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What is your "go to" multimeter?

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  • #16
    Here are a couple of nice folding meters. They sell for about $1000 each, a little over my budget.

    https://music-electronics-forum.com/...1&d=1570458863
    Attached Files

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    • #17
      Mine is still Fluke 8060A 4.5 digit True RMS DMM, with dB, Rel mode, Freq. I have two of them, still working, though have to stay on top of the internal meter connections of the LCD display. On some test setups, I'll use an HP 3467A 4-Ch scanning DMM, though it is limited to 350VDC/250VAC.
      Logic is an organized way of going wrong with confidence

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      • #18
        That's a very well loved meter when you look around. I remember it being just a little out of my price range when I bought the 87. I think the LCD issue exists for the 87 as well since I saw many, including the one I bought, that had been refurbed with a new display.
        "Take two placebos, works twice as well." Enzo

        "Now get off my lawn with your silicooties and boom-chucka speakers and computers masquerading as amplifiers" Justin Thomas

        "Being born on third base and thinking that you must have hit a triple is pure delusion!" Steve A

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        • #19
          Those Gossen meters that dmeek posted look superb - I want one of each. I've just taken a look a the rest of the range and they have some really nice equipment and it's interesting that high-end analogue meters are still being produced.

          It really is a sign of old age where a chap moves from drooling over lingerie models to drooling over test equipment.

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          • #20
            Just in the shop tonight and this Tenma resistor/capacitor meter was struggling to read a 22 ohm resistor. It read the 4.7k just fine, probably battery low. So bust out the Fluke 189 and no issues. Definitely my go to meter but I like to share the use with my cheaper meters.
            When the going gets weird... The weird turn pro!

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            • #21
              I just put new jacks in my Fluke 87--looks almost new again! And I have an 8060 in a drawer that needs help, but still works. I also picked up a DE5000 LCR for more precise component testing. And a Rigol scope that is much more portable than my old Techtronics ever thought of being. Never leave home without it!

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              • #22
                Did someone say Micronta?

                I don't remember when I got this, but it was a really long time ago. Volts, milliamps and ohms with a manual range switch. Model 22-198U:

                Click image for larger version

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                -tb

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                • #23
                  Then there's this old soldier, model 22-214:

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                  -tb

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                  • #24
                    I used to support the notion that meters are all the same... Wow was I ever wrong !!! I went through 4 or 5 cheap discount store meters in the span of two years, and that's how long it's taken me to get smart and not waste time on junk.

                    I don't think they can take high voltage DC, regardless of what the dial says (1,000v), and the internal fuses are not blown, so it's not that, they are just junk.

                    I am using a cheap but seemingly better Harbor Freight unit (Cen-Tech) at the moment and for the last 6 months, but I have to buy a really good one, perhaps with auto ranging, although that is not mandatory.
                    https://www.harborfreight.com/11-fun...SABEgLjIvD_BwE

                    I will pay attention to what you gents say on this thread, and go out shopping for a new one.
                    " Things change, not always for the better. " - Leo_Gnardo

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                    • #25
                      Maybe one of the "old timers" can answer this one for me. Taut-band meter? We had a very nice 'taut band' Triplett VOM on the bench at the workshop at my college. The needle always took its good ol' time settling into place. Not a meter that would follow fast changes in voltage, for sure. OTOH the needle never jittered around, it sort of showed the average reading is my best guess. Can anyone explain?
                      Enjoy. Every. Sandwich.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by tboy View Post
                        I don't remember when I got this, but it was a really long time ago. Volts, milliamps and ohms with a manual range switch. Model 22-198U:

                        [ATTACH=CONFIG]55486[/ATTACH]
                        I still have one of those!
                        "Yeah, well, you know, that's just, like, your opinion, man."

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                        • #27
                          I had no idea that Gossen manufactured multimeters. Back in the day they made some of the best photographic light meters. I used to work on them all the time.
                          Drewline

                          When was the last time you did something for the first time?

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Drewline View Post
                            I had no idea that Gossen manufactured multimeters. Back in the day they made some of the best photographic light meters. I used to work on them all the time.
                            Likewise. Still use my Gossen Luna Pro SBC & Luna Sphere.
                            Logic is an organized way of going wrong with confidence

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Leo_Gnardo View Post
                              Maybe one of the "old timers" can answer this one for me. Taut-band meter? We had a very nice 'taut band' Triplett VOM on the bench at the workshop at my college. The needle always took its good ol' time settling into place. Not a meter that would follow fast changes in voltage, for sure. OTOH the needle never jittered around, it sort of showed the average reading is my best guess. Can anyone explain?
                              My meter, the Heathkit IM-104 is slow too, it's still a mystery to me as to why. I think the main advantage with taut band meters is that there are no pivot bearings, so no friction. The reading is more repeatable
                              and not sensitive to meter position horizontal or vertical.

                              I'll just add a little nugget of information that's been very helpful to me. If your needle is sticking because of static buildup on the plastic window, remove the window and wash it in warm soapy water.
                              Then let dry - DO NOT RINSE. The soap film will kill the static. I have to do this every 4 years or so.
                              Last edited by dmeek; 10-11-2019, 12:30 AM.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Mick Bailey View Post
                                For everything else I use an ancient Beckman Industrial HD110 that's still in perfect condition and is rated at 1500v.
                                You don't have a spare LCD for that baby do you? I have a 310 (same as HD series) but the display got broken. Great meter. I have a spare multi-processor and the service manual if you need anything.

                                My main meter is a Meterman 37XR. I was also recently given a heathkit IM-32 VTVM that needs a bit of work and a needle cover.
                                "Everything is better with a tube. I have a customer with an all-tube pacemaker. His heartbeat is steady, reassuring and dependable, not like a modern heartbeat. And if it goes wrong he can fix it himself. You can't do that with SMD." - Mick Bailey

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