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Does it work for $30?

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  • Does it work for $30?

    $30 desoldering station...

    https://saltycorn.com/products/desoldering-suction-pump

  • #2
    That's a good price!
    Hopefully someone here will buy and review it!
    T


    "If Wishes Were Horses, Beggars Would Ride!" Scottish Proverb 1600s
    Terry

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    • #3
      that thing shouldn't cost more than 15...i have one...it has less power than a good soldering station and the sucking pressure is not that great ,especially after it starts to clog up.
      If you plan to make a lot of caps/jacks removal its better to get a proper desoldering station,otherwise get a good manual pump like the big blue one

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      • #4
        I have a similar one that I got from Amazon for even cheaper, don't know the difference. On mine I find it doesn't get hot enough to loosen up some joints, especially lead free. I rarely use it but sometimes will use it along with my regular iron. I melt the solder with the regular iron and then use the vacuum iron to keep it at temp at suck out the solder.

        That being said, I just did my first SMD removal using Chip Quik. That stuff rocks! I've read it is also good for getting those really tough through hole solder joints on multi-layer boards.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by glebert View Post
          I have a similar one that I got from Amazon for even cheaper, don't know the difference. On mine I find it doesn't get hot enough to loosen up some joints, especially lead free. I rarely use it but sometimes will use it along with my regular iron. I melt the solder with the regular iron and then use the vacuum iron to keep it at temp at suck out the solder.

          That being said, I just did my first SMD removal using Chip Quik. That stuff rocks! I've read it is also good for getting those really tough through hole solder joints on multi-layer boards.
          I always used a Pace Station. A Hako chip remover. Solder braid and Chip Quick. Depending on the situation. Never cared much for hand pumps.

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          • #6
            I'm just a hobbyist, and that might be good for an occasional de-solder.
            T
            **Here's one for $18.
            With free delivery, if you have prime.
            https://www.amazon.com/Tenma-21-8240...3955806&sr=8-5


            "If Wishes Were Horses, Beggars Would Ride!" Scottish Proverb 1600s
            Terry

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            • #7
              $11
              https://www.aliexpress.com/item/4000...0cce11947d9-43

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              • #8
                I would have to say if you bought one of those you would be disappointed. I'm glad I made the step up to the electric vacuum on the pace. i do still keep the edsyn solda pullits for just in case.
                nosaj
                Binkie McFartnuggets‏:If we really wanted to know the meaning of life we would have fed Stephen Hawking shrooms a long time ago.

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                • #9
                  Yeah these have been around forever. I’ve seen them “ converted” by connecting a vacuum source to the extraction tube. I knew one guy that did it with 2 big water bottles. As water poured from on to the other it created a vacuum. Then he would reverse the bottles. I posted this one because people were talking about inexpensive extractors.

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                  • #10
                    Most of the professional units have a vacuum motor, but Pace used to (don't know if they still do or not) make units that ran on shop air. production facilities with air could plumb that to the benches, and it made vacuum inside the station.
                    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Enzo View Post
                      Most of the professional units have a vacuum motor, but Pace used to (don't know if they still do or not) make units that ran on shop air. production facilities with air could plumb that to the benches, and it made vacuum inside the station.
                      Yeah.. the Pace units I used always had electric motors and rebuildable diaphragm pumps. I do remember seeing the compressed air style units in the catalog. Always thought it would be great to have compressed air available on the benches. But we would usually bring the unit into the ally on a cart and blow it out with a portable compressor by the back door or use a shop vac with a brush. Kept the dust out of the shop.

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                      • #12
                        yeah, if I needed a quick blow out of something small, I'd grab the freezit or something. For cleaning, a shop vac hose and a soft paintbrush.
                        Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

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