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  • Amp modelling listening test

    Hey guys!

    I am conducting research I'm doing on why I believe guitarists should use digital Amp Modellers for guitar playing as opposed to analogue amplifiers. Therefore as part of this research I am conducting a listening test to see investigate whether guitarists are able to distinguish between the sound of real amps and digital amp modellers, Whether guitarists prefer the sound of amp modellers as opposed to analogue amps and whether guitarists agree the sound of amp modellers are appropriate for industry standard guitar playing, so I would like you guys to complete this questionnaire/listening test as it will benefit this research immensley. Also, make sure you carefully read the instructions before starting the test as it provides a link to the audio files to use during the test. Anyhow, thanks a lot guys!

    https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/ZCRRZWJ

  • #2
    Originally posted by Matt Cerveira View Post
    Hey guys!
    I am conducting research I'm doing on why I believe guitarists should use digital Amp Modellers for guitar playing as opposed to analogue amplifiers.
    Speaking strictly for myself the only accurate test of a guitar amp is how it sounds and responds to the nuances of your own playing and in my experience digital modeling falls short in that regard. Unless you are playing in a cover band and must reproduce the sounds on the original recordings a digital modeler will often fail to deliver the tone and response that a guitarist- in particular, a roots player like blues or country- may need.

    That being said there are new modeling amps and devices out which may cross that threshhold like the Kemper Profiling and the Marshall Code amps which I have not tried.

    Steve Ahola
    The Blue Guitar
    www.blueguitar.org
    Some recordings:
    https://soundcloud.com/sssteeve/sets...e-blue-guitar/
    .

    Comment


    • #3
      The modelers are getting closer all the time, not just tone but feel, interaction etc. I was recording a part using Amplitube 4 the other day (Jubillee model), and was surprised to have a sustained note gracefully transition into harmonic feedback, even though I was using headphones(!) and there was obviously no acoustic feedback happening. Some of the newer high-gain models will self-feedback connected with no input when you crank the gain and volume to max (just like a 6505+ &etc) -- perhaps a little too much realism!

      I still use a tube amp and pedals live, but in the studio, I'm using modelers more and more. It's certainly nice to be able to 'crank' it at midnight when the wife and neighbors are fast asleep.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by mhuss View Post
        The modelers are getting closer all the time, not just tone but feel, interaction etc. I was recording a part using Amplitube 4 the other day (Jubillee model), and was surprised to have a sustained note gracefully transition into harmonic feedback, even though I was using headphones(!) and there was obviously no acoustic feedback happening.
        I was complaining about modeling amps rather than computer-based amp modelers. Guitar Rig is pretty slick, too. Behringer sells a guitar interface for under $40 that includes a limited version of it. For home recording in an apt or condo you can't beat something like Amplitude plugged into a DAW.

        Modeling amps have a limited amount of RAM and ROM, largely wasted on amps and fx that we might never use whereas with a DAW you are only using the plug-ins you need.

        Steve Ahola
        The Blue Guitar
        www.blueguitar.org
        Some recordings:
        https://soundcloud.com/sssteeve/sets...e-blue-guitar/
        .

        Comment


        • #5
          Unless the various amps and amp models are coming out of a real guitar speaker cab at real guitar sound levels, the comparisons are rather pointless. Hearing them from computer speakers or even hifi speakers just is not the same.

          I will never get around to it, but Peavey's ReValver always sounded interesting. It is software that emulates a variety of circuits of popular amps. But it allows you to go so far as to change component values in the circuits.
          Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

          Comment


          • #6
            I have Revalver, but never have found the time to play with things at a component level, except for 20 minutes when I first got it.

            I have mixed feelings about 'real guitar sound levels.' There is certainly something about 'loud in the room' that no modeller can fully replace; however, these days we spend so much time avoiding being too loud on the stage or in the home studio, etc., that I'm not sure loud is still a good thing.

            And to the OP - playing guitar through an amp or modeller is all about interaction -- listening to clips of someone else playing can never allow one to fully form an opinion of same. I don't think many would still disagree that today's modellers can sound very good.

            Comment


            • #7
              Hi Matt Cerveira, did you notice Matheus Augusto is asking exactly the same here? http://music-electronics-forum.com/t42155/
              Or is Matheus Augusto another of your nicknames?
              Weird.

              Are you guys real?

              Is this some kind of advanced spambot?
              Juan Manuel Fahey

              Comment


              • #8
                The line "industry standard guitar playing" sort of says it all.
                I always advise beginners who just starting to get bookings and a rep to avoid modeling amps and heavy digital effect because it delays or retards developing a personal style. The only commercial value someone has is their style and depending on equipment to create a preproducible style means any kid with a credit card can be confused as to who it is, thereby killing the value of the player. If they don't developed their own style they are never going to earn more than the typical pickup sideman.
                Lounge acts and cruise ship bands which need to impersonate 30 different styles each evening can use modelers to good effect however. I know a guy who plays guitar, keys and sax as a karaoke DJ, where he plays along and sings to help really bad singers. He is popular with a certain drunk businessman type. His nightly gig for the last 18 years. He does a pretty good job impersonating a wide range of styles but he certainly would have an easier time doing it with one of the modelers. But people intent on playing their own music and trying to generate a career should avoid them.

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                • #9
                  Amen !

                  JJ

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