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"IC Op-amp Cookbook" by Walter G. Yung (3rd edition 1986)

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  • "IC Op-amp Cookbook" by Walter G. Yung (3rd edition 1986)

    "IC Op-amp Cookbook" by Walter G. Yung (3rd edition 1986)
    Buy It Now $14 with free shipping as of 06/26 (this book usually sells for around $30 with shipping.)

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Ic-Op-Amp-Co...i:172236343856

    I found an earlier edition of this book to be very helpful back in the 80s when I was building all of the Craig Anderton projects. (I just ordered a copy of the 3rd edition from Amazon because I haven't seen my old book for years and I've been screwing around with SS amps and FX pedals for awhile now.)

    Not to insult the author but I considered his book to be like the Dan Torres guitar amp book only for op-amps with hundreds of real world examples as opposed to very thick theory with just a few examples.

    Steve Ahola
    The Blue Guitar
    www.blueguitar.org
    Some recordings:
    https://soundcloud.com/sssteeve/sets...e-blue-guitar/
    .

  • #2
    Back in the mid 70s as a kid I made lots of projects using 741 opamps for equipment that was either unavailable or rediculously expensive at the time. I made electronic crossovers to Biamp the band's PA, etc. The project I remember the most was a graphic equalizer. I finished it at 3 am and had to try it of course in that PA. I accidentally made some kind of oscillator that sounded like a jet taking off. It woke up all of the neighborhood and summoned the police....
    olddawg
    Old Timer
    Last edited by olddawg; 06-27-2016, 03:20 AM.

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    • #3
      It was my Bible too.
      Eventually progressed to not needing it any more, straight designing what I needed, consider it similar to guitaristīs "6000 chord books" (which were also popular way back then) but it sure was a comforting help.

      Iīd definitely buy another copy, also lost mine decades ago.

      I know, I know, itīs definitely "somewhere" in my overflowing-with-junk home/shop ... just try finding it .
      Juan Manuel Fahey

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      • #4
        Another thing I learned quickly was to always crowbar the input of anything I built with 4 diodes. That limited the input signal to a little over 1 vrms so I wouldn't pop the damn opamps. Some of the old mixing boards like Tapcos would put out a 10v signal!
        olddawg
        Old Timer
        Last edited by olddawg; 06-27-2016, 07:21 PM.

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        • #5
          My copy is less than three feet from my left hand. It may be an old book, but op amp principles have not changed, only the common IC type numbers. Certainly there are worse ways to learn how op amps work.

          That sits on my shelf next to the TTL Cookbook, and the CMOS Cookbook.
          Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Enzo View Post
            My copy is less than three feet from my left hand. It may be an old book, but op amp principles have not changed, only the common IC type numbers. Certainly there are worse ways to learn how op amps work.

            That sits on my shelf next to the TTL Cookbook, and the CMOS Cookbook.
            I have the same ones, and my Jung books are autographed! I was fortunate enough to meet and talk with him a number of years ago.

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