control plate and droipping in all new high quality components. My question is whether this would improve the sound of the bass - make it sound more like it may have in 1968?

  • #2
    I suspect that in 1968, the controls were less scratchy than they are now, so certainly replacing or repairing them is a step towards restoration.

    Cleaning alone will not necessarily eliminate noisiness, since pot scratchiness is a dual function of both acquired dirt (which you CAN clean out), and erosion of the resistive strip (which you can't). Many folks here will recommend the one-two punch of Caig DeOxit and Stabilant 22. The DeOxit will remove stuff on the surface, and the Stabilant will effectively resurface. It is a contact enhancer that provides a non-drying electro-conductive layer that functions like a liquid solder joint. I've seen it work some miracles. Unfortunately, because it does not dry, you can not build up layers, so if the gap the electrons have to cross is too big (pot's resistive strip is severely worn), it won't be enough to eliminate scratchiness. Within limits, it's terrific stuff, but it has its limits. I was fortunate to buy up a fistful of little 0.5ml vials cheap, from a local place. Normally, it can be quite pricey...but worth it.

    Would it be sufficient to restore a 1968 pot? I don't know. Maybe. A 1968 wah-wah, most likely not. But a bass pot may not have been rotated quite as much in the intervening period. You can read more here: Amazon.com: Stabilant 22, 5ml Kit Makes 30ml of 22A: Everything Else

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by howarda View Post
      I have a an all original, played hard and rode hard '68 Fender Telecaster bass. The tone pot is scratchy and both pots are a little sketchy feeling. I've tried cleaning the tone pot with high grade cleaner to no avail. I'm nervous about playing it on stage fearing its reliability or that something might come apart. I'm thinking of carefully removing all of the electronics, including the jack and control plate and droipping in all new high quality components. My question is whether this would improve the sound of the bass - make it sound more like it may have in 1968?
      It should help.
      If it has 250 CTS pots, like these.
      Mojotone CTS 250K Guitar Potentiometer Solid Shaft
      You should be able to put your dated Covers on these.
      Is this the one piece Pickup, or the split P style?


      "If Wishes Were Horses, Beggars Would Ride!" Scottish Proverb 1600s
      Terry

      Comment


      • #4
        Or find another old CTS pot and swap the covers. Most of us who have done restorations get pretty deft at making usable pots out of pieces of pots. Many times the wiper is worn out as well.

        Comment


        • #5
          It has the the single coil pickup.

          Comment


          • #6
            Answering your original question, using new good quality parts will make it more reliable and probably remove some noise caused by track wear and maybe metallic parts corrosion.
            It will "improve" its sound by way of removing poor contacts.
            Will boutique parts make it sound "more 1968"?
            Not at all, you *already* have the '68 Bass itself.
            Juan Manuel Fahey

            Comment


            • #7
              Sounds like you have more than got your moneys worth.
              As long as the Neck frets hold up, and it intonates?
              All of the rest of it can be upgraded and replaced.
              Necks can be refretted, Pickups can be rebuilt.
              Not much to go wrong on a single pickup two knob AX.
              T


              "If Wishes Were Horses, Beggars Would Ride!" Scottish Proverb 1600s
              Terry

              Comment


              • #8
                Are you changing the control plate because you want to keep the old parts on it, or because you think that will improve something? I'd leave the old plate on the bass for looks.
                It would be possible to describe everything scientifically, but it would make no sense; it would be without meaning, as if you described a Beethoven symphony as a variation of wave pressure. Albert Einstein


                http://coneyislandguitars.com
                www.soundcloud.com/davidravenmoon

                Comment


                • #9
                  I'm wanting to replace the controls as a single unit to keep them intact.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by howarda View Post
                    I'm wanting to replace the controls as a single unit to keep them intact.
                    Can't figure out quite what you mean by that.

                    I'm the proud owner of an almost identical bass (April 68 Tele bass with Seth Lover HB in mid position). I'd recommend replacing the volume & tone pots & why not put in a fresh output jack & tone cap, if you're worried about any of those failing onstage. Improvement in sound? well the scratchy sketchy pots will be gone. I don't know what value the volume pot is, but say it's 250K, you could swap in a 500K and gain a little brightness if you want. And the peace of mind - knowing your new parts are in & working = priceless.

                    Save the old parts in case some wild-eyed "collector" offers you a deal you can't refuse - I mean a big sack full o' cash for your ax.
                    This isn't the future I signed up for.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      "Can't figure out quite what you mean by that."

                      These are definitely sought after and somewhat collectible basses. I plan to pull out all the electronics with control plate, sans the pickups and keep them intact. Then if I ever decide to sell it, I'll do so with the original electronics to keep the value.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Changing the pickup out for something else is the only thing that may alter the sound. If you can find a '68 pickup that would make perfect sense, otherwise a boutique clone may be your best bet.
                        Now Trending: China has found a way to turn stupidity into money!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by howarda View Post
                          "Can't figure out quite what you mean by that."

                          These are definitely sought after and somewhat collectible basses. I plan to pull out all the electronics with control plate, sans the pickups and keep them intact. Then if I ever decide to sell it, I'll do so with the original electronics to keep the value.
                          That's not a bad plan.
                          Guys do that all the time with Vintage Strat Pick Guards.
                          They Just take the pick guard off and put it in a safe place, then put a new one on with new parts, and pickups, wound the way they want them.
                          You can do the same with the pickup and control plate if you like.
                          It's Your bass, do what you want to with it.


                          "If Wishes Were Horses, Beggars Would Ride!" Scottish Proverb 1600s
                          Terry

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X