Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Keyboard for daughter

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Keyboard for daughter

    Nice to meet you, folks. Not sure if that's the right place but stil. I was choosing a keyboard for my daughter (10 years old), found this list: primesound.org/best-keyboard-kids
    But I am not a musician at all, neither my friends. So, I'd appreciate your thoughts or your experience. We have not much place for a piano. The teacher told us that 88 keys is a must, and nothing else matters. Is that true?
    Last edited by nosaj; 05-30-2020, 07:06 PM. Reason: edited hperlink

  • #2
    Smells like link building spam to me...
    Experience is something you get, just after you really needed it.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Robin_Hood View Post
      Nice to meet you, folks. Not sure if that's the right place but stil. I was choosing a keyboard for my daughter (10 years old), found this list: primesound.org/best-keyboard-kids
      But I am not a musician at all, neither my friends. So, I'd appreciate your thoughts or your experience. We have not much place for a piano. The teacher told us that 88 keys is a must, and nothing else matters. Is that true?
      Pretty much....kinda of like a bicycle anything more is bells and whistles. Learn to play on 88 keys and you can walk up to any piano and go to it.

      nosaj
      Last edited by nosaj; 05-31-2020, 01:00 AM. Reason: removed hyperlink
      Binkie McFartnuggets‏:If we really wanted to know the meaning of life we would have fed Stephen Hawking shrooms a long time ago.

      Comment


      • #4
        Keyboard for daughter? That doesn't seem like a fair swap. I'd want nosaj's bicycle thrown in as well, so long as really did have bells and whistles.

        Comment


        • #5
          If this is for "piano lessons" then weighted and velocity sensitive keys would be nice features. These are available on several affordable models I looked at. Though it may be tougher to find both those features in a keyboard with built in amplification. And that too would be a good feature for the time being.
          "Take two placebos, works twice as well." Enzo

          "Now get off my lawn with your silicooties and boom-chucka speakers and computers masquerading as amplifiers" Justin Thomas

          "Being born on third base and thinking that you must have hit a triple is pure delusion!" Steve A

          Comment


          • #6
            88 keys is a must? For a 10 year old? I know PLENTY of professuional keyboard men who play on common 63 note keyboards. How many songs need the last octave at either end?
            Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

            Comment


            • #7
              It may be for "proper" piano lessons. In which case the instructor may be getting snobby about it. But I agree in principal.
              "Take two placebos, works twice as well." Enzo

              "Now get off my lawn with your silicooties and boom-chucka speakers and computers masquerading as amplifiers" Justin Thomas

              "Being born on third base and thinking that you must have hit a triple is pure delusion!" Steve A

              Comment


              • #8
                Can a 10 year old even reach end to end on an 88?


                For kids, I always caution that they are kids, and while piano may seem really interesting now, a month later it is off the radar, and we now have a noce keyboard to sit potted plants on. I never advise someone to buy their kid a $4000 Gibson as a first guitar.

                I took piano for a few years when I was about 7 or 8 until maybe 11. Over 60 years ago, I still remember the theory, but can no longer sight read. Hell I don't even recall the notes on the clefs. But I always have fun with keyboards that come in, especially like the PSR series from Yamaha. Any with the accompaniment, more fun to play.

                When I first got a guitar, the friend I bought it from said"You will get frustrated at first." SO he showed me how to open tune the guitar, that way I can practice until I am tired of it. Then I can open tune and have a pleasing sound to strum and kinda makes the effort worth while. A fun keyboard might help a young learner get through the rough spots in similar fashion.

                Just my opinion.
                Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

                Comment


                • #9
                  nosaj, the link you edited out appears in your quote.
                  "Everything is better with a tube. I have a customer with an all-tube pacemaker. His heartbeat is steady, reassuring and dependable, not like a modern heartbeat. And if it goes wrong he can fix it himself. You can't do that with SMD." - Mick Bailey

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Enzo View Post
                    Can a 10 year old even reach end to end on an 88?
                    That made me laugh a little. I think they could, it would be difficult to play though. Fun to watch But then I don't think playing at both ends simultaneously happens that often. Even adult players scootch back and forth to get onto the keys. That's why there's a flat, smooth bench instead of a stool I suppose.
                    "Take two placebos, works twice as well." Enzo

                    "Now get off my lawn with your silicooties and boom-chucka speakers and computers masquerading as amplifiers" Justin Thomas

                    "Being born on third base and thinking that you must have hit a triple is pure delusion!" Steve A

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I recall a story, and I am pretty sure it was Rachmaninov, that the guy had a very wide reach - long fingers - like an octave and a half or something. And he purposely wrote songs that relied on that reach so that average players would have difficulty playing.
                      Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Enzo View Post
                        I recall a story, and I am pretty sure it was Rachmaninov, that the guy had a very wide reach - long fingers - like an octave and a half or something. And he purposely wrote songs that relied on that reach so that average players would have difficulty playing.
                        I almost mentioned him. Sometimes I listen to classical music at work and every time one of his pieces airs it sounds like the pianist is having a spastic seizure.
                        "Take two placebos, works twice as well." Enzo

                        "Now get off my lawn with your silicooties and boom-chucka speakers and computers masquerading as amplifiers" Justin Thomas

                        "Being born on third base and thinking that you must have hit a triple is pure delusion!" Steve A

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Can you duet with less than 88 ?
                          Maybe this instructor is very hands on. Like the drivers ed cars with 2 sets of controls.
                          "Everything is better with a tube. I have a customer with an all-tube pacemaker. His heartbeat is steady, reassuring and dependable, not like a modern heartbeat. And if it goes wrong he can fix it himself. You can't do that with SMD." - Mick Bailey

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Certainly you can.
                            Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X