Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

I want to use this type of hookup wire for the rest of my life and nothing else

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • I want to use this type of hookup wire for the rest of my life and nothing else

    (with the caveat, that I'm soldering and not crimping )

    Okay, if you've ever done even a couple of transformer installs you've probably seen it. I'm looking to restock on some hookup wire, and I'm hoping that you might be able to tell me if there is a any industry type identifiable standard for this type of tinned wire.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_6625.jpg Views:	0 Size:	1.20 MB ID:	939528

    what's great about it is that it's pre-tinned, has the flexibility of stranded wire, strips with ease, with the ability to preform through hole soldering easily and quickly.
    You know what I mean? After working with wire like this, I hate using wire with individually tinned strands unless I need ultra flexibility, or I'm crimping.
    Anyone know what it's called?
    If I have a 50% chance of guessing the right answer, I guess wrong 80% of the time.

  • #2
    I haven't any answer to what it's called (maybe pre-tinned stranded?) or where to score rolls of it, BUT I do save my off-cuts from transformer installs. Nice 600V sometimes 1000V insulation, reasonably flexible, kandy kolors, some with stripes, some of it nice large gauge from filament windings. There's a coffee can full at the end of the bench, next to the 'scope, ready to hand.
    This isn't the future I signed up for.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Leo_Gnardo View Post
      I haven't any answer to what it's called (maybe pre-tinned stranded?) or where to score rolls of it, BUT I do save my off-cuts from transformer installs. Nice 600V sometimes 1000V insulation, reasonably flexible, kandy kolors, some with stripes, some of it nice large gauge from filament windings. There's a coffee can full at the end of the bench, next to the 'scope, ready to hand.
      Dude, that's my favorite part of doing transformer installs. It's like when you order passive components from Mouser and they ship them in the most amazing plastic bags to store stuff in.
      If I have a 50% chance of guessing the right answer, I guess wrong 80% of the time.

      Comment


      • #4
        Maybe something like this kind?

        Details20-GA stranded wire can be used as hook up wire in most amplifier applications. The PVC coated wire is durable and easy to work with. The pre-tinned wire will hold it's shape should you need to bend or twist the wire in to a tight place.Made in USAUL-1015, 600v
        When the going gets weird... The weird turn pro!

        Comment


        • #5
          After a little research... That stranded wire tinned together seems to be referred to as " unistrand", "uni strand" or "uni-strand" with some small regularity. It's available for decent, though not low prices. I would email any vendor I was considering to ask if the jacket is "irradiated pvc". This is actually important. The cheaper, non irradiated stuff shrinks back like crazy when the iron hits the wire.

          I just use the regular individually tinned stranded wire with irradiated pvc jacket. And I've tried a BUNCH of different hookup wire types. The stuff I use seems to give the most predictably good performance for a normal price. I don't even know the brand name.?. But I know what it is and I go through it slowly. So...

          Look for unistrand/uni strand/uni-strand with an irradiated pvc jacket.
          "Take two placebos, works twice as well." Enzo

          "Now get off my lawn with your silicooties and boom-chucka speakers and computers masquerading as amplifiers" Justin Thomas

          "Being born on third base and thinking that you must have hit a triple is pure delusion!" Steve A

          Comment


          • #6
            I think you might be talking about "bonded" wire....

            Like this? Maybe?

            https://www.nationalwire.com/pdf/NABOND.pdf

            If it ain't broke I'll fix it until it is...
            I have just enough knowledge to be dangerous...

            Comment


            • #7
              I also use and like the topcoat hookup wire from mojotone.com and tubesandmore.com
              --
              I build and repair guitar amps
              http://amps.monkeymatic.com

              Comment


              • #8
                I have some of that wire. I agree it is great to work with - must more flexible than solid core, but has the benefits of solid core. No need to worry able stray whiskers either.

                I got mine from some central heating controls, Honeywell Diverter Valves. They use multi core flex, which has donated a good selection of differently coloured wires.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Once you use teflon wire, everything else is garbage. I'm used to using it at work but wouldn't want to pay what they pay. Silver plated teflon wire is the cats ass. I scored 2 full boxes of ptfe for $50 a few years back , awg, 20,22,24,26

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I don't remember the last time I had to buy hookup wire, unless it was cloth covered from mojotone. I also keep bags of tranny and other wire scraps handy. The tranny wire is my fave as well, and it's the best for splicing.
                    It's weird, because it WAS working fine.....

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Nice work on digging up some leads and info. I've done some exhaustive searching and the industry nomenclature seems to include Prebond–which is twisted tinned wire and tinned throughout the core, Topcoat (and overcoat)–which is twisted untinned copper wire, where the exterior of the core is tinned.
                      I like using UL rated and Mil-type wire designations, and it hasn't been easy to source any UL1431 (600V irradiated PVC insulator) in prebond or top coat. The most common is UL1015 and UL1015 MTL (machine tool wire), which is my preferred type of wire anyway. I'm used to it, and don't really run into issues with melting the insulator anymore.
                      If I have a 50% chance of guessing the right answer, I guess wrong 80% of the time.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I’ve noticed a lot of good reports on the topcoat wire from Valvestorm https://valvestorm.com/Products/Wire
                        My band:- http://www.youtube.com/user/RedwingBand

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          In as far as doing repairs that get billed hourly, there are two things that I don't want spend my time doing anymore. The first is digging through a container of assorted washers/nuts/bolts looking for the piece of hardware I need. The other is looking through a box of wire clippings for the wire I want to use in the color/gauge I need.
                          I get it. I'm pretty cheap ultimately, and I'll save salvage parts and pieces; bags from Mouser; boxes from items shipped to me - to name a few.
                          But for certain things that I use all the time, ie. the 2 sizes of heyco strain reliefs for heavy and lighter gauge round power cords; 18-22 600V hookup wire (Always need black... never have black); 470Ω screen resistors; 3/8" internal tooth lock washers; 8-32 everything; M6 various lengths..... so many other things too
                          Anyways, I need things like these in stock and easy to find. This thread was helpful in that I could track down this wire in exactly,.... well, almost exactly the spec I wanted. We ordered some UL1015 18AWG black topcoat, and an assorted 22AWG topcoat colors. I would have preferred 20AWG, but I'm not going to split hairs on this one. We can get them all from the same vendor, and made it an easy pitch to my boss. Big win as far as I'm concerned.

                          pdf, the valvestorm wire looks to be about the same as the ones we ordered from CEdist.
                          If I have a 50% chance of guessing the right answer, I guess wrong 80% of the time.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by SoulFetish View Post
                            pdf, the valvestorm wire looks to be about the same as the ones we ordered from CEdist.
                            Likely valvestorm is easier/cheaper to ship in UK & Europe, while CE/Antique easier in US & maybe Canada. My best guess.
                            This isn't the future I signed up for.

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X