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    Equifax Hack

    143 million People's info was hacked recently from Equifax.
    To find out if you were effected, per CNN News, go to this website.
    5 things to do right now if you're worried about the Equifax hack - Sep. 9, 2017
    https://www.equifaxsecurity2017.com/
    You enter your last name and last 6 digits of your SSN.
    If you were in that group, it will tell you how to proceed.
    My info was in the hack, my wife's info was not.
    The info that was hacked includes your Name, Social Security numbers, birth dates, addresses, and driver's license numbers.
    GL,
    T
    Last edited by big_teee; 09-11-2017 at 03:39 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by big_teee View Post
    143 million Peoples info was hacked recently from Equifax.
    To find out if you were effected, per CNN News, go to this website.
    5 things to do right now if you're worried about the Equifax hack - Sep. 9, 2017
    https://www.equifaxsecurity2017.com/
    You enter your last name and last 6 digits of your SSN.
    If you were in that group, it will tell you how to proceed.
    My info was in the hack, my wife's info was not.
    The info that was hacked includes your Name, Social Security numbers, birth dates, addresses, and driver's license numbers.
    GL,
    T
    I dunno if I'd goto their website to verify that info or not. What's to say somethings not left behind on their network still passing on data?
    Anyways here is a blog that keeps up with that kind of stuff and I'd trust it more than I would Fox, CNN or any other news agency.
    nosaj

    https://krebsonsecurity.com/2017/09/...29#rssowlmlink
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    ToneOholic! big_teee's Avatar
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    It wasn't that invasive so what to hell.
    I also did a AV scan afterwards!

    There is also a class action lawsuit forming against Equifax.
    They did handle it poorly, and they have known for months, and just now telling the public.
    Not good.
    I just wanted everyone to be aware of it!
    T
    Last edited by big_teee; 09-10-2017 at 06:59 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by big_teee View Post
    It wasn't that invasive so what to hell.
    I also did a AV scan afterwards!

    There is also a class action lawsuit forming against Equifax.
    They did handle it poorly, and they have known for months, and just now telling the public.
    Not good.
    I just wanted everyone to be aware of it!
    T
    That's cool I just wanted to add info to it. Krebs security is one of the best places to find out about fraud.

    nosaj

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    Quote Originally Posted by nosaj View Post
    That's cool I just wanted to add info to it. Krebs security is one of the best places to find out about fraud.

    nosaj
    Update Looks like Argentian's are included in Equifax Hax. Better look JM.
    Ayuda! (Help!) Equifax Has My Data! ? Krebs on Security

    nosaj

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    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    Giving anyone the last 6 digits of your SSN is totally naive. The SSN only has 9 digits. If you give them the last 6 then they only need to figure out the first three. The first 3 numbers are issued according to where you're born.
    "Stand back, I'm holding a calculator." - chinrest

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    Senior Member Enzo's Avatar
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    But they ALREADY have you social security number, they are asking for the digits so you can identify to them who you are. You are not giving them information they do not already have.

    But what no one has mentioned is this: When you go through the procedure to find out if your account has been affected, you have to agree to terms. Most people just AGREE and move on. One of the terms is that by using their site to check your vulnerability you waive your right to sue.
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

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    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    instead of signing up for some monitoring service that requires you to agree to binding arbitration, you're better off just putting a freeze on your credit report with all 3 agencies so that nobody -- not even you -- can open a new line of credit. in my state the law requires that this service is free.
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    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    ToneOholic! big_teee's Avatar
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    I saw no agreement to terms to find out if you were on the list.
    Just name and 6 digits. (I rechecked the site, and reread the preliminary all again)
    As you go forward with enrollment, (which I haven't done) you probably have to agree to something.
    Last edited by big_teee; 09-13-2017 at 06:32 AM.
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    Senior Member Enzo's Avatar
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    yes, that is where it is. They discussed it on the news this past evening.
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

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    ToneOholic! big_teee's Avatar
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    That's not what the equifax website says.
    https://www.equifaxsecurity2017.com/

    Here it is copied.
    1) You Can Determine Your Status Immediately
    Some consumers who visited the website soon after its launch failed to receive confirmation clarifying whether or not they were potentially impacted. That issue is now resolved, and we encourage those consumers to revisit the site to receive a response that clarifies their status.

    2) No Waiver Of Rights For This Cyber Security Incident
    In response to consumer inquiries, we have made it clear that the arbitration clause and class action waiver included in the Equifax and TrustedID Premier terms of use does not apply to this cybersecurity incident.
    Technicians Run the World, but Bankers, Lawyers, and Accountants, Take All The Credit!
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    Senior Member Enzo's Avatar
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    class action waiver included in the Equifax and TrustedID Premier terms of use does not apply to this cybersecurity incident.
    If they removed the clause from the agreement, that is an update. If they did not remove it, and are just saying "oh we won't apply it", that means it is still in legal force. Even if they did remove it, the very fact they mention it in this manner means it had been there and was a concern for consumers. I don't doubt the negative press they were receiving was motive to make a change.

    Bottom line is ALWAYS read the terms on any site before agreeing to them.
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    ToneOholic! big_teee's Avatar
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    Yes read the terms.
    But, to use the Equifax quick verification, there are no terms.
    You can find out if you were effected without signing any terms.
    T
    Last edited by big_teee; 09-13-2017 at 06:38 PM.
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    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    regarding the 6 digit thing -- my bad. i didn't realize that the web site providing a hacked list was a legitimate new web site from the effected agency. i thought somebody might be phishing.

    regarding their attempts to get people to agree not to sue -- you're both right. Equifax did try to get people to waive their rights, and the news media got wind of it and bullied them about it. as a result Equifax backpedaled.

    I read the terms of service on all 3 of the sites regarding a credit lock. the ToS for a lock doesn't require you to waive your rights, presumably because there are laws that regulate credit locking. it seems that the credit bureaus would prefer to lure people into the monitoring services, so they get a subscription fee in addition to getting legal protection if they can get you to agree to the waiver.

    i think the better route to follow is to lock down your credit report so that nobody can access it. it used to be that you could only do this for a 90 day period and then the lock would auto-expire, which made the process of locking and re-locking your account every 90 days a real PITB. looking at this yesterday i didn't see any mention of auto-expiration. now it seems that the locks are permanent. i locked my credit report with the big 3 agencies so that nobody can open a line of credit in my name -- not even me.

    it's funny how the agencies are trying to sell us credit monitoring services with instant reporting of bad occurrences, when it's probably more effective to just lock down your credit so that nobody can access it. i'd rather stop access to my credit rating than to be told i'm a victim of identity theft in real time.
    Last edited by tboy; 09-15-2017 at 12:00 AM. Reason: typo
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    Senior Member Enzo's Avatar
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    But if I understand, locking your credit stops people from opening new accounts. But it does nothing to prevent someone stealing your existing identity and credit and running up a huge pile of purchases. The instant thing to your phone lets you know that your card is active somewhere even while it still sits in your pocket.
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

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    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    i guess we're addressing two types of identity theft. there are many.

    if you lose your card, or if someone tries to copy the tape strip on your card and gives the card back to you, you'll see those charges appear on your bill, dispute the charges with your CC company, they'll eat them and issue a new card with new numbers which effectively stops the CC thief from doing anything further. the good news is that with this kind of theft you're likely to see the charges appear because you get a statement every month that tells you what's going on. and you're protected from any loss by your CC company.

    to protect yourself from this kind of problem there's absolutely ZERO need for the monitoring services. My cardholder agreement with VISA and MC indemnify me from fraudulent charges. The CC company has to eat them. But the CC company doesn't like that, so they'd rather recruit you to monitor your account to protect THEM from fraudulent charges. by doing the monitoring, you've been suckered into working to protect them from fraud. and if you're a real sucker, you'll pay for the privilege of doing it by signing up for their real-time notification service. This plan works for them because there's a sucker born every minute.


    it's a bigger problem when someone grabs one of those pre-approved CC mailings and opens a CC account in your name and changes your address so that you don't get the statements. or if they take out a loan using your information and the paperwork goes to a different address. in that scenario you never even see the bills as the bad guys continue to rack up debt to reach your credit limit. they don't pay, the collection notices go somewhere else, and you never even hear about it until very late in the collection process when your credit is already ruined.

    locking down your credit report helps to prevent the bigger problem from occurring.

    what's important to remember is that the big 3 credit bureaus created the system that we're dealing with, and they created a system that they knew to be flawed, so that it could fail and so that they could sell you protection services against the flaws they created.

    by locking down your credit so that nobody can use it, you effectively marginalize those agencies. nobody can check your credit account, and a lending decision has to be based on factors other than an online check. oh, for the good old days when your local banker knew you and made their own decision about risk instead of shoving the decision off to a credit bureau's computer.
    Last edited by tboy; 09-14-2017 at 11:57 PM. Reason: typo
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    Senior Member Enzo's Avatar
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    I was simply defending the phone app as having some usefulness.
    Education is what you're left with after you have forgotten what you have learned.

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    ToneOholic! big_teee's Avatar
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    Having 3 companies monitor the credit of all us seems like a strange system to start with.
    Equifax, Experian, TransUnion.
    None of them ever got our consent to do so, Strange!
    At my age, I don't do credit, I don't want credit.
    I think I want to see about locking mine down.
    I'm old fashioned and still pay for things with cash!
    T
    Technicians Run the World, but Bankers, Lawyers, and Accountants, Take All The Credit!
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    ToneOholic! big_teee's Avatar
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    Here's info about credit freeze.
    https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/article...it-freeze-faqs
    You have to pay each of the 3 bureaus to activate the freeze.
    T
    Technicians Run the World, but Bankers, Lawyers, and Accountants, Take All The Credit!
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    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by big_teee View Post
    Here's info about credit freeze.
    https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/article...it-freeze-faqs
    You have to pay each of the 3 bureaus to activate the freeze.
    T
    Maybe you missed that this information was provided in Post #9.
    Whether or not you have to pay for the credit freeze depends on the laws in your state.
    In my state there is no charge for freezing. If there's a charge in your state then you need to thank you state legislators and not blame the credit bureaus. They didn't write your state laws.
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    Old Timer Leo_Gnardo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by big_teee View Post
    Having 3 companies monitor the credit of all us seems like a strange system to start with.
    Equifax, Experian, TransUnion.
    Four, or more. Fair Isaac seems to be king of 'em all. When you go for a mortgage, the banks don't give a whiz what's your Experian score. FICO is what counts.

    And who knows what gummint outfits too, NSA, IRS, Social Security Admin etc. Let's not leave out Kaspersky, I'm sure our Russian friends won't miss a chance to cash in on any info they can get.
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    Senior Member Enzo's Avatar
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    Not being a smart ass, legitimate question: How do you pay cash buying things online? Like parts?

    No one does COD any more. When I was a kid, COD was common, the mailman showed up with your parts, and you handed him $3.28 or whatever.

    There are the three main credit bureaus. If someone wanted to, I suppose they could start a fourth. Nothing magic about three. used to be there were two revolving credit cards - Visa and Mastercard. AmEx was different, it was a pay the whole balance every month deal. Then at some point Sears decided to get into the credit card game, and invented Discover Card. It has been with us ever since. Same thing could happen with credit bureaus.
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    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enzo View Post
    Not being a smart ass, legitimate question: How do you pay cash buying things online? Like parts?
    Mail order & money order. How do you think the unabomber got his stuff from Mouser?
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    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    Looks like Equifax (NYSE:EFX) is down from the high of 147.02 down to 102.25 as I write this. Down 13+ points today. Couldn't happen to a nicer group of people.
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    ToneOholic! big_teee's Avatar
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    That is debatable?
    I pay cash for things if I can locally, when possible.
    Yes we all do some online purchases.

    T
    Last edited by big_teee; 09-14-2017 at 02:42 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by bob p View Post
    i think the better route to follow is to lock down your credit report so that nobody can access it.
    ... it's probably more effective to just lock down your credit so that nobody can access it.
    Bob, please clarify for me. In that quote and other statements you sometimes say "lock credit report" and sometimes say "lock credit".
    These seem to be 2 quite different things to me, though related and maybe dependent.
    Am I correct to think that you actually lock your credit report which would tend to prevent (in most cases) anyone from granting credit?
    Certified Dotard

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    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    yes. i got lazy while typing.
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    Supporting Member eschertron's Avatar
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    conspiracy theory tangent: what if equifax didn't really get hacked? is there an upside?

    in Ohio (where I live) there's a $5 fee for freezing the credit report. I'm calling that average for all affected.
    $5 x 143,000,000 users x 3 agencies = a potential for 2.145 BILLION US$ collected from nervous consumers. Yeah equifax only gets a third of that pie

    Maybe only a few people actually care. 1% of this is still $21 Million. Not a windfall, but still not peanuts if the consumer base just shrugs the report of hacking off. Does equifax lose either way?
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  30. #30
    ToneOholic! big_teee's Avatar
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    Equifax is losing for sure.
    Their stock has dropped $50 a share since first of august.
    Equifax is not charging to stop credit.
    The other two get $5-10, depends on your zip code.
    PA. Attorney general is after EF big time.
    T
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    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eschertron View Post
    conspiracy theory tangent: what if equifax didn't really get hacked? is there an upside?
    This reminds me of the WIntel alliance. All of these different software companies work together toward a common goal... one of them creates crappy software that's full of exploits and one of their alliance partners swiftly creates "antivirus" software to plug the holes. They create a problem and then they profit by charging you to fix it.

    In the context of the credit bureaus, I don't think they created the leak to generate revenue from credit locks. There's not enough money in the credit-locking fees to cover the liability that they're going to face if people get wiped out due to identity theft. I think this is a genuine unplanned disaster on the part of EFX.

    I do agree though, that the whole concept of identity theft is something that the credit bureaus have created. The credit bureaus created the model of collecting information about us and selling it to third parties that occur in blind transactions that we're not even aware of. When their system gets exploited, the individual can suffer irreparable damage.

    Why does this continue to happen? Their model fails to protect the people whose data is being bought and sold. Their model has created the ability for thieves to commit identify theft and they remain non-responsible for the outcome. Only in a place like the USA, where big corporations can write the laws that effect them, can a company subject you to this sort of risk without responsibility and without liability. Only in the USA can they allow someone's life to be ruined through identity theft without taking the blame, while at the same time profiting by selling everyone a credit monitoring service as a "solution" to the problem they created.

    Isn't it great that they can make money by playing on both sides?
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    Quote Originally Posted by bob p View Post
    yes. i got lazy while typing.
    Not just you, I'm now seeing how-to's on "freeze your credit", which seems to be impossible, though I kind of like the idea.
    Certified Dotard

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    ToneOholic! big_teee's Avatar
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    Implications of the Equifax hack are far reaching.
    Some portfolio managers are having account holders create Unique user names and change passwords.
    Some are using voice recognition for phone calling about accounts.
    I updated my main accounts yesterday, I was needing to do that anyway.
    This was the incentive to get it done!

    Still haven't heard who actually hacked Equifax?
    The emphasis has been put on the hack, but not on who did it?
    Anyone know the answer to that?

    Keep an ear out for best class action lawsuit.
    If there is anything that actually materializes and is legit, I may put my name on the list?
    T
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  34. #34
    Better Tone thru Mathematics bob p's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by big_teee View Post
    Implications of the Equifax hack are far reaching.
    Some portfolio managers are having account holders create Unique user names and change passwords.
    Some are using voice recognition for phone calling about accounts.
    I'm not at all enthusiastic about the use of voice recognition for verification.

    I have telemarketers calling all the time, asking questions that try to get me to say my name and answer yes to another seemingly meaningless question, like "Can you hear me?"

    They're probably recording the call so that they can edit together a recording that would sound like a bank authentication order. Be careful when you answer the phone.
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  35. #35
    ToneOholic! big_teee's Avatar
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    I've never allowed the voice recognition to be activated on any of my accounts.
    I seldom call them anyway. I mainly access by computer.
    My main concern is about computer hacking. I've tried to implement as many safe guards as possible.
    The Finance folks are as much concerned about hiding the user name as the password.
    I came up with user names I have to read off of my password book to access my own accounts.
    I think they need to have some public hangings, maybe that would slow some of the data thievery?
    Anyway, just wanted to mention the account security, in case some have not thought about doing so.
    T
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